The Changing Earth

Rates of Geomorphological Processes
Author: Andrew S. Goudie
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9780631194682
Category: Science
Page: 352
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Discovering the rates at which landscapes change and the causes of these changes is a key current focus in geoscientific, environmental, ecological and archaeological research. The mechanisms are intricate involving many components - a complex of positive and negative feedback mechanisms, and scales varying from the solar system and global tectonics to the activities of microscopic organisms. In this book Andrew Goudie draws together the findings of many disparate disciplines (and of his own research) to present a coherent and structured account of what is known and what remains to be discovered about change and the variable rate of change in the shape and environment of the earth's surface. This is not a research monograph but a research synthesis presented in terms comprehensible to workers in a wide range of disciplines.

Landscapes on the Edge:

New Horizons for Research on Earth's Surface
Author: Committee on Challenges and Opportunities in Earth Surface Processes,Board on Earth Sciences and Resources,Division on Earth and Life Studies,National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309140242
Category: Science
Page: 180
View: 9944

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During geologic spans of time, Earth's shifting tectonic plates, atmosphere, freezing water, thawing ice, flowing rivers, and evolving life have shaped Earth's surface features. The resulting hills, mountains, valleys, and plains shelter ecosystems that interact with all life and provide a record of Earth surface processes that extend back through Earth's history. Despite rapidly growing scientific knowledge of Earth surface interactions, and the increasing availability of new monitoring technologies, there is still little understanding of how these processes generate and degrade landscapes. Landscapes on the Edge identifies nine grand challenges in this emerging field of study and proposes four high-priority research initiatives. The book poses questions about how our planet's past can tell us about its future, how landscapes record climate and tectonics, and how Earth surface science can contribute to developing a sustainable living surface for future generations.

Contemporary Meanings in Physical Geography

From What to Why?
Author: Andre Roy,Stephen Trudgill
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1444144669
Category: Science
Page: 256
View: 2776

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Over the past twenty years, geography as an academic discipline has become more and more reflective, asking the key questions 'What are we doing?' 'Why are we doing it?'. These questions have, so far, been more enthusiastically taken up by human geography rather than physical geography. Contemporary Meanings in Physical Geography aims to redress the balance. Written and edited by a distinguished group of physical geographers, Contemporary Meanings in Physical Geography comprises of a collection of international writer's thoughts which reveal personal motivations, and look at tensions in the worlds of meaning in which physical geography is involved. How are the meanings of the physical environment derived? Is the future of physical geography one where the only, or at least the dominant, meanings are framed in the contexts of environmental issues. Covering a diverse and lively selection of topics, the contributors of this book offer guides to the contemporary debates in the philosophy of physical geography, and introduce the reader to its wider cultural significance. This book is an essential companion to anyone studying, or with an interest in, physical geography.

The Earth's Land Surface

Landforms and Processes in Geomorphology
Author: Kenneth J Gregory
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1848606206
Category: Science
Page: 348
View: 1508

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This introductory text details the land surface of the earth in a readable style covering the major issues, key themes and sensitivities of the environments/landscape. Emphasizing the major ideas and their development, each chapter includes case studies and details of influential scientists (not necessarily geomorphologists) who have contributed to the progress of understanding. Providing a very clear explanation of the understanding achieved and of the debates that have arisen, the book is comprised of 12 chapters in four sections: Visualizing the land surface explains and explores the composition of the land surface and outlines how it has been studied Dynamics of the land surface considers the dynamics affecting the earth’s land surface including its influences, processes and the changes that have occurred Environments of the land surface looks to understand the land surface in major world regions highlighting differences between the areas Management of the land surface is an examination of the current and future prospects of the management of the earth’s land surface

The SAGE Handbook of Geomorphology


Author: Kenneth J Gregory,Andrew S Goudie
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1473971551
Category: Science
Page: 648
View: 9924

