The Routledge Research Companion to Shakespeare and Classical Literature


Author: Sean Keilen,Nick Moschovakis
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317041682
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 334
View: 4502

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In this wide-ranging and ambitiously conceived Research Companion, contributors explore Shakespeare’s relationship to the classic in two broad senses. The essays analyze Shakespeare’s specific debts to classical works and weigh his classicism’s likeness and unlikeness to that of others in his time; they also evaluate the effects of that classical influence to assess the extent to which it is connected with whatever qualities still make Shakespeare, himself, a classic (arguably the classic) of modern world literature and drama. The first sense of the classic which the volume addresses is the classical culture of Latin and Greek reading, translation, and imitation. Education in the canon of pagan classics bound Shakespeare together with other writers in what was the dominant tradition of English and European poetry and drama, up through the nineteenth and even well into the twentieth century. Second—and no less central—is the idea of classics as such, that of books whose perceived value, exceeding that of most in their era, justifies their protection against historical and cultural change. The volume’s organizing insight is that as Shakespeare was made a classic in this second, antiquarian sense, his work’s reception has more and more come to resemble that of classics in the first sense—of ancient texts subject to labored critical study by masses of professional interpreters who are needed to mediate their meaning, simply because of the texts’ growing remoteness from ordinary life, language, and consciousness. The volume presents overviews and argumentative essays about the presence of Latin and Greek literature in Shakespeare’s writing. They coexist in the volume with thought pieces on the uses of the classical as a historical and pedagogical category, and with practical essays on the place of ancient classics in today’s Shakespearean classrooms.

Terence and Interpretation


Author: Sophia Papaioannou
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443869678
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 325
View: 7553

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PIERIDES IV, Series Editors: Sophia Papaioannou This volume examines interpretation as the original process of critical reception vis-a-vis Terence’s experimental comedies. The book, which consists of two parts, looks at Terence as both an agent and a subject of interpretation. The First Part (‘Terence as Interpreter’) examines Terence as an interpreter of earlier literary traditions, both Greek and Roman. The Second Part (‘Interpretations of Terence’) identifies and explores different expressions of the critical reception of Terence’s output. The papers in both sections illustrate the various expressions of originality and individual creative genius that the process of interpretation entails. The volume at hand is the first study to focus not only on the interpreter, but also on the continuity and evolution of the principles of interpretation. In this way, it directs the focus from Terence’s work to the meaning of Terence’s work in relation to his predecessors (the past literary tradition), his contemporaries (his literary antagonists, but also his audience), and posterity (his critical readers across the centuries).

Greek Epigram from the Hellenistic to the Early Byzantine Era


Author: Maria Kanellou,Ivana Petrovic,Chris Carey
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0192573780
Category: Poetry
Page: 416
View: 6344

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Greek epigram is a remarkable poetic form. The briefest of all ancient Greek genres, it is also the most resilient: for almost a thousand years it attracted some of the finest Greek poetic talents as well as exerting a profound interest on Latin literature, and it continues to inspire and influence modern translations and imitations. After a long period of neglect, research on epigram has surged during recent decades, and this volume draws on the fruits of that renewed scholarly engagement. It is concerned not with the work of individual authors or anthologies, but with the evolution of particular subgenres over time, and provides a selection of in-depth treatments of key aspects of Greek literary epigram of the Hellenistic, Roman, and early Byzantine periods. Individual chapters offer insights into a variety of topics, from explorations of the dynamic interactions between poets and their predecessors and contemporaries, and of the relationship between epigram and its socio-political, cultural, and literary background from the third century BCE up until the sixth century CE, to its interaction with its origins, inscribed epigram more generally, other literary genres, the visual arts, and Latin poetry, as well as the process of editing and compilation which generated the collections which survived into the modern world. Through the medium of individual studies the volume as a whole seeks to offer a sense of this vibrant and dynamic poetic form and its world which will be of value to scholars and students of Greek epigram and classical literature more broadly.

