The Landmark Arrian

The Campaigns of Alexander
Author: James S. Romm
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 1400079675
Category: History
Page: 503
View: 4520

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During twelve years of continuous campaigns, Alexander conquered an empire that stretched from the shores of the Adriatic to the edge of modern India. Arrian's history of those conquests is the most reliable and detailed account to emerge from the ancient world. --from publisher description

The Greek Alexander Romance


Author: Richard Stoneman
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141907118
Category: History
Page: 208
View: 449

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Mystery surrounds the parentage of Alexander, the prince born to Queen Olympias. Is his father Philip, King of Macedonia, or Nectanebo, the mysterious sorcerer who seduced the queen by trickery? One thing is certain: the boy is destined to conquer the known world. He grows up to fulfil this prophecy, building a mighty empire that spans from Greece and Italy to Africa and Asia. Begun soon after the real Alexander's death and expanded in the centuries that followed, The Greek Alexander Myth depicts the life and adventures of one of history's greatest heroes - taming the horse Bucephalus, meeting the Amazons and his quest to defeat the King of Persia. Including such elements of fantasy as Alexander's ascent to heaven borne by eagles, this literary masterpiece brilliantly evokes a lost age of heroism.

Alexander of Macedon, 356-323 B.C.

A Historical Biography
Author: Peter Green
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520275861
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 617
View: 1726

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This biography begins not with one of the universally known incidents of Alexander's life, but with an account of his father, Philip of Macedonia, whose many-territoried empire was the first on the continent of Europe to have an effectively centralized government and military. What Philip and Macedonia had to offer, Alexander made his own, but Philip and Macedonia also made Alexander form an important context for understanding Alexander himself. Yet his origins and training do not fully explain the man. After he was named hegemon of the Hellenic League, many philosophers came to congratulate Alexander, but one was conspicuous by his absence: Diogenes the Cynic, an ascetic who lived in a clay tub. Piqued and curious, Alexander himself visited the philosopher, who, when asked if there was anything Alexander could do for him, made the famous reply, "Don't stand between me and the sun." Alexander's courtiers jeered, but Alexander silenced them: "If I were not Alexander, I would be Diogenes." This remark was as unexpected in Alexander as it would be in a modern leader. -- Publisher.

Alexander the Great and the Logistics of the Macedonian Army


Author: Donald W. Engels
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520042728
Category: History
Page: 194
View: 5099

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The most important work on Alexander the Great to appear in a long time. Engels uses all the archaeological work done in Asia in the past generation and makes it accessible. Careful analysis of terrain, climate, and supply requirements are throughout combined in a fashion to help account for Alexander's strategic decision in the light of the options open to him. The chief merit of this splendid book is the way in which it brings an ancient army to life, as it really was and moved: the hours it took for simple operations of washing and cooking and feeding animals; the train of noncombatants moving with the army--New York Review of Books.

The Hellenistic World from Alexander to the Roman Conquest

A Selection of Ancient Sources in Translation
Author: M. M. Austin
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139455794
Category: History
Page: 656
View: 6145

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The Hellenistic period began with the considerable expansion of the Greek world through the Macedonian conquest of the Persian empire and ended with Rome becoming the predominant political force in that world. This new and enlarged edition of Michel Austin's seminal work provides a panoramic view of this world through the medium of ancient sources. It now comprises over three hundred texts from literary, epigraphic and papyrological sources which are presented in original translations and supported by introductory sections, detailed notes and references, chronological tables, maps, illustrations of coins, and a full analytical index. The first edition has won widespread admiration since its publication in 1981. Updated with reference to the most recent scholarship on the subject, this new edition will prove invaluable for the study of a period which has received increasing recognition.

Alexander the Great


Author: Philip Freeman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781439193280
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 416
View: 9101

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In the first authoritative biography of Alexander the Great written for a general audience in a generation, classicist and historian Philip Freeman tells the remarkable life of the great conqueror. The celebrated Macedonian king has been one of the most enduring figures in history. He was a general of such skill and renown that for two thousand years other great leaders studied his strategy and tactics, from Hannibal to Napoleon, with countless more in between. He flashed across the sky of history like a comet, glowing brightly and burning out quickly: crowned at age nineteen, dead by thirty-two. He established the greatest empire of the ancient world; Greek coins and statues are found as far east as Afghanistan. Our interest in him has never faded. Alexander was born into the royal family of Macedonia, the kingdom that would soon rule over Greece. Tutored as a boy by Aristotle, Alexander had an inquisitive mind that would serve him well when he faced formidable obstacles during his military campaigns. Shortly after taking command of the army, he launched an invasion of the Persian empire, and continued his conquests as far south as the deserts of Egypt and as far east as the mountains of present-day Pakistan and the plains of India. Alexander spent nearly all his adult life away from his homeland, and he and his men helped spread the Greek language throughout western Asia, where it would become the lingua franca of the ancient world. Within a short time after Alexander’s death in Baghdad, his empire began to fracture. Best known among his successors are the Ptolemies of Egypt, whose empire lasted until Cleopatra. In his lively and authoritative biography of Alexander, classical scholar and historian Philip Freeman describes Alexander’s astonishing achievements and provides insight into the mercurial character of the great conqueror. Alexander could be petty and magnanimous, cruel and merciful, impulsive and farsighted. Above all, he was ferociously, intensely competitive and could not tolerate losing—which he rarely did. As Freeman explains, without Alexander, the influence of Greece on the ancient world would surely not have been as great as it was, even if his motivation was not to spread Greek culture for beneficial purposes but instead to unify his empire. Only a handful of people have influenced history as Alexander did, which is why he continues to fascinate us.

