Roman Tragedy


Author: Anthony J. Boyle
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113469685X
Category: Drama
Page: 320
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The first detailed cultural and theatrical history of a major literary form, this landmark introduction examines Roman tragedy and its place at the centre of Rome’s cultural and political life. Analyzing the work of such names as Ennius, Pacuvius and Accius, as well as Seneca and his post-Neronian successors, Anthony J. Boyle delves into detailed discussion on every Roman tragedian whose work survives in substance today. Roman Tragedy examines: the history of Roman tragic techniques and conventions the history of generic form and change the debt that Rome owes to Greece, and text owes to text the birth, development and death of Roman tragedy in the context of the cities evolving, institutions, ideologies and political and social practices tragedy proper and the historical drama (fabula praetexta), which the Romans allied to tragedy. With parallel English translations of Latin quotations, this seminal work not only provides an invaluable resource for students of theatre, Roman political history and cultural history, but it is also accessible to all interested in the social dynamics of writing, spectacle, ideology and power.

The Routledge Research Companion to Shakespeare and Classical Literature


Author: Sean Keilen,Nick Moschovakis
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317041682
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 334
View: 9411

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In this wide-ranging and ambitiously conceived Research Companion, contributors explore Shakespeare’s relationship to the classic in two broad senses. The essays analyze Shakespeare’s specific debts to classical works and weigh his classicism’s likeness and unlikeness to that of others in his time; they also evaluate the effects of that classical influence to assess the extent to which it is connected with whatever qualities still make Shakespeare, himself, a classic (arguably the classic) of modern world literature and drama. The first sense of the classic which the volume addresses is the classical culture of Latin and Greek reading, translation, and imitation. Education in the canon of pagan classics bound Shakespeare together with other writers in what was the dominant tradition of English and European poetry and drama, up through the nineteenth and even well into the twentieth century. Second—and no less central—is the idea of classics as such, that of books whose perceived value, exceeding that of most in their era, justifies their protection against historical and cultural change. The volume’s organizing insight is that as Shakespeare was made a classic in this second, antiquarian sense, his work’s reception has more and more come to resemble that of classics in the first sense—of ancient texts subject to labored critical study by masses of professional interpreters who are needed to mediate their meaning, simply because of the texts’ growing remoteness from ordinary life, language, and consciousness. The volume presents overviews and argumentative essays about the presence of Latin and Greek literature in Shakespeare’s writing. They coexist in the volume with thought pieces on the uses of the classical as a historical and pedagogical category, and with practical essays on the place of ancient classics in today’s Shakespearean classrooms.

Eunuchus

The Eunuch
Author: Terence
Publisher: Hackett Publishing
ISBN: 1585107727
Category: Drama
Page: 80
View: 7224

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The play Eunuchus provides an introduction to the world of Roman comedy from one of its best practitioners, Terence. As with all Focus translations, the emphasis is on an inexpensive, readable edition that is close to the original, with an extensive introduction, notes and appendices.

Terence and Interpretation


Author: Sophia Papaioannou
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443869678
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 325
View: 6656

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PIERIDES IV, Series Editors: Sophia Papaioannou This volume examines interpretation as the original process of critical reception vis-a-vis Terence’s experimental comedies. The book, which consists of two parts, looks at Terence as both an agent and a subject of interpretation. The First Part (‘Terence as Interpreter’) examines Terence as an interpreter of earlier literary traditions, both Greek and Roman. The Second Part (‘Interpretations of Terence’) identifies and explores different expressions of the critical reception of Terence’s output. The papers in both sections illustrate the various expressions of originality and individual creative genius that the process of interpretation entails. The volume at hand is the first study to focus not only on the interpreter, but also on the continuity and evolution of the principles of interpretation. In this way, it directs the focus from Terence’s work to the meaning of Terence’s work in relation to his predecessors (the past literary tradition), his contemporaries (his literary antagonists, but also his audience), and posterity (his critical readers across the centuries).

