A Song for Summer


Author: Eva Ibbotson
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
ISBN: 033047734X
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 432
View: 2186

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When Ellen Carr abandons grey, dreary London to become housekeeper at an experimental school in Austria, she finds her destiny. Swept into an idyllic world of mountains, music, eccentric teachers and wayward children, Ellen brings order and joy to all around her. But it's the handsome, mysterious gardener, Marek, who intrigues her - Marek, who has a dangerous secret. As Hitler's troops spread across Europe, Ellen has promises to keep, even if they mean she must sacrifice her future happiness . . . A Song for Summer is an unforgettable love story from Eva Ibbotson, the award-winning author of Journey to the River Sea and The Star of Kazan.

Peyton Place


Author: Grace Metalious
Publisher: UPNE
ISBN: 1555537596
Category: Social Science
Page: 384
View: 3458

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A new paperback edition of the infamous novel that shocked the nation

The Cosy Canal Boat Dream


Author: Christie Barlow
Publisher: HarperImpulse
ISBN: 9780008240905
Category:
Page: 416
View: 2152

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You will adore this heartwarming, laugh-out-loud romantic comedy from bestelling author Christie Barlow! 'Full of warmth, fun and feel-good factor' Sunday Times bestseller Katie Fforde Welcome to the Little Rock marina - where hearts are healed and dreams are made... For the last two years Nell Andrews has been struggling to stay afloat. As her life tumbled down around her, the only safety net has been her cosy canal boat, The Nollie. Tucked away inside, Nell has found a place to heal her broken heart. And now she's ready to move on and follow her dream... Gorgeous Guy Cornish, with his easy Irish charm, makes him an instant hit with everyone at the marina, and the perfect person to help Nell with her project. But Guy has his own reasons for being at the marina, and a past that threatens to sink Nell's dream... What readers are saying about The Cosy Canal Boat Dream: 'The queen of heartwarming fiction' Bella Osborne'What a gorgeous romance - fun, poignant and surprising' Sunday Times bestseller Michele Gorman'My favourite Christie Barlow book of all time...perfect for when you want to be lost in a cuddle of a book' Rachel's Random Reads'Christie Barlow's best book yet...Phenomenal' The Writing Garnet'Delightfully warm with plenty of twists and turns' Mama Life Magazine'An absolute joy to read and full of surprises...one of the best writers in this genre' The Book Review Cafe

The People at Number 9


Author: Felicity Everett
Publisher: HQ
ISBN: 9780008228804
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 4334

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'Have you met them yet, the new couple?' When Gav and Lou move into the house next door, Sara spends days plucking up courage to say hello. The neighbours are glamorous, chaotic and just a little eccentric. They make the rest of Sara's street seem dull by comparison. When the hand of friendship is extended, Sara is delighted and flattered. Incredibly, Gav and Lou seem to see something in Sara and Neil that they admire too. In no time at all, the two couples are soulmates, sharing suppers, bottles of red wine and childcare, laughing and trading stories and secrets late into the night in one another's houses. And the more time Sara spends with Gav and Lou, the more she longs to make changes in her own life. But those changes will come at a price. Soon Gav and Lou will be asking things they've no right to ask of their neighbours, with shattering consequences for all of them... Have you met The People at Number 9? A dark and delicious novel about envy, longing and betrayal in the suburbs...

My Life


Author: Bill Clinton
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9781400043934
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 1008
View: 6497

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President Bill Clinton’s My Life is the strikingly candid portrait of a global leader who decided early in life to devote his intellectual and political gifts, and his extraordinary capacity for hard work, to serving the public. It shows us the progress of a remarkable American, who, through his own enormous energies and efforts, made the unlikely journey from Hope, Arkansas, to the White House—a journey fueled by an impassioned interest in the political process which manifested itself at every stage of his life: in college, working as an intern for Senator William Fulbright; at Oxford, becoming part of the Vietnam War protest movement; at Yale Law School, campaigning on the grassroots level for Democratic candidates; back in Arkansas, running for Congress, attorney general, and governor. We see his career shaped by his resolute determination to improve the life of his fellow citizens, an unfaltering commitment to civil rights, and an exceptional understanding of the practicalities of political life. We come to understand the emotional pressures of his youth—born after his father’s death; caught in the dysfunctional relationship between his feisty, nurturing mother and his abusive stepfather, whom he never ceased to love and whose name he took; drawn to the brilliant, compelling Hillary Rodham, whom he was determined to marry; passionately devoted, from her infancy, to their daughter, Chelsea, and to the entire experience of fatherhood; slowly and painfully beginning to comprehend how his early denial of pain led him at times into damaging patterns of behavior. President Clinton’s book is also the fullest, most concretely detailed, most nuanced account of a presidency ever written—encompassing not only the high points and crises but the way the presidency actually works: the day-to-day bombardment of problems, personalities, conflicts, setbacks, achievements. It is a testament to the positive impact on America and on the world of his work and his ideals. It is the gripping account of a president under concerted and unrelenting assault orchestrated by his enemies on the Far Right, and how he survived and prevailed. It is a treasury of moments caught alive, among them: • The ten-year-old boy watching the national political conventions on his family’s new (and first) television set. • The young candidate looking for votes in the Arkansas hills and the local seer who tells him, “Anybody who would campaign at a beer joint in Joiner at midnight on Saturday night deserves to carry one box. . . . You’ll win here. But it’ll be the only damn place you win in this county.” (He was right on both counts.) • The roller-coaster ride of the 1992 campaign. • The extraordinarily frank exchanges with Newt Gingrich and Bob Dole. • The delicate manipulation needed to convince Rabin and Arafat to shake hands for the camera while keeping Arafat from kissing Rabin. • The cost, both public and private, of the scandal that threatened the presidency. Here is the life of a great national and international figure, revealed with all his talents and contradictions, told openly, directly, in his own completely recognizable voice. A unique book by a unique American. From the Hardcover edition.

