The Black Penguin


Author: Andrew Evans
Publisher: Living Out: Gay and Lesbian Au
ISBN: 9780299311407
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 264
View: 1477

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An outcast gay Mormon travels by bus from his Washington, DC, home to Antarctica, in a wild yet touching adventure across some of the most astonishing landscapes on Earth.

Bryher

Two Novels: Development And Two Selves
Author: Bryher
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 9780299167738
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 336
View: 2693

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Bryher (born Annie Winifred Ellerman) is perhaps best known today as the lifelong partner of the poet H.D. She was, however, a central figure in modernist and avant-garde cultural experimentation in the early twentieth century; a prolific producer of poetry, novels, autobiography, and criticism; and an intimate and patron of such modernist artists as Gertrude Stein, Marianne Moore, and Dorothy Richardson. Bryher’s own path-breaking writing has remained largely neglected, long out of print, and inaccessible to those interested in her oeuvre. Now, for the first time since their original publication in the early 1920s, two of Bryher's pioneering works of fictionalized autobiography, titled Development and Two Selves, are reprinted in one volume for a new audience of readers, scholars, and critics. Blending poetry, prose, and autobiographical details, Development and Two Selves together constitute a compelling bildungsroman that is among the first ever to follow a young woman's process of coming out. Through the fictionalized character Nancy, the novels trace Bryher’s life through her childhood and young adulthood, giving the reader an account of the development of a unique lesbian, feminist, and modernist consciousness. Development and Two Selves recover significant work by one of the first experimenters of the modernist movement and are a welcome reintroduction of the enigmatic Bryher.

Gay Mormon Dad


Author: Chad Anderson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780692050712
Category:
Page: 226
View: 7810

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Chad Anderson grew up gay in a large Mormon family. After years of trying to conform to religious standards, which promised a cure for homosexuality, he married and had children before finally coming out of the closet. Gay Mormon Dad is his story of finally learning to love himself in a complicated world. Chad currently resides with his two sons in Salt Lake City, Utah, where he works as a social worker and a writer.

The Truth Is . . .

My Life in Love and Music
Author: Melissa Etheridge,Laura Morton
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0307765644
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 256
View: 4966

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Since she first burst onto the international music scene, Melissa Etheridge has released seven albums that have sold more than 25 million copies worldwide, garnering not only public adoration for her uncompromising honesty but numerous critical awards, including two Grammys and the prestigious ASCAP Songwriter of the Year award. The Truth Is . . . is a highly charged autobiography—a bold and unflinching account of an extraordinary life that Melissa describes as only she can: from her Kansas roots, through her early love of music, to her brilliant rise to superstardom in a male-dominated rock world. Melissa openly discusses the massive impact of her publicly coming out, a revelation that only increased her popularity, making her a highly visible spokesperson for the gay and lesbian community. The Truth Is . . . shares Melissa Etheridge’s fascinating story with unprecedented candor and insight. From the Trade Paperback edition.

A Queer History of the United States


Author: Michael Bronski
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807044660
Category: History
Page: 312
View: 1728

