The Age of Homespun

Objects and Stories in the Creation of an American Myth
Author: Laurel Thatcher Ulrich
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307416860
Category: Social Science
Page: 512
View: 8992

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They began their existence as everyday objects, but in the hands of award-winning historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, fourteen domestic items from preindustrial America–ranging from a linen tablecloth to an unfinished sock–relinquish their stories and offer profound insights into our history. In an age when even meals are rarely made from scratch, homespun easily acquires the glow of nostalgia. The objects Ulrich investigates unravel those simplified illusions, revealing important clues to the culture and people who made them. Ulrich uses an Indian basket to explore the uneasy coexistence of native and colonial Americans. A piece of silk embroidery reveals racial and class distinctions, and two old spinning wheels illuminate the connections between colonial cloth-making and war. Pulling these divergent threads together, Ulrich demonstrates how early Americans made, used, sold, and saved textiles in order to assert their identities, shape relationships, and create history. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution


Author: Edward G. Gray,Jane Kamensky
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199324034
Category: History
Page: 696
View: 5142

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The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution draws on a wealth of new scholarship to create a vibrant dialogue among varied approaches to the revolution that made the United States. In thirty-three essays written by authorities on the period, the Handbook brings to life the diverse multitudes of colonial North America and their extraordinary struggles before, during, and after the eight-year-long civil war that secured the independence of thirteen rebel colonies from their erstwhile colonial parent. The chapters explore battles and diplomacy, economics and finance, law and culture, politics and society, gender, race, and religion. Its diverse cast of characters includes ordinary farmers and artisans, free and enslaved African Americans, Indians, and British and American statesmen and military leaders. In addition to expanding the Revolution's who, the Handbook broadens its where, portraying an event that far transcended the boundaries of what was to become the United States. It offers readers an American Revolution whose impact ranged far beyond the thirteen colonies. The Handbook's range of interpretive and methodological approaches captures the full scope of current revolutionary-era scholarship. Its authors, British and American scholars spanning several generations, include social, cultural, military, and imperial historians, as well as those who study politics, diplomacy, literature, gender, and sexuality. Together and separately, these essays demonstrate that the American Revolution remains a vibrant and inviting a subject of inquiry. Nothing comparable has been published in decades.

Talking Shop

The Language of Craft in an Age of Consumption
Author: Peter Betjemann
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 081393169X
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 280
View: 5458

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Describing everything from bread and cappuccinos to mass-market furnishings, a language of the "artisanal" saturates our culture today. That language, Peter Betjemann proposes, has a rich and specifiable history. Between 1840 and 1920, the cultural appetite for handmade chairs, tables, cabinets, and other material odds and ends flowed through narrative and texts as much as through dusty workshops or the physical surfaces of clay, wood, or metal. Judged by classic axioms about labor’s virtue—axioms originating with Plato and foundational to modern theories of workmanship—the vigorous life of craft as represented in these texts might seem a secondhand version of an ideal and purposeful activity. But Talking Shop celebrates these texts as a cultural phenomenon of their own. In the first book to consider the literary representation of craft rather than of labor in general, Peter Betjemann asks how nineteenth and early twentieth-century craftspeople, writers, and consumers managed craft’s traditional attachment to physical objects and activities while also celebrating craft in iconic, emblematic, preeminently textual terms. The durable model of workmanship that was created around correlations of craft and narrative, physical process and representation, and body and text blurred the boundaries between craft and its consumption. Discussing a wide range of material from fiction and essays to artifacts, the book explores how the era paved the way for the vitality and the viability of a language of craft in much later decades.

The Making of Home

The 500-year story of how our houses became homes
Author: Judith Flanders
Publisher: Atlantic Books Ltd
ISBN: 1782393781
Category: Social Science
Page: 368
View: 1732

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The idea that 'home' is a special place, a separate place, a place where we can be our true selves, is so obvious to us today that we barely pause to think about it. But, as Judith Flanders shows in this revealing book, 'home' is a relatively new concept. When in 1900 Dorothy assured the citizens of Oz that 'There is no place like home', she was expressing a view that was a culmination of 300 years of economic, physical and emotional change. In The Making of Home, Flanders traces the evolution of the house across northern Europe and America from the sixteenth to the early twentieth century, and paints a striking picture of how the homes we know today differ from homes through history. The transformation of houses into homes, she argues, was not a private matter, but an essential ingredient in the rise of capitalism and the birth of the Industrial Revolution. Without 'home', the modern world as we know it would not exist, and as Flanders charts the development of ordinary household objects - from cutlery, chairs and curtains, to fitted kitchens, plumbing and windows - she also peels back the myths that surround some of our most basic assumptions, including our entire notion of what it is that makes a family. As full of fascinating detail as her previous bestsellers, The Making of Home is also a book teeming with original and provocative ideas.

