The Cambridge Companion to `Frankenstein'


Author: Andrew Smith
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107086191
Category: Comics & Graphic Novels
Page: 288
View: 9577

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Sixteen original essays by leading scholars on Mary Shelley's novel provide an introduction to Frankenstein and its various critical contexts.

The Cambridge Companion to Mary Shelley


Author: Esther Schor
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521007702
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 289
View: 6897

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'The Cambridge Companion to Mary Shelley' helps readers to assess for themselves her remarkable body of work. In clear, accessible essays, a distinguished group of scholars place Shelley's works in several historical and aesthetic contexts.

The Cambridge Companion to Fantasy Literature


Author: Edward James,Farah Mendlesohn
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107493730
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 298
View: 3853

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Fantasy is a creation of the Enlightenment, and the recognition that excitement and wonder can be found in imagining impossible things. From the ghost stories of the Gothic to the zombies and vampires of twenty-first-century popular literature, from Mrs Radcliffe to Ms Rowling, the fantastic has been popular with readers. Since Tolkien and his many imitators, however, it has become a major publishing phenomenon. In this volume, critics and authors of fantasy look at its history since the Enlightenment, introduce readers to some of the different codes for the reading and understanding of fantasy, and examine some of the many varieties and subgenres of fantasy; from magical realism at the more literary end of the genre, to paranormal romance at the more popular end. The book is edited by the same pair who produced The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction (winner of a Hugo Award in 2005).

The Cambridge Companion to Gothic Fiction


Author: Jerrold E. Hogle
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521794664
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 327
View: 7636

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Provides a survey of literary gothicism from its origins in Renaissance revenge tragedy, through eighteenth century novels and plays, to nineteenth and twentieth century film and fiction.

The Cambridge Companion to Literature and the Posthuman


Author: Bruce Clarke,Manuela Rossini
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107086205
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 280
View: 6186

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This book gathers diverse critical treatments from fifteen scholars of the posthuman and posthumanism together in a single volume.

The Cambridge Companion to American Gothic


Author: Jeffrey Andrew Weinstock
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107117143
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 268
View: 6598

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This Companion offers a thorough overview of the diversity of the American Gothic tradition from its origins to the present.

Frankenstein

A Cultural History
Author: Susan Tyler Hitchcock
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393061444
Category: History
Page: 392
View: 3752

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A lighthearted history of the Frankenstein myth traces its origins, evaluates the shifts in period morality and science that shaped the story and its various interpretations, and considers the invocations of the tale in various formats.

The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction


Author: Edward James,Farah Mendlesohn
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521016575
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 295
View: 8809

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Science fiction is at the intersection of numerous fields. It is a literature which draws on popular culture, and which engages in speculation about science, history, and all types of social relations. This volume brings together essays by scholars and practitioners of science fiction, which look at the genre from these different angles. It examines science fiction from Thomas More to the present day, and introduces important critical approaches including Marxism, postmodernism, feminism and queer theory. A number of well-known science fiction writers contribute to this volume.

The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and the Environment


Author: Timothy Clark
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 113949516X
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: N.A
View: 5219

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The degrading environment of the planet is something that touches everyone. This 2011 book offers an introductory overview of literary and cultural criticism that concerns environmental crisis in some form. Both as a way of reading texts and as a theoretical approach to culture more generally, 'ecocriticism' is a varied and fast-changing set of practices which challenges inherited thinking and practice in the reading of literature and culture. This introduction defines what ecocriticism is, its methods, arguments and concepts, and will enable students to look at texts in a wholly new way. Boxed sections explain key critical terms and contemporary debates in the field with 'hands-on' examples and comparisons. Timothy Clark's thoughtful approach makes this an ideal first encounter with environmental readings of literature.

A Companion to Science Fiction


Author: David Seed
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1405144580
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 612
View: 4964

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A Companion to Science Fiction assembles essays by an international range of scholars which discuss the contexts, themes and methods used by science fiction writers. This Companion conveys the scale and variety of science fiction. Shows how science fiction has been used as a means of debating cultural issues. Essays by an international range of scholars discuss the contexts, themes and methods used by science fiction writers. Addresses general topics, such as the history and origins of the genre, its engagement with science and gender, and national variations of science fiction around the English-speaking world. Maps out connections between science fiction, television, the cinema, virtual reality technology, and other aspects of the culture. Includes a section focusing on major figures, such as H.G. Wells, Arthur C. Clarke, and Ursula Le Guin. Offers close readings of particular novels, from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein to Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale.