Terence and the Language of Roman Comedy


Author: Evangelos Karakasis
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139444453
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 7357

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This book offers a comprehensive examination of the language of Roman comedy in general and that of Terence in particular. The study explores Terence's use of language to differentiate his characters and his language in relation to the language of the comic fragments of the palliata, the togata and the atellana. Linguistic categories in the Terentian corpus explored include colloquialisms, archaisms, hellenisms and idiolectal features. Terence is shown to give his old men an old-fashioned and verbose tone, while low characters are represented as using colloquial diction. An examination of Eunuchus' language shows it to be closer to the Plautine linguistic tradition. The book also provides a thorough linguistic/stylistic commentary on all the fragments of the palliata, the togata and the atellana. It shows that Terence, except in the case of his Eunuchus, consciously distances himself from the linguistic/stylistic tradition of Plautus followed by all other comic poets.

Archaic Latin prose


Author: Edward Courtney
Publisher: An American Philological Association Book
ISBN: N.A
Category: Foreign Language Study
Page: 164
View: 8952

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This work aims to show how certain striking features of classical Latin prose style have their roots in forms of expression established in archaic Latin and even beyond that in Indo-European. Some of these forms are to be explained by the origins of complex syntactical constructions, some bycultural conditions, while others are peculiar to the Latin language. These factors are exemplified in texts ranging from about 450 BC (the Twelve Tables) to about 100 BC, which are accompanied by a full commentary not confined to stylistic issues. These texts will be of interest not only tostudents of literature and linguistics but also of history, law, and religion.

Horace: Odes Book II


Author: Horace
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107012910
Category: History
Page: 274
View: 5858

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The first substantial commentary for a generation on this book of Horace's Odes, a great masterpiece of classical Latin literature.

Music in Roman Comedy


Author: Timothy J. Moore
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107006481
Category: History
Page: 452
View: 2813

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Offers a new explanation of how the plays of Plautus and Terence worked as musical theatre.

Plautus: Menaechmi


Author: Titus Maccius Plautus,A. S. Gratwick
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521349703
Category: History
Page: 276
View: 8147

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Plautus' comedy Menaechmi was the main inspiration for Shakespeare's The Comedy of Errors. In this edition Dr. Gratwick provides a newly constituted text, a commentary for students giving help with language and context, and an introduction that sheds new light on the interpretation of the play and on Plautus' place in the development of European comedy. Central to Dr. Gratwick's treatment is an analysis of the various meters employed by Plautus, which challenges many conventional views but also offers the student practical assistance with the technical problems involved.

Plagiarism in Latin Literature


Author: Scott McGill
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139536656
Category: History
Page: N.A
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In response to critics who charged him with plagiarism, Virgil is said to have responded that it was easier to steal Hercules' club than a line from Homer. This was to deny the allegations by implying that Virgil was no plagiarist at all, but an author who had done the hard work of making Homer's material his own. Several other texts and passages in Latin literature provide further evidence for accusations and denials of plagiarism. Plagiarism in Latin Literature explores important questions such as, how do Roman writers and speakers define the practice? And how do the accusations and denials function? Scott McGill moves between varied sources, including Terence, Martial, Seneca the Elder and Macrobius' Virgil criticism to explore these questions. In the process, he offers new insights into the history of plagiarism and related issues, including Roman notions of literary property, authorship and textual reuse.

Terence: Phormio. The mother-in-law. The brothers


Author: Terence
Publisher: Loeb Classical Library
ISBN: 9780674995987
Category: Drama
Page: 375
View: 2972

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The six plays by Terence (died 159 BCE), all extant, imaginatively reformulate Greek New Comedy in realistic scenes and refined Latin. They include "Phormio," a comedy of intrigue and trickery; "The Brothers," which explores parental education of sons; and "The Eunuch," which presents the most sympathetically drawn courtesan in Roman comedy.