Dracontius, Romul. 10 (Medea)

Einleitung, Text, Übersetzung und Kommentar
Author: Blossius Aemilius Dracontius
Publisher: Universitaetsverlag Winter
ISBN: N.A
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 558
View: 9290

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Der detaillierte wissenschaftliche Kommentar zu Dracontius' Romul. 10 (Medea) (um 500 n. Chr.) eroffnet einen Einblick in die mythologische Dichtung des nordafrikanischen Dichters der De laudibus Dei. Neben der Erorterung von sprachlichen Aspekten (z.B. von Elementen der traditionellen Dichtersprache, spatlateinischen Wendungen, prosodischen Besonderheiten), der Diskussion von Motiven und textkritischen Uberlegungen stellt er Dracontius' Mythenversion, in der Medea in erster Linie als Menschen opfernde Dianapriesterin auftritt, in direkten Bezug zum gotterkritischen Epilog des Kurzepos und lotet dabei Dracontius' freien Umgang mit den fruheren Mythenfassungen aus. Dem Kommentar liegt eine neue kritische Ausgabe des Textes zugrunde, die zusammen mit der ersten vollstandigen deutschen Ubersetzung prasentiert wird.

Eunuchus


Author: Terence,John Barsby
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521458719
Category: Drama
Page: 336
View: 6529

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Terence's Eunuchus (The Eunuch) was his most successful play in his lifetime but has been surprisingly neglected by modern commentators. In this first ever full-scale commentary in English, Professor Barsby provides a thorough examination of the play in terms of its literary and dramatic qualities, its staging, and its relationship to the two plays of Menander's on which it is based. The commentary includes scene-by-scene discussions which bring out the development of character and plot, and the notes offer a close study of Terence's language in comparison with that of his predecessor Plautus. A full introduction puts Terence in his historical and literary context, and there are two appendices, one on metre and the other giving text and translation of the remains of Menander's Eunouchos and Kolax.

Terence: Eunuchus


Author: Terence
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521452298
Category: History
Page: 344
View: 3424

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This is the first ever full-scale commentary in English on Eunuchus (The Eunuch) by the Roman comic playwright Terence. This was his most successful play in his lifetime and one of his most popular plays in the Renaissance period, though it has been surprisingly neglected by modern commentators. The book provides a thorough examination of the literary and dramatic qualities of the play, and also offers a close study of Terence's Latin in comparison with that of his predecessor Plautus.

Die Hetäre in der griechischen und römischen Komödie


Author: Ulrike Auhagen
Publisher: C.H.Beck
ISBN: 282184638X
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 2640

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Die vorliegende Monographie ist einer zentralen Figur der griechischen und römischen Komödie gewidmet: der Hetäre. Dabei untersucht die Autorin sowohl die nur fragmentarisch erhalten Stücke der griechischen Komödie, als auch vor allem komplett erhaltene Stücke von Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus und Terenz. Ein solcher Gesamtüberblick ist neu. Die hetaira ist eine griechische Prostituierte meist der gehobenen Art; Sie ist eine ‚Gefährtin‘, während ihr römisches Pendant meretrix auf das ‚Verdienen‘ reduziert ist. Die begrifflichen spiegeln die soziokulturellen Unterschiede wider: In der attischen Gesellschaft des 5., 4. und 3. Jahrhunderts v. Chr. konnten Hetären eine – verglichen mit römischen oder heutigen Verhältnissen – herausragende Rolle spielen. Aspasia, die Geliebte und zweite Frau des Perikles, ist ein berühmtes Beispiel. In Rom jedoch ist die Prostitution zunächst auf Bordelle beschränkt. Meretrices spielen als offizielle Freundinnen einflußreicher Politiker noch keine Rolle; ein römisches Gegenstück zu Aspasia gibt es um 200 v. Chr. zu Plautus’, aber auch eine Generation später zu Terenz’ Zeit noch nicht. Die unterschiedlichen gesellschaftlichen Voraussetzungen bedingen die jeweilige literarische Umsetzung: Während die griechische Komödie reale gesellschaftliche Verhältnisse abbildet, spielen die Komödien von Plautus und Terenz in einer irrealen Welt: Sie sind vor dem geistigen Hintergrund der Saturnalien erklärbar, jener antiken Form des Karnevals, bei der Sklaven und Herren für einen Tag die Rollen tauschten. Schwerpunkte der Untersuchung sind Menander, Plautus und Terenz. In den Menander-Komödien dominiert die Figur der ‚guten‘ Hetäre, die in die Handlung eingreift und anderen selbstlos zu ihrem Recht verhilft. Bei Plautus hingegen steht die Figur der mala meretrix im Vordergrund, die in saturnalischer Weise über ihre sie gesellschaftlich weit übertreffenden Liebhaber triumphiert. Terenz wiederum bringt bonae meretrices auf die Bühne, die durchaus mit menandrischen Hetären vergleichbar sind. Diese ‚griechischere‘ Haltung dürfte Ausdruck einer sich allmählich wandelnden Wahrnehmung griechischer Kultur in Rom sein infolge der Eroberungen des griechischen Ostens.