Frankenstein, Creation and Monstrosity


Author: Stephen Bann
Publisher: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 9780948462603
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 215
View: 1719

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Elizabeth A. Kaye specializes in communications as part of her coaching and consulting practice. She has edited Requirements for Certification since the 2000-01 edition.

A Routledge Literary Sourcebook on Mary Shelley's Frankenstein


Author: Timothy Morton
Publisher: Presbyterian Publishing Corp
ISBN: 9780415227322
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 202
View: 7525

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Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is one of the most widely studied works of English literature, and Frankenstein's creature is a key figure in the popular imagination. This sourcebook examines Mary Shelley's novel within its literary and cultural contexts, bringing together material on: *the contexts from which Frankenstein emerged *the novel's early reception *adaptation and performance of the work (from theatre to pop music) *recent criticism. All documents are discussed and explained. The volume also includes offers carefully annotated key passages from the novel itself and concludes with a list of recommended editions and further reading, to allow readers to pursue their study in the areas that interest them most. This sourcebook provides an ideal orientation to the novel, its reception history and the critical material that surrounds it.

The Cambridge Companion to Fiction in the Romantic Period


Author: Richard Maxwell,Katie Trumpener
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139827911
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: N.A
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While poetry has been the genre most closely associated with the Romantic period, the novel of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries has attracted many more readers and students in recent years. Its canon has been widened to include less well known authors alongside Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Maria Edgeworth and Thomas Love Peacock. Over the last generation, especially, a remarkable range of popular works from the period have been re-discovered and reread intensively. This Companion offers an overview of British fiction written between roughly the mid-1760s and the early 1830s and is an ideal guide to the major authors, historical and cultural contexts, and later critical reception. The contributors to this volume represent the most up-to-date directions in scholarship, charting the ways in which the period's social, political and intellectual redefinitions created new fictional subjects, forms and audiences.

The Cambridge Companion to Byron


Author: Drummond Bone
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521786768
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 305
View: 8918

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Byron's life and work have fascinated readers around the world for two hundred years, but it is the complex interaction between his art and his politics, beliefs and sexuality that has attracted so many modern critics and students. In three sections devoted to the historical, textual and literary contexts of Byron's life and times, these specially commissioned essays by a range of eminent Byron scholars provide a compelling picture of the diversity of Byron's writings. The essays cover topics such as Byron's interest in the East, his relationship to the publishing world, his attitudes to gender, his use of Shakespeare and eighteenth-century literature, and his acute fit in a post-modernist world. This 2004 Companion provides an invaluable resource for students and scholars, including a chronology and a guide to further reading.

In Frankenstein's shadow

myth, monstrosity, and nineteenth-century writing
Author: Chris Baldick
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780198122494
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 207
View: 6881

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This book surveys the early history of one of our most important modern myths: the story of Frankenstein and the monster he created from dismembered corpses, as it appeared in fictional and other writings before its translation to the cinema screen. It examines the range of meanings whichMary Shelley's Frankenstein offers in the light of the political images of `monstrosity' generated by the French Revolution. Later chapters trace the myth's analogues and protean transformations in subsequent writings, from the tales of Hoffmann and Hawthorne to the novels of Dickens, Melville,Conrad, and Lawrence, taking in the historical and political writings of Carlyle and Marx as well as the science fiction of Stevenson and Wells. The author shows that while the myth did come to be applied metaphorically to technological development, its most powerful associations have centred onrelationships between people, in the family, in work, and in politics.

Monstrous Progeny

A History of the Frankenstein Narratives
Author: Lester D. Friedman,Allison B. Kavey
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 081357370X
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 256
View: 9552

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Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel Frankenstein is its own type of monster mythos that will not die, a corpus whose parts keep getting harvested to animate new artistic creations. What makes this tale so adaptable and so resilient that, nearly 200 years later, it remains vitally relevant in a culture radically different from the one that spawned its birth? Monstrous Progeny takes readers on a fascinating exploration of the Frankenstein family tree, tracing the literary and intellectual roots of Shelley’s novel from the sixteenth century and analyzing the evolution of the book’s figures and themes into modern productions that range from children’s cartoons to pornography. Along the way, media scholar Lester D. Friedman and historian Allison B. Kavey examine the adaptation and evolution of Victor Frankenstein and his monster across different genres and in different eras. In doing so, they demonstrate how Shelley’s tale and its characters continue to provide crucial reference points for current debates about bioethics, artificial intelligence, cyborg lifeforms, and the limits of scientific progress. Blending an extensive historical overview with a detailed analysis of key texts, the authors reveal how the Frankenstein legacy arose from a series of fluid intellectual contexts and continues to pulsate through an extraordinary body of media products. Both thought-provoking and entertaining, Monstrous Progeny offers a lively look at an undying and significant cultural phenomenon.