Alexander the Great


Author: Ulrich Wilcken
Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing
ISBN: 1787202585
Category: History
Page: 278
View: 7043

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“ALEXANDER THE GREAT opened a new era in the history of the world, and by his life’s work determined its development for many centuries. He is conspicuous among the great men of history, because this work was accomplished in so short a span; when he died, he had not yet reached his thirty-third year. It was as a great conqueror that he impressed the popular imagination of every race. He subdued the East and penetrated into India, that land of wonders. The legend about him, equally current in East and West, took him to the limits of the earth and even to the gates of Paradise. The permanent result of his life, however, was not the empire which he won by hard fighting, but the development of Greek civilisation into a civilisation which was worldwide. It is in this way that his influence has affected the history of mankind even down to our own time. He had first to create his empire; the decision of the battlefield had, as usual, to produce the external conditions for the new civilisation.” Originally published in 1932, Ulrich Wilcken’s distinguished biography of Alexander the Great is widely regarded as a classic, perfectly capturing Alexander’s true achievements and influence. Translated from German by G. C. Richards, Professor of Greek and Classical Literature at Oriel College, Oxford University.

Dividing the Spoils

The War for Alexander the Great's Empire
Author: Robin Waterfield
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199931526
Category: History
Page: 273
View: 8227

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"Dividing the spoils" revives the memory of Alexander's Successors, whose fame has been dimmed only because they stand in his enormous shadow. In fact, Alexander left things in a mess at the time of his death, with no guaranteed succession, no administration in place suitable for such an enormous realm, and huge untamed areas both bordering and within his 'empire'. The Successors consolidated the Conqueror's gains. Their competing ambitions, however, meant that consolidation inevitably led to the break-up of the empire.

Alexander the Great


Author: Robin Lane Fox
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141925981
Category: History
Page: 576
View: 8122

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Tough, resolute, fearless, Alexander was a born warrior and ruler of passionate ambition who understood the intense adventure of conquest and of the unknown. When he died in 323 BC aged thirty-two, his vast empire comprised more than two million square miles, spanning from Greece to India. His achievements were unparalleled - he had excelled as leader to his men, founded eighteen new cities and stamped the face of Greek culture on the ancient East. The myth he created is as potent today as it was in the ancient world. Robin Lane Fox's superb account searches through the mass of conflicting evidence and legend to focus on Alexander as a man of his own time. Combining historical scholarship and acute psychological insight, it brings this colossal figure vividly to life.

Alexander the Great

The Hunt for a New Past
Author: Paul Cartledge
Publisher: Vintage Books
ISBN: 1400079195
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 368
View: 1721

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An analysis of Alexander the Great's political and military accomplishments traces the path of his armies while charting the course of his influence, citing his impact on military tactics, scholarship, and politics throughout history while describing the many roles with which he has been credited. Reprint. 20,000 first printing.

The Conquest of Gaul


Author: Julius Caesar,W. A. MacDevitt
Publisher: Digireads.com Publishing
ISBN: 9781420945140
Category: History
Page: 140
View: 3523

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First published just before the end of the Roman Republic by that legendary country's most immortalized leader, "The Conquest of Gaul," also called "Commentarii de Bello Gallico," is an account of Julius Caesar's capture of Gaul in the first century. Beginning with the Helvetian War in 58 BC, Caesar uses his exemplary Latin prose to explain how his forces were protecting Provence, and how they were later drawn out in campaigns against the Veneti, the Aquitani, numerous Germanic peoples, the Belgae, the Gauls, and the Bretons. Caesar, perhaps in defense of his expensive and geographically vast wars, explains the methods of his campaigns, from the timing of the seasons to provisioning and defense. This autobiographical work is both a concise reckoning of forces and an informative wartime narrative, consistently revealing the author as a politically brilliant commander and an unrivaled man.