Jolly Fellows

Male Milieus in Nineteenth-Century America
Author: Richard Stott
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801897955
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 672

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Jolly Fellows proposes a new interpretation of nineteenth-century American culture and society and will inform future work on masculinity during this period.

The Fragile Fabric of Union

Cotton, Federal Politics, and the Global Origins of the Civil War
Author: Brian Schoen
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 0801893038
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 369
View: 4384

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In this fresh study Brian Schoen views the Deep South and its cotton industry from a global perspective, revisiting old assumptions and providing new insights into the region, the political history of the United States, and the causes of the Civil War. Schoen takes a unique and broad approach. Rather than seeing the Deep South and its planters as isolated from larger intellectual, economic, and political developments, he places the region firmly within them. In doing so, he demonstrates that the region’s prominence within the modern world—and not its opposition to it—indelibly shaped Southern history. The place of "King Cotton" in the sectional thinking and budding nationalism of the Lower South seems obvious enough, but Schoen reexamines the ever-shifting landscape of international trade from the 1780s through the eve of the Civil War. He argues that the Southern cotton trade was essential to the European economy, seemingly worth any price for Europeans to protect and maintain, and something to defend aggressively in the halls of Congress. This powerful association gave the Deep South the confidence to ultimately secede from the Union. By integrating the history of the region with global events, Schoen reveals how white farmers, planters, and merchants created a "Cotton South," preserved its profitability for many years, and ensured its dominance in the international raw cotton markets. The story he tells reveals the opportunities and costs of cotton production for the Lower South and the United States.

The Ties That Buy

Women and Commerce in Revolutionary America
Author: Ellen Hartigan-O'Connor
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812221591
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 253
View: 8677

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The Ties That Buy traces the lives of black and white women in early America to reveal how they used residence, work, credit, and money to shape consumer culture precisely at a time when the politics of the marketplace gained national significance.

The Ashgate Companion to the History of Textile Workers, 1650–2000


Author: Dr Elise van Nederveen Meerkerk,Mr Els Hiemstra-Kuperus,Prof Dr Lex Heerma van Voss
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409480674
Category: History
Page: 860
View: 626

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This impressive collection offers the first systematic global and comparative history of textile workers over the course of 350 years. This period covers the major changes in wool and cotton production, and the global picture from pre-industrial times through to the twentieth century. After an introduction, the first part of the book is divided into twenty national studies on textile production over the period 1650–2000. To make them useful tools for international comparisons, each national overview is based on a consistent framework that defines the topics and issues to be treated in each chapter. The countries described have been selected to included the major historic producers of woollen and cotton fabrics, and the diversity of global experience, and include not only European nations, but also Argentina, Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Japan, Mexico, Turkey, Uruguay and the USA. The second part of the book consists of ten comparative papers on topics including globalization and trade, organization of production, space, identity, workplace, institutions, production relations, gender, ethnicity and the textile firm. These are based on the national overviews and additional literature, and will help apply current interdisciplinary and cultural concerns to a subject traditionally viewed largely through a social and economic history lens. Whilst offering a unique reference source for anyone interested in the history of a particular country's textile industry, the true strength of this project lies in its capacity of international comparison. By providing global comparative studies of key textile industries and workers, both geographically and thematically, this book provides a comprehensive and contemporary analysis of a major element of the world's economy. This allows historians to challenge many of the received ideas about globalization, for instance, highlighting how global competition for lower production costs is by no means a uniquely modern issue, and has been a feature of textile production for much of the last 350 years. As such this collection will be welcomed by all scholars engaged in the history of the textile industry and international trade.