The Cambridge Companion to ‘Dracula'


Author: Roger Luckhurst
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107153174
Category: Fiction
Page: 240
View: 4416

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This celebrated Gothic novel is explored through essays providing critical, historical, anthropological, philosophical and intellectual contexts that serve to further the understanding and appreciation of Dracula in all its many guises. Together the essays offer exciting new critical approaches to the most famous vampire in literature and film.

The Cambridge Companion to George Eliot


Author: George Levine
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 113982614X
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: N.A
View: 758

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This volume of specially-commissioned essays provides accessible introductions to all aspects of George Eliot's writing by some of the most distinguished new and established scholars and critics of Victorian literature. The essays are comprehensive, scholarly and lucidly written, and at the same time offer original insights into the work of one of the most important Victorian novelists, and into her complex and often scandalous career. Discussions of her life, the social, political, and intellectual grounding of her work, and her relation to Victorian feminism provide valuable criticism of everything from her early journalism to her poetry. Each essay contributes to a new understanding of the great fiction, from Adam Bede and The Mill on the Floss to Daniel Deronda. With its supplementary material, including a chronology and a guide to further reading, this Companion is an invaluable tool for scholars and students alike.

Science Fiction: A Very Short Introduction


Author: David Seed
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199557454
Category: Fiction
Page: 147
View: 5470

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David Seed examines how science fiction has emerged as a popular genre of literature in the 20th century, and discusses it in relation to themes such as science and technology, space, aliens, utopias, and gender. Looking at some of the most influential writers of the genre he also considers the wider social and political issues it raises.

The New Annotated Frankenstein


Author: Mary Shelley
Publisher: Liveright Publishing
ISBN: 087140950X
Category: Fiction
Page: 416
View: 5715

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Two centuries after its original publication, Mary Shelley’s classic tale of gothic horror comes to vivid life in "what may very well be the best presentation of the novel" to date (Guillermo del Toro). "Remarkably, a nineteen-year-old, writing her first novel, penned a tale that combines tragedy, morality, social commentary, and a thoughtful examination of the very nature of knowledge," writes best-selling author Leslie S. Klinger in his foreword to The New Annotated Frankenstein. Despite its undeniable status as one of the most influential works of fiction ever written, Mary Shelley’s novel is often reductively dismissed as the wellspring for tacky monster films or as a cautionary tale about experimental science gone haywire. Now, two centuries after the first publication of Frankenstein, Klinger revives Shelley’s gothic masterpiece by reproducing her original text with the most lavishly illustrated and comprehensively annotated edition to date. Featuring over 200 illustrations and nearly 1,000 annotations, this sumptuous volume recaptures Shelley’s early nineteenth-century world with historical precision and imaginative breadth, tracing the social and political roots of the author’s revolutionary brand of Romanticism. Braiding together decades of scholarship with his own keen insights, Klinger recounts Frankenstein’s indelible contributions to the realms of science fiction, feminist theory, and modern intellectual history—not to mention film history and popular culture. The result of Klinger’s exhaustive research is a multifaceted portrait of one of Western literature’s most divinely gifted prodigies, a young novelist who defied her era’s restrictions on female ambitions by independently supporting herself and her children as a writer and editor. Born in a world of men in the midst of a political and an emerging industrial revolution, Shelley crafted a horror story that, beyond its incisive commentary on her own milieu, is widely recognized as the first work of science fiction. The daughter of a pioneering feminist and an Enlightenment philosopher, Shelley lived and wrote at the center of British Romanticism, the “exuberant, young movement” that rebelled against tradition and reason and "with a rebellious scream gave birth to a world of gods and monsters" (del Toro). Following his best-selling The New Annotated H. P. Lovecraft and The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes, Klinger not only considers Shelley’s original 1818 text but, for the first time in any annotated volume, traces the effects of her significant revisions in the 1823 and 1831 editions. With an afterword by renowned literary scholar Anne K. Mellor, The New Annotated Frankenstein celebrates the prescient genius and undying legacy of the world’s "first truly modern myth." The New Annotated Frankenstein includes: Nearly 1,000 notes that provide information and historical context on every aspect of Frankenstein and of Mary Shelley’s life Over 200 illustrations, including original artwork from the 1831 edition and dozens of photographs of real-world locations that appear in the novel Extensive listings of films and theatrical adaptations An introduction by Guillermo del Toro and an afterword by Anne K. Mellor