The Expedition of Cyrus


Author: Xenophon,,Robin Waterfield,Tim Rood
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199555982
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 6838

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The Expedition of Cyrus tells the story of the march of the Ten Thousand. The exploits of this famous army of Greek mercenaries in modern-day Turkey, Syria, and Iraq were described by one of their leaders, the Athenian historian and philosopher Xenophon. Their long march, across mountains and plateaux to the sight of 'The sea! The sea!', back to the fringes of the Greek world, is the most exciting adventure story to survive from the ancient world.

Into the Land of Bones

Alexander the Great in Afghanistan
Author: Frank L. Holt
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520953754
Category: History
Page: 264
View: 2768

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The so-called first war of the twenty-first century actually began more than 2,300 years ago when Alexander the Great led his army into what is now a sprawling ruin in northern Afghanistan. Frank L. Holt vividly recounts Alexander's invasion of ancient Bactria, situating in a broader historical perspective America's war in Afghanistan.

The Book of Alexander the Great

A Life of the Conqueror
Author: Richard Stoneman
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 1848852940
Category: History
Page: 178
View: 1605

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The Book of Alexander the Great - or the Phyllada - has for three centuries been the most popular account of Alexander's career in modern Greece. After circulating in manuscript form, it was first published in 1680 in Venice, and has been continuously in print in Greek ever since. The Phyllada broadly follows the structure of the ancient Alexander Romance, but is much better organized and is a work of popular literature reflecting the immense interest that the Conqueror has generated since earliest times. Numerous folktales and local legends kept his story alive, and many works about Alexander circulated in manuscript during the Byzantine period. The Phyllada is the culmination of this tradition. Yet it has never been translated into English: a surprising neglect which Richard Stoneman - an acknowledged expert on Alexander - makes good in this elegant rendering supplemented by a full introduction. As a piece of literature, the Phyllada is among the best treatments of the Alexander legend, being full of color and human interest. Alexander not only encounters the heroes of Troy on his adventures but wears the crown and robe of Solomon. His descent into the "Cave of the Gods" (Greek and Egyptian gods in the Romance) becomes a visit to a hell described in Christian terms. The pagan Alexander is thus filtered through a modern lens and becomes an emblem of the good king. The sophisticated narrative structure and world view of the Phyllada account for its lasting influence. This new translation does it full justice.

The Conquests of Alexander the Great


Author: Waldemar Heckel
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107394651
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 5359

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In this book, Waldemar Heckel traces the rise and eventual fall of one of the most successful military commanders in history. In 325 BCE, Alexander and his conquering army prepared to return home, after overcoming everything in their path: armies, terrain, climate, all invariably hostile. Little did they know that within two years their beloved king would be dead and their labours seemingly wasted. Tracing the rise and eventual fall of one of the most successful military commanders in history, Heckel engagingly and with great detail shows us how Alexander earned his appellation, The Great.

Ghost on the Throne

The Death of Alexander the Great and the Bloody Fight for His Empire
Author: James Romm
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307701506
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 2030

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Alexander the Great, perhaps the most commanding leader in history, united his empire and his army by the titanic force of his will. His death at the age of thirty-two spelled the end of that unity. The story of Alexander’s conquest of the Persian empire is known to many readers, but the dramatic and consequential saga of the empire’s collapse remains virtually untold. It is a tale of loss that begins with the greatest loss of all, the death of the Macedonian king who had held the empire together. With his demise, it was as if the sun had disappeared from the solar system, as if planets and moons began to spin crazily in new directions, crashing into one another with unimaginable force. Alexander bequeathed his power, legend has it, “to the strongest,” leaving behind a mentally damaged half brother and a posthumously born son as his only heirs. In a strange compromise, both figures—Philip III and Alexander IV—were elevated to the kingship, quickly becoming prizes, pawns, fought over by a half-dozen Macedonian generals. Each successor could confer legitimacy on whichever general controlled him. At the book’s center is the monarch’s most vigorous defender; Alexander’s former Greek secretary, now transformed into a general himself. He was a man both fascinating and entertaining, a man full of tricks and connivances, like the enthroned ghost of Alexander that gives the book its title, and becomes the determining factor in the precarious fortunes of the royal family. James Romm, brilliant classicist and storyteller, tells the galvanizing saga of the men who followed Alexander and found themselves incapable of preserving his empire. The result was the undoing of a world, formerly united in a single empire, now ripped apart into a nightmare of warring nation-states struggling for domination, the template of our own times. From the Hardcover edition.

Alexander the Great - An Illustrated Military History

The Rise of Macedonia, the Battles, Campaigns and Tactics of Alexander, and the Collapse of His Vast Empire After His Early Death, Depicted in More Than 250 Pictures
Author: Nigel Rodgers
Publisher: Anness Pub Limited
ISBN: 9781844768219
Category: History
Page: 128
View: 5421

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A magnificent illustrated military history of Alexander The Great: covering the rise of Macedonia, the battles, campaigns and tactics of Alexander, and the collapse of his vast empire after his early death, all depicted in more than 250 pictures.