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Geomorphology is the study of the Earth's diverse physical land-surface features and the dynamic processes that shape these features. Examining natural and anthropogenic processes, The SAGE Handbook of Geomorphology is a comprehensive exposition of the fundamentals of geomorphology that examines form, process, and applications of the discipline. Organized into five substantive sections, the Handbook is an overview of: • Foundations and Relevance: including the nature and scope of geomorphology; the origins and development of geomorphology; the role and character of theory in geomorphology; geomorphology and environmental management; and geomorphology and society • Techniques and Approaches: including observations and experiments; geomorphological mapping; the significance of models; process and form; dating surfaces and sediment; remote sensing in geomorphology; GIS in geomorphology; biogeomorphology; human activity • Process and Environment: including the evolution of regolith; weathering; fluids, flows and fluxes; sediment transport and deposition; hill slopes; riverine environments; glacial geomorphology; periglacial environments; coastal environments; aeolian environments; tropical environments; karst and karst processes • Environmental Change: including landscape evolution and tectonics; interpreting quaternary environments; environmental change; disturbance and responses to geomorphic systems • Conclusion: including challenges and perspectives; and a concluding review The Handbook has contributions from 48 international authors and was initially organized by the International Association of Geomorphologists. This will be a much-used and much-cited reference for researchers in Geomorphology, Physical Geography and the Environmental Sciences.

Understanding the Changing Planet:

Strategic Directions for the Geographical Sciences
Author: Committee on Strategic Directions for the Geographical Sciences in the Next Decade,Board on Earth Sciences and Resources,Division on Earth and Life Studies,National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309150752
Category: Science
Page: 172
View: 1585

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From the oceans to continental heartlands, human activities have altered the physical characteristics of Earth's surface. With Earth's population projected to peak at 8 to 12 billion people by 2050 and the additional stress of climate change, it is more important than ever to understand how and where these changes are happening. Innovation in the geographical sciences has the potential to advance knowledge of place-based environmental change, sustainability, and the impacts of a rapidly changing economy and society. Understanding the Changing Planet outlines eleven strategic directions to focus research and leverage new technologies to harness the potential that the geographical sciences offer.

Fundamentals of Geomorphology


Author: Richard John Huggett
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317378385
Category: Science
Page: 544
View: 663

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The new fourth edition of Fundamentals of Geomorphology continues to provide a comprehensive introduction to the subject by discussing the latest developments in the field, as well as covering the basics of Earth surface forms and processes. The revised edition has an improved logically cohesive structure, added recent material on Quaternary environments and landscapes, landscape evolution and tectonics, as well as updated information in fast-changing areas such as the application of dating techniques, digital terrain modelling, historical contingency, preglacial landforms, neocatastrophism, and biogeomorphology. The book begins with a consideration of the nature of geomorphology, process and form, history, and geomorphic systems, and moves on to discuss: Endogenic processes: structural landforms associated with plate tectonics and those associated with volcanoes, impact craters, and folds, faults, and joints. Exogenic processes: landforms resulting from, or influenced by, the exogenic agencies of weathering, running water, flowing ice and meltwater, ground ice and frost, the wind, and the sea; landforms developed on limestone; and long-term geomorphology, a discussion of ancient landforms, including palaeosurfaces, stagnant landscape features, and evolutionary aspects of landscape change. Featuring over 400 illustrations, diagrams, and tables, Fundamentals of Geomorphology provides a stimulating and innovative perspective on the key topics and debates within the field of geomorphology. Written in an accessible and lively manner, and providing guides to further reading, chapter summaries, and an extensive glossary of key terms, this is an indispensable undergraduate level textbook for students of physical geography.