Contexts of Nursing

An Introduction
Author: John Daly,Sandra Speedy,Debra Jackson
Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences
ISBN: 0729579255
Category: Medical
Page: 400
View: 7472

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Contexts of Nursing 3e builds on the strengths of previous editions and continues to provide nursing students with comprehensive coverage of core ideas and perspectives underpinning the practice of nursing. The new edition has been thoroughly revised and updated. New material on Cultural Awareness and Contemporary Approaches in Nursing has been introduced to reflect the realities of practice. Nursing themes are discussed from an Australian and New Zealand perspective and are supported by illustrated examples and evidence. Each chapter focuses on an area of study within the undergraduate nursing program and the new edition continues its discussions on history, culture, ethics, law, technology, and professional issues within the field of nursing. update and revised with strong contributions from a wide range of experienced educators from around Australia & New Zealand new Chapter 17 Becoming a Nurse Leader has been introduced into the third edition to highlight the ongoing need of management in practice Chapter 20 Cultural Awareness Nurses working with indigenous people is a new chapter which explores cultural awareness, safety and competence Chapter 22 Using informatics to expand awareness engages the reader on the benefits of using technology evidence-based approach is integrated throughout the text learning objectives, key words and reflective questions are included in all chapters

Between Two Worlds

How the English Became Americans
Author: Malcolm Gaskill
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191653837
Category: History
Page: 480
View: 7828

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Between Two Worlds is a story teeming with people on the move, making decisions, indulging or resisting their desires and dreams. In the seventeenth century a quarter of a million men, women, and children left England's shores for America. Some were explorers and merchants, others soldiers and missionaries; many were fugitives from poverty and persecution. All, in their own way, were adventurers, risking their lives and fortunes to make something of themselves overseas. They irrevocably changed the land and indigenous peoples they encountered - and their new world changed them. But that was only half the story. The plantations established from Maine to the Caribbean needed support at home, especially royal endorsement and money, which made adventurers of English monarchs and investors too. Attitudes to America were crucial, and evolved as the colonies grew in size, prosperity, and self-confidence. Meanwhile, for those who had crossed the ocean, America forced people to rethink the country in which they had been raised, and to which they remained attached after emigration. In tandem with new ideas about the New World, migrants pondered their English mother country's traditions and achievements, its problems and its uncertain future in an age of war and revolution. Using hundreds of letters, journals, reports, pamphlets and contemporary books, Between Two Worlds recreates this fascinating transatlantic history - one which has often been neglected or misunderstood on both sides of the Atlantic in the centuries since.

Love of Freedom

Black Women in Colonial and Revolutionary New England
Author: Catherine Adams,Elizabeth H. Pleck
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199779833
Category: Social Science
Page: 280
View: 1764

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They baked New England's Thanksgiving pies, preached their faith to crowds of worshippers, spied for the patriots during the Revolution, wrote that human bondage was a sin, and demanded reparations for slavery. Black women in colonial and revolutionary New England sought not only legal emancipation from slavery but defined freedom more broadly to include spiritual, familial, and economic dimensions. Hidden behind the banner of achieving freedom was the assumption that freedom meant affirming black manhood The struggle for freedom in New England was different for men than for women. Black men in colonial and revolutionary New England were struggling for freedom from slavery and for the right to patriarchal control of their own families. Women had more complicated desires, seeking protection and support in a male headed household while also wanting personal liberty. Eventually women who were former slaves began to fight for dignity and respect for womanhood and access to schooling for black children.

Unbecoming British

How Revolutionary America Became a Postcolonial Nation
Author: Kariann Akemi Yokota
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199779910
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 6833

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What can homespun cloth, stuffed birds, quince jelly, and ginseng reveal about the formation of early American national identity? In this wide-ranging and bold new interpretation of American history and its Founding Fathers, Kariann Akemi Yokota shows that political independence from Britain fueled anxieties among the Americans about their cultural inferiority and continuing dependence on the mother country. Caught between their desire to emulate the mother country and an awareness that they lived an ocean away on the periphery of the known world, they went to great lengths to convince themselves and others of their refinement. Taking a transnational approach to American history, Yokota examines a wealth of evidence from geography, the decorative arts, intellectual history, science, and technology to underscore that the process of "unbecoming British" was not an easy one. Indeed, the new nation struggled to define itself economically, politically, and culturally in what could be called America's postcolonial period. Out of this confusion of hope and exploitation, insecurity and vision, a uniquely American identity emerged.

The Oxford Handbook of the History of Consumption


Author: Frank Trentmann
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0199561214
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 695
View: 4512

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The Oxford Handbook of the History of Consumption offers a timely overview of how our understanding of consumption in history has changed in the last generation.