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Winner of a 2012 Stonewall Book Award in nonfiction The first book to cover the entirety of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender history, from pre-1492 to the present. In the 1620s, Thomas Morton broke from Plymouth Colony and founded Merrymount, which celebrated same-sex desire, atheism, and interracial marriage. Transgender evangelist Jemima Wilkinson, in the early 1800s, changed her name to “Publick Universal Friend,” refused to use pronouns, fought for gender equality, and led her own congregation in upstate New York. In the mid-nineteenth century, internationally famous Shakespearean actor Charlotte Cushman led an openly lesbian life, including a well-publicized “female marriage.” And in the late 1920s, Augustus Granville Dill was fired by W. E. B. Du Bois from the NAACP’s magazine the Crisis after being arrested for a homosexual encounter. These are just a few moments of queer history that Michael Bronski highlights in this groundbreaking book. Intellectually dynamic and endlessly provocative, A Queer History of the United States is more than a “who’s who” of queer history: it is a book that radically challenges how we understand American history. Drawing upon primary documents, literature, and cultural histories, noted scholar and activist Michael Bronski charts the breadth of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender history, from 1492 to the 1990s, and has written a testament to how the LGBT experience has profoundly shaped our country, culture, and history. A Queer History of the United States abounds with startling examples of unknown or often ignored aspects of American history—the ineffectiveness of sodomy laws in the colonies, the prevalence of cross-dressing women soldiers in the Civil War, the impact of new technologies on LGBT life in the nineteenth century, and how rock music and popular culture were, in large part, responsible for the devastating backlash against gay rights in the late 1970s. Most striking, Bronski documents how, over centuries, various incarnations of social purity movements have consistently attempted to regulate all sexuality, including fantasies, masturbation, and queer sex. Resisting these efforts, same-sex desire flourished and helped make America what it is today. At heart, A Queer History of the United States is simply about American history. It is a book that will matter both to LGBT people and heterosexuals. This engrossing and revelatory history will make readers appreciate just how queer America really is. From the Hardcover edition.

Other Russias


Author: Victoria Lomasko
Publisher: Particular Books
ISBN: 9781846149511
Category:
Page: 320
View: 5659

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From a renowned graphic artist and activist, an incredible portrait of life in Russia today 'Victoria Lomasko's gritty, street-level view of the great Russian people masterfully intertwines quiet desperation with open defiance. Her drawings have an on-the-spot immediacy that I envy. She is one of the brave ones' - Joe Sacco, author of Palestine What does it mean to live in Russia today? What is it like to grow up in a forgotten city, to be a migrant worker or to grow old and seek solace in the Orthodox church? For the past eight years, graphic artist and activist Victoria Lomasko has been travelling around Russia and talking to people as she draws their stories. She spent time in dying villages where schoolteachers outnumber students; she stayed with sex workers in the city of Nizhny Novgorod; she went to juvenile prisons and spoke to kids who have no contact with the outside world; and she attended every major political rally in Moscow. The result is an extraordinary portrait of Russia in the Putin years -- a country full of people who have been left behind, many of whom are determined to fight for their rights and for progress against impossible odds. Empathetic, honest, funny, and often devastating, Lomasko's portraits show us a side of Russia that is hardly ever seen.

Gay Rebel of the Harlem Renaissance

Selections from the Work of Richard Bruce Nugent
Author: Bruce Nugent,Thomas H. Wirth
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822329138
Category: Art
Page: 293
View: 1017

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One of the first gay African Americans to openly pronounce his homosexuality speaks out on the Harlem Renaissance through selections from his writing and his art. Simultaneous.

Trans Britain

Our Journey from the Shadows
Author: Christine Burns
Publisher: Unbound Publishing
ISBN: 1783524707
Category: Social Science
Page: 400
View: 2317

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Over the last five years, transgender people have seemed to burst into the public eye: Time declared 2014 a ‘trans tipping point’, while American Vogue named 2015 ‘the year of trans visibility’. From our television screens to the ballot box, transgender people have suddenly become part of the zeitgeist. This apparently overnight emergence, though, is just the latest stage in a long and varied history. The renown of Paris Lees and Hari Nef has its roots in the efforts of those who struggled for equality before them, but were met with indifference – and often outright hostility – from mainstream society. Trans Britain chronicles this journey in the words of those who were there to witness a marginalised community grow into the visible phenomenon we recognise today: activists, film-makers, broadcasters, parents, an actress, a rock musician and a priest, among many others. Here is everything you always wanted to know about the background of the trans community, but never knew how to ask.