Geomorphological Processes

Studies in Physical Geography
Author: E Derbyshire,J. R. Hails,K. J. Gregory
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 1483192407
Category: Science
Page: 316
View: 7951

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Geomorphological Processes describes land forms and land form changes, particularly regarding the rates of operation of these events. This book describes the mechanics of the geomorphological processes; the text also shows the application of an equation to explain trends in geomorphology that involves land forms (or results, a dependent variable), processes, and materials (both independent variables). The authors explain endogenetic and exogenetic processes, as well as the control systems approach. They explain the drainage basin processes which collect, concentrate, and promote water mobility and sedimentation. They also discuss the coastal processes concerning waves, tidal variations, sediment budgets, hydrodynamics of near-shore zones; the book also addresses shoreline configuration, planning, and coastal protection. The authors analyze the cryonival and glacial process such as the formation of ice in the landscape, glacial erosion, debris entrainment, meltwater erosion, and glaci-aquatic sedimentation. The text shows the difficulty of measuring the parameters in the relationship between water action and sediment movement. This book is intended for first or second year students in geology, hydrology, and those whose majors are in meteorology. It can also benefit readers whose interest lie with the environment or with the general earth sciences.

Anthropogenic Geomorphology

A Guide to Man-Made Landforms
Author: József Szabó,Lóránt Dávid,Denes Loczy
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9789048130580
Category: Science
Page: 250
View: 7726

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Anthropogenic geomorphology studies society’s impact on the geographical environment, and especially on the Earth’s surface. This volume provides guidance to students discussing the basic topics of anthropogenic geomorphology. The chapters cover both its system, and its connections with other sciences, as well as the way the subject can contribute to tackling today’s practical problems. The book represents all fields of geomorphology, giving an introduction to the diversity of the discipline through examples taken from a range of contexts and periods, and focusing on examples from Europe. It is no accident that anthropogenic geomorphology has been gaining ground within geomorphology itself. Its results advance not only the theoretical development of the science but can be applied directly to social and economic issues. Worldwide, anthropogenic geomorphology is an integral and expanding part of earth sciences curricula in higher education, making this a timely and relevant text.

Engineering Geology and the Environment


Author: Paul G. Marinos
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 9789054108818
Category: Engineering geology
Page: 4076
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This fourth volume of five from the June 1997 conference was much delayed (the first four volumes were published in 1997). It comprises 23 special lectures solicited for the conference on various aspects of problematic soils, natural and man-made hazards, urban and regional planning, waste disposal, mines and quarries, large engineering works, and protection of geological, geographical, historical, and architectural heritage. There is no subject index. Annotation copyrighted by Book News Inc., Portland, OR

Geomorphology and Natural Hazards

Proceedings of the 25th Binghamton Symposium in Geomorphology, Held September 24-25, 1994 at SUNY, Binghamton, USA
Author: M. Morisawa
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 1483290549
Category: Science
Page: 366
View: 7457

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The theme of this proceedings volume is the latest research on geomorphic characteristics and processes associated with natural hazards. Presentations cover a gamut of types of disasters throughout the world, describing research and applications of studies in the U.S. and other countries. The book begins with a collection of papers giving a basic background and philosophy of approaching an understanding of natural disasters. These are followed by papers on natural hazards in coastal areas, mountainous regions, landslides, flooding and the detrimental effects of permafrost. The book should prove valuable in gaining an insight of natural hazards and their geomorphic relations, which is imperative for prudent environmental planning in coping with disasters.

Introduction to Process Geomorphology


Author: Vijay K. Sharma
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1439882789
Category: Science
Page: 435
View: 7854