Mimetic Contagion

Art and Artifice in Terence's Eunuch
Author: Robert Germany
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198738730
Category:
Page: 240
View: 5745

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When we are confronted with a work of art, what is its effect on us? In contrast to post-Enlightenment conceptions, which tend to restrict themselves to aesthetic or discursive responses, the ancient Greeks and Romans often conceived works of art as having a more dynamic effect on their viewers, inspiring them to direct imitation of what they saw represented. This notion of 'mimetic contagion' was a persistent and widespread mode of framing response to art across the ancient world, discernible in both popular and elevated cultural forms, yet deployed differently in various historical contexts; it is only under the specificity of a particular cultural moment's concerns that it becomes most useful as a lens for understanding how that culture is attempting to negotiate the problems of representation. After framing the phenomenon in terms general enough to be applicable across many periods, literary genres, and artistic media, this volume takes a particular literary work, Terence's Eunuch, as a starting point, both as a vivid example of this extensive pattern, and as a case study situating use of the motif within the peculiarities of a particular historical moment, in this case mid-second-century BC Rome and its anxieties about the power of art. One of the features of mimetic contagion frequently noted in this study is its capacity to render the operation of a particular work of art an emblem for the effect of representation more generally, and this is certainly the case in the Eunuch, whereby the painting at the centre of the play functions as a metatheatrical figure for the dynamics of mimesis throughout, illustrating how the concept may function as the key to a particular literary work. Although mimetic contagion is only one available Greco-Roman strategy for understanding the power of art, by offering an extended reading of a single work of literature through this lens, this volume demonstrates what ramifications closer attention to it might have for modern readers and literary criticism.

A Companion to Terence


Author: Antony Augoustakis,Ariana Traill
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118301994
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 560
View: 5450

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A comprehensive collection of essays by leading scholars in the field that address, in a single volume, several key issues in interpreting Terence offering a detailed study of Terence’s plays and situating them in their socio-historical context, as well as documenting their reception through to present day • The first comprehensive collection of essays on Terence in English, by leading scholars in the field • Covers a range of topics, including both traditional and modern concerns of gender, race, and reception • Features a wide-ranging but interconnected series of essays that offer new perspectives in interpreting Terence • Includes an introduction discussing the life of Terence, its impact on subsequent studies of the poet, and the question of his ethnicity

Herodotus: Histories


Author: Herodotus
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107511844
Category: History
Page: N.A
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One of the most important works of history in Western literature, by the freshest and liveliest of all classical Greek prose authors, Herodotus's Histories is also a key text for the study of ancient Greece and the Persian Empire. Covering a central and widely studied period of Greek history, Book V not only describes the revolt of the east Greeks against their Persian masters, which led to the great Persian Wars of 490–479 BC, but also provides fascinating material about the mainland Greek states in the sixth century BC. This is an up-to-date edition of and commentary on the Greek text of the book, providing extensive help with the Greek, basic historical information and clear maps, as well as lucid and insightful historical and literary interpretation of the text. The volume is suitable for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, teachers and scholars.

Terence: Hecyra


Author: Terence
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521896924
Category: Drama
Page: 230
View: 4074

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Commentary providing firm grounding in matters of language and text while addressing major literary, dramatic and historical questions.

Reading Roman Comedy

Poetics and Playfulness in Plautus and Terence
Author: Alison Sharrock
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139482645
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 3854

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For many years the domain of specialists in early Latin, in complex metres, and in the reconstruction of texts, Roman comedy is now established in the mainstream of Classical literary criticism. Where most books stress the original performance as the primary location for the encountering of the plays, this book finds the locus of meaning and appreciation in the activity of a reader, albeit one whose manner of reading necessarily involves the imaginative reconstruction of performance. The texts are treated, and celebrated, as literary devices, with programmatic beginnings, middles, ends, and intertexts. All the extant plays of Plautus and Terence have at least a bit part in this book, which seeks to expose the authors' fabulous artificiality and artifice, while playing along with their differing but interrelated poses of generic humility.

Adelphae


Author: Terence,R. H. Martin
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521290012
Category: Drama
Page: 259
View: 830

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An edition of the Latin comedy, "The Brothers", with introduction and detailed commentary.