Straight Jacket


Author: Matthew Todd
Publisher: Black Swan
ISBN: 9780552778404
Category: Gay men
Page: 400
View: 2871

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Straight Jacket is a revolutionary clarion call for gay men, the wider LGBT community, their friends and family. Part memoir, part ground-breaking polemic, it looks beneath the shiny facade of contemporary gay culture and asks if gay people are as happy as they could be--and if not, why not? Meticulously researched, courageous and life-affirming, Straight Jacket offers invaluable practical advice on how to overcome a range of difficult issues. It also recognizes that this is a watershed moment, a piercing wake-up-call-to-arms for the gay and wider community to acknowledge the importance of supporting all young people--and helping older people to transform their experience and finally get the lives they really want.

My Two Moms

Lessons of Love, Strength, and what Makes a Family
Author: Zach Wahls
Publisher: Avery
ISBN: 1592407633
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 236
View: 6424

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An advocate and son of same-gender parents recounts his famed address to the Iowa House of Representatives on civil unions, and describes his positive experiences of growing up in an alternative family in spite of prejudice.

Out and Proud in Chicago

An Overview of the City's Gay Community
Author: Tracy Baim
Publisher: Agate Publishing
ISBN: 9781572846432
Category: History
Page: 224
View: 2732

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Out and Proud in Chicago takes readers through the long and rich history of the city's LGBT community. Lavishly illustrated with color and black-and white-photographs, the book draws on a wealth of scholarly, historical, and journalistic sources. Individual sections cover the early days of the 1800s to World War II, the challenging community-building years from World War II to the 1960s, the era of gay liberation and AIDS from the 1970s to the 1990s, and on to the city's vital, post-liberation present.

No Ashes in the Fire

Coming of Age Black and Free in America
Author: Darnell L Moore
Publisher: Nation Books
ISBN: 1568589492
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 256
View: 6888

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From a leading journalist and activist comes a brave, beautifully wrought memoir. When Darnell Moore was fourteen, three boys from his neighborhood tried to set him on fire. They cornered him while he was walking home from school, harassed him because they thought he was gay, and poured a jug of gasoline on him. He escaped, but just barely. It wasn't the last time he would face death. Three decades later, Moore is an award-winning writer, a leading Black Lives Matter activist, and an advocate for justice and liberation. In No Ashes in the Fire, he shares the journey taken by that scared, bullied teenager who not only survived, but found his calling. Moore's transcendence over the myriad forces of repression that faced him is a testament to the grace and care of the people who loved him, and to his hometown, Camden, NJ, scarred and ignored but brimming with life. Moore reminds us that liberation is possible if we commit ourselves to fighting for it, and if we dream and create futures where those who survive on society's edges can thrive. No Ashes in the Fire is a story of beauty and hope-and an honest reckoning with family, with place, and with what it means to be free.

Boots of Leather, Slippers of Gold

The History of a Lesbian Community
Author: Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy,Madeline D. Davis
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317663969
Category: Social Science
Page: 478
View: 5998

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Boots of Leather, Slippers of Gold traces the evolution of the lesbian community in Buffalo, New York from the mid-1930s up to the early 1960s. Drawing upon the oral histories of 45 women, it is the first comprehensive history of a working-class lesbian community. These poignant and complex stories show how black and white working-class lesbians, although living under oppressive circumstances, nevertheless became powerful agents of historical change. Kennedy and Davis provide a unique insider's perspective on butch-fem culture and argue that the roots of gay and lesbian liberation are found specifically in the determined resistance of working-class lesbians. This 20th anniversary edition republishes the book for a new generation of readers. It includes a new preface in which the authors reflect on where the last 20 years have taken them. For anyone interested in lesbian life during the 1940s and 1950s, or in the dynamics of butch-fem culture, this study remains the one that set the highest standard for all oral histories and ethnographies of lesbian communities anywhere.

The Auto/biographical I

The Theory and Practice of Feminist Auto/biography
Author: Liz Stanley
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 9780719046490
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 289
View: 1075

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This feminist literary study discusses postmodern ideas about the self, particularly about the way in which selves are constructed by biography and autobiography. The author particularly examines the manner in which women write about themselves.