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Introduction to Process Geomorphology provides an integrative approach to the process dynamics and the origin of landforms by the contemporary processes involved in their evolution. The author highlights the physical and chemical laws governing the activity of the earth-surface processes in specific environmental stress conditions, puts forward competing hypotheses on the evolution of landforms, and discusses the bases of internal geologic processes for the explanation of the tectogenic features of the earth. Landforms evolve over a long period of cyclic and geologic time, inheriting the imprints of past process rates and/or process domains. The principles and methods of evaluating the signature of environmental change are highlighted in the text by citing suitable studies. The process-form relationships provide the building blocks also for the optimum utilization of the land resources of the earth, and quantitative assessment of the stability of geomorphic systems and the quality of environment. The approach in this part of the text enables readers to gain an in-depth understanding of the application of the principles of geomorphology to the evaluation, planning, and management of the earth’s resources for sustainable development. This book discusses process dynamics in quantitative terms and reviews theories on the evolution of landforms that flow from theoretical and empirical data. It offers examples and case studies that enable students to comprehend the related components of process-landform relationships. The review and synthesis of information found in each chapter provides a better understanding of the complexity of still inadequately understood process activities and the manner of landform evolution.

Geomorphology of Desert Environments


Author: Anthony J. Parsons,A. D. Abrahams
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1402057199
Category: Science
Page: 831
View: 2240

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About one-third of the Earth’s land surface experiences a desert climate, and this area supports approximately 15% of the planet’s population. This percentage continues to grow, and with this growth comes the need to acquire and apply an understanding of desert geomorphology. Such an understanding is vital in managing scarce and fragile resources and in mitigating natural hazards. This authoritative reference book is comprehensive in its coverage of the geomorphology of desert environments, and is arranged thematically. It begins with an overview of global deserts, proceeds through treatments of weathering, hillslopes, rivers, piedmonts, lake basins, and aeolian surfaces, and concludes with a discussion of the role of climatic change. Written by a team of international authors, all of whom are active in the field, the chapters cover the spectrum of desert geomorphology.

Geomorphology in the Anthropocene


Author: Andrew S. Goudie,Heather A. Viles
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316785262
Category: Science
Page: N.A
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The Anthropocene is a major new concept in the Earth sciences and this book examines the effects on geomorphology within this period. Drawing examples from many different global environments, this comprehensive volume demonstrates that human impact on landforms and land-forming processes is profound, due to various driving forces, including: use of fire; extinction of fauna; development of agriculture, urbanisation, and globalisation; and new methods of harnessing energy. The book explores the ways in which future climate change due to anthropogenic causes may further magnify effects on geomorphology, with respect to future hazards such as floods and landslides, the state of the cryosphere, and sea level. The book concludes with a consideration of the ways in which landforms are now being managed and protected. Covering all major aspects of geomorphology, this book is ideal for undergraduate and graduate students studying geomorphology, environmental science and physical geography, and for all researchers of geomorphology.

People as an agent of environmental change


Author: R. A. Nicholson,Terence Patrick O'Connor
Publisher: Oxbow Books Ltd
ISBN: 9781842170021
Category: Social Science
Page: 133
View: 5071

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The papers in this volume revisit one of the concerns which dominated environmental archaeology through the 1960s and 1970s, namely the timing, nature and extent of human impact on the environment. The thirteen contributions reflect the diversity of approaches and ideas today and show how our understanding of the place of people in ecosystems is now more subtle. There are papers on palynological evidence from the Strymon Delta in Macedonia; prehistoric copper mining at Mount Gabriel, Ireland; fungal spores as anthropogenic indicators on Shetland; prehistoric human impact on the prehistoric environments of Orkney, North York Moors and the Mid-Devon landscape; mites as indicators of human impact in the Netherlands; the disappearance of Elmid Riffle Beetles' from lowland river systems in Britain; and case studies from further afield: palaeoenvironmental reconstruction in the Central Mexican Highlands; food plant availability in the Murchison Basin, Western Australia, prior to European arrival and Paleoindian expansion into South America.

Late Quaternary Environmental Change

Physical and Human Perspectives
Author: Martin Bell,M.J.C. Walker
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317904796
Category: Science
Page: 368
View: 3522

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Late Quaternary Environmental Change addresses the interaction between human agency and other environmental factors in the landscapes, particularly of the temperate zone. Taking an ecological approach, the authors cover the last 20,000 years during which the climate has shifted from arctic severity to the conditions of the present interglacial environment.