Nothing to be Frightened Of


Author: Julian Barnes
Publisher: Vintage Canada
ISBN: 0307368440
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 256
View: 5631

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"I don’t believe in God, but I miss him." So begins Julian Barnes’s brilliant new book that is, among many things, a family memoir, an exchange with his brother (a philosopher), a meditation on mortality and the fear of death, a celebration of art, an argument with and about God, and a homage to the writer Jules Renard. Barnes also draws poignant portraits of the last days of his parents, recalled with great detail, affection and exasperation. Other examples he takes up include writers, "most of them dead and quite a few of them French," as well as some composers, for good measure. The grace with which Barnes weaves together all of these threads makes the experience of reading the book nothing less than exhilarating. Although he cautions us that "this is not my autobiography," the book nonetheless reveals much about Barnes the man and the novelist: how he thinks and how he writes and how he lives. At once deadly serious and dazzlingly playful, Nothing to Be Frightened Of is a wise, funny and constantly surprising tour of the human condition. From the Hardcover edition.

Archangel's Storm


Author: Nalini Singh
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101581433
Category: Fiction
Page: 352
View: 3407

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Enter New York Times bestselling author Nalini Singh’s darkly beautiful world of archangels and immortal power, as a pact is sealed between two souls bound by blood, stirred by desire, and driven by vengeance… With wings of midnight and an affinity for shadows, Jason courts darkness. But now, with the Archangel Neha’s consort lying murdered in the jewel-studded palace that was his prison and her rage threatening cataclysmic devastation, Jason steps into the light, knowing he must unearth the murderer before it is too late. Earning Neha’s trust comes at a price—Jason must tie himself to her bloodline through the Princess Mahiya, a woman with secrets so dangerous, she trusts no one. Least of all an enemy spymaster. With only their relentless hunt for a violent, intelligent killer to unite them, Jason and Mahiya embark on a quest that leads to a centuries-old nightmare… and to the dark storm of an unexpected passion that threatens to drench them both in blood.

Aleta Dey


Author: Francis Marion Beynon
Publisher: Broadview Press
ISBN: 1770483322
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 194
View: 1180

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Francis Marion Beynon’s autobiographical novel Aleta Dey is increasingly recognised as a small classic of early twentieth-century fiction. Beynon was a journalist and feminist much involved in public affairs in early twentieth-century Manitoba. In 1917, aged 33, she was forced to leave her job as a result of her open pacifism, and she soon moved to New York where she dropped out of the public eye. Aleta Dey, first published in 1919, tells in plain and affecting prose the story of a girl growing up in Manitoba, becoming politically conscious, and falling in love with McNair, a man of much more conventional views. The First World War brings a crisis for them both after McNair enlists as a soldier. Though Beynon was a Canadian, her spare, emotionally open prose may have less in common with that of other Canadian writers of the time than it does with the style of contemporaneous western American women writers such as Willa Cather and Laura Ingalls Wilder. Like Cather’s My Antonia, Beynon’s Aleta Dey resonates with prairie simplicity, passion, and strength.

Dear Enemy


Author: Jean Webster
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Orphans
Page: 350
View: 8577

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Sallie McBride, the new director of the John Grier Home for Orphans, keeps her friends posted on the latest occurrences in that institution.

Field and Hedgerow

Being the Last Essays of Richard Jefferies
Author: Richard Jefferies
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: England
Page: 331
View: 4072

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Silent Spring


Author: Rachel Carson
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780618249060
Category: Nature
Page: 378
View: 4307

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Discusses the reckless annihilation of fish and birds by the use of pesticides and warns of the possible genetic effects on humans.

Indian Summer of a Forsyte


Author: John Galsworthy
Publisher: John Galsworthy
ISBN: 8893151111
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: N.A
View: 3411

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In a short interlude after The Man of Property, Galsworthy delves into the newfound friendship between Irene and Old Jolyon Forsyte (June's grandfather, and by now the owner of the house Soames had built). This attachment gives Old Jolyon pleasure, but exhausts his strength. He leaves Irene money in his will with Young Jolyon, his son, as trustee. In the end Old Jolyon dies under an ancient oak tree in the garden of the Robin Hill house.