The Blind Masseuse

A Traveler's Memoir from Costa Rica to Cambodia
Author: Alden Jones
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres
ISBN: 0299295737
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 160
View: 1531

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Through personal journeys both interior and across the globe, Alden Jones investigates what motivates us to travel abroad in search of the unfamiliar. By way of explorations to Costa Rica, Bolivia, Nicaragua, Cuba, Burma, Cambodia, Egypt, and around the world on a ship, Jones chronicles her experience as a young American traveler while pondering her role as an outsider in the cultures she temporarily inhabits. Her wanderlust fuels a strong, high-adventure story and, much in the vein of classic travel literature, Jones's picaresque tale of personal evolution informs her own transitions, rites of passage, and understandings of her place as a citizen of the world. With sharp insight and stylish prose, Jones asks: Is there a right or wrong way to travel? The Blind Masseuse concludes that there is, but that it's not always black and white. Gold Winner for Travel Essays, Foreword Books of the Year Gold Medal for Travel Essays, Independent Publisher Book Awards Winner, Bisexual Book Awards, Bisexual Biography/Memoir Category Finalist, Housatonic Book Awards Longlist of eight, PEN/Diamonstein Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay Finalist, Travel Book or Guide Award, North American Travel Journalists Association

The Seductions of Biography


Author: David Suchoff,Mary Rhiel
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134714491
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 9456

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First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

A Queer and Pleasant Danger

A Memoir
Author: Kate Bornstein
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807001651
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 258
View: 1118

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Presents the life of a Jewish boy who joined the Church of Scientology and left twelve years later, ultimately transitioning to a woman and becoming a civil rights activist and gender outlaw.

The Well Of Loneliness


Author: Radclyffe Hall
Publisher: Radclyffe Hall
ISBN: 889254182X
Category: Literary Collections
Page: N.A
View: 8058

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Radclyffe Hall (born Marguerite Radclyffe Hall on 12 August 1880 – 7 October 1943) was an English poet and author, best known for the novel The Well of Loneliness. The novel has become a groundbreaking work in lesbian literature. The Well of Loneliness is a 1928 lesbian novel by the British author Radclyffe Hall. It follows the life of Stephen Gordon, an Englishwoman from an upper-class family whose "sexual inversion" (homosexuality) is apparent from an early age. She finds love with Mary Llewellyn, whom she meets while serving as an ambulance driver in World War I, but their happiness together is marred by social isolation and rejection, which Hall depicts as having a debilitating effect on inverts. The novel portrays inversion as a natural, God-given state and makes an explicit plea: "Give us also the right to our existence".

And Tango Makes Three


Author: Justin Richardson,Peter Parnell
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0857073842
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 32
View: 8007

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Roy and Silo are just like the other penguin couples at the zoo - they bow to each other, walk together and swim together. But Roy and Silo are a little bit different - they're both boys. Then, one day, when Mr Gramzay the zookeeper finds them trying to hatch astone, he realises that it may be time for Roy and Silo to become parents for real.

Autobiography of My Hungers


Author: Rigoberto González
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres
ISBN: 0299292533
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 113
View: 9826

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Rigoberto González, author of the critically acclaimed memoir Butterfly Boy: Memories of a Chicano Mariposa, takes a second piercing look at his past through a startling new lens: hunger. The need for sustenance originating in childhood poverty, the adolescent emotional need for solace and comfort, the adult desire for a larger world, another lover, a different body—all are explored by González in a series of heartbreaking and poetic vignettes. Each vignette is a defining moment of self-awareness, every moment an important step in a lifelong journey toward clarity, knowledge, and the nourishment that comes in various forms—even "the smallest biggest joys" help piece together a complex portrait of a gay man of color who at last defines himself by what he learns, not by what he yearns for.