Die Frau aus Andros


Author: Thornton Wilder
Publisher: S. Fischer Verlag
ISBN: 3104034532
Category: Fiction
Page: 120
View: 7491

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Thornton Wilders Roman ›Die Frau aus Andros‹ erzählt von einer beeindruckenden Frau in der Spätzeit der griechischen Antike Eingebunden in Hinweise auf das »Land, das bald das Heilige genannt werden sollte«, spielt dieser Roman Thornton Wilders in der Spätzeit der griechischen Antike. Chrysis, die Nichtgriechin von der Kykladeninsel Andros, hat zur Zeit um Christi Geburt auf der ägäischen Insel Brynos zum Ärger der auf Handel eingeschworenen Bewohner den alten Brauch des Hetärenmahls mit Rezitation, Musik und Diskussion über philosophische Probleme wiederaufgenommen. Von den wohlhabenden Bürgern verachtet, versammeln sie und ihre Schwester Glykerion die sozial Schwachen, aber auch, sehr zum Leid ihrer Eltern, die jungen Männer. »Mit diesem Werk erreichte Wilder einen vorläufigen Höhepunkt seiner künstlerischen Entwicklung.« Hermann Stresau

American Journal of Philology


Author: Charles William Emil Miller,Benjamin Dean Meritt,Tenney Frank,Henry Thompson Rowell,Harold Fredrik Cherniss
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Classical philology
Page: 186
View: 5402

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Each number includes "Reviews and book notices."

The Edinburgh Companion to Ancient Greece and Rome


Author: Edward Bispham,Thomas J. Harrison,Brian A. Sparkes
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780748616299
Category: History
Page: 604
View: 1926

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The Edinburgh Companion is a gateway to the fascinating worlds of ancient Greece and Rome. Wide-ranging in its approach, expert contributors demonstrate the multifaceted nature of classic civilization by drawing together perspectives and methods of different disciplines, from philosophy to history, poetry to archaeology, art history to numismatics, and many more.

Eunuchus


Author: Terence
Publisher: Loeb Classical Library
ISBN: N.A
Category: Drama
Page: 464
View: 9151

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The six plays by Terence (died 159 BCE), all extant, imaginatively reformulate Greek New Comedy in realistic scenes and refined Latin. They include "Phormio," a comedy of intrigue and trickery; "The Brothers," which explores parental education of sons; and "The Eunuch," which presents the most sympathetically drawn courtesan in Roman comedy.

Adelphae


Author: Terence,R. H. Martin
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521290012
Category: Drama
Page: 259
View: 6306

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An edition of the Latin comedy, "The Brothers", with introduction and detailed commentary.

Terence and the Language of Roman Comedy


Author: Evangelos Karakasis
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139444453
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 5031

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This book offers a comprehensive examination of the language of Roman comedy in general and that of Terence in particular. The study explores Terence's use of language to differentiate his characters and his language in relation to the language of the comic fragments of the palliata, the togata and the atellana. Linguistic categories in the Terentian corpus explored include colloquialisms, archaisms, hellenisms and idiolectal features. Terence is shown to give his old men an old-fashioned and verbose tone, while low characters are represented as using colloquial diction. An examination of Eunuchus' language shows it to be closer to the Plautine linguistic tradition. The book also provides a thorough linguistic/stylistic commentary on all the fragments of the palliata, the togata and the atellana. It shows that Terence, except in the case of his Eunuchus, consciously distances himself from the linguistic/stylistic tradition of Plautus followed by all other comic poets.