Plucked

A History of Hair Removal
Author: Rebecca M. Herzig
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479840254
Category: Social Science
Page: 280
View: 748

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From the clamshell razors and homemade lye depilatories used in colonial America to the diode lasers and prescription pharmaceuticals available today, Americans have used a staggering array of tools to remove hair deemed unsightly, unnatural, or excessive. This is true especially for women and girls; conservative estimates indicate that 99% of American women have tried hair removal, and at least 85% regularly remove hair from their faces, armpits, legs, and bikini lines. How and when does hair become a problem—what makes some growth “excessive”? Who or what separates the necessary from the superfluous? In Plucked, historian Rebecca Herzig addresses these questions about hair removal. She shows how, over time, dominant American beliefs about visible hair changed: where once elective hair removal was considered a “mutilation” practiced primarily by “savage” men, by the turn of the twentieth century, hair-free faces and limbs were expected for women. Visible hair growth—particularly on young, white women—came to be perceived as a sign of political extremism, sexual deviance, or mental illness. By the turn of the twenty-first century, more and more Americans were waxing, threading, shaving, or lasering themselves smooth. Herzig’s extraordinary account also reveals some of the collateral damages of the intensifying pursuit of hair-free skin. Moving beyond the experiences of particular patients or clients, Herzig describes the surprising histories of race, science, industry, and medicine behind today's hair-removing tools. Plucked is an unsettling, gripping, and original tale of the lengths to which Americans will go to remove hair.

Major Problems in the History of American Workers

Documents and Essays
Author: Eileen Boris,Nelson Lichtenstein
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin College Division
ISBN: N.A
Category: Education
Page: 562
View: 9232

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This text, designed for courses in US labor history or the history of American workers, presents a carefully selected group of readings that allow students to evaluate primary sources, test the interpretations of distinguished historians, and draw their own conclusions. Major Problems in the History of American Workers follows the proven Major Problems format, with 14–15 chapters per volume, a combination of documents and essays, chapter introductions, headnotes, and suggested readings.

Mit den Dingen leben

zur Geschichte der Alltagsgegenstände
Author: Anke Ortlepp,Christoph Ribbat
Publisher: Franz Steiner Verlag Wiesbaden gmbh
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 339
View: 5938

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Ax, corset, and sewing machine - what do everyday objects reveal about a community? What significance do they have in history? In American cultural studies particularly, nothing is too small, no object too primitive to become the subject of historical research. In a methodologically and theoretically innovative way, the contributions to this volume show how national identity, but also gender and ethnicity, are significantly influenced by material culture. Everyday objects thus gain a key role in cultural history. Against this background, this volume makes key texts from the American cultural debate accessible to the German-speaking readership. Chronologically organized, it pursues the Thing History of the 19th and 20th Centuries.

Friends and enemies in Penn's Woods

Indians, colonists, and the racial construction of Pennsylvania
Author: William Pencak,Daniel K. Richter
Publisher: Pennsylvania State Univ Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 7105

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Two powerfully contradictory images dominate historical memory when we think of Native Americans and colonists in early Pennsylvania. To one side is William Penn's legendary treaty with the Lenape at Shackamaxon in 1682, enshrined in Edward Hicks's allegories of the "Peaceable Kingdom." To the other is the Paxton Boys' cold-blooded slaughter of twenty Conestoga men, women, and children in 1763. How relations between Pennsylvanians and their Native neighbors deteriorated, in only eighty years, from the idealism of Shackamaxon to the bloodthirstiness of Conestoga is the central theme of Friends and Enemies in Penn's Woods. William Pencak and Daniel Richter have assembled some of the most talented young historians working in the field today. Their approaches and subject matter vary greatly, but they all concentrate less on the details of how European and Indian Pennsylvanians negotiated and fought than on how people constructed and reconstructed their cultures in dialogue with others. Taken together, the essays trace the collapse of whatever potential may have existed for a Pennsylvania shared by Indians and Europeans. What remained was a racialized definition that left no room for Native people, except in reassuring memories of the justice of the Founder. Pennsylvania came to be a landscape utterly dominated by Euro-Americans, who managed to turn the region's history into not only a story solely about themselves but also a morality tale about their best (William Penn) and worst (Paxton Boys) sides. The construction of Pennsylvania on Native ground was also the construction of a racial order for the new nation. Friends and Enemies in Penn's Woods will find a broad audience among scholarsof early American history, Native American history, and race relations.