Sport and the English Middle Classes, 1870-1914


Author: John Lowerson
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 9780719046513
Category: Social Science
Page: 310
View: 7075

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This book examines the phenomena which explain the boom in sport among the middle classes in late Victorian England. The author focuses on the extent to which sport became an agent of the development of the middle classes and an instrument of their self-definition. The book does not set out to explain the making of the English middle classes; rather, it examines a significant part of that making.

Sport in Urban England

Middlesbrough, 1870–1914
Author: Catherine Budd
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1498529445
Category: History
Page: 312
View: 9149

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This book examines the largely unexplored social and cultural history of Middlesbrough and the leisure habits and opportunities of its people. It adds to existing studies of urban Britain and provides a specific study on the relationship between leisure and urbanization and industrialization. The book furthers understanding of urban sport and urban history by demonstrating how sport can be shaped by urban growth, whether directly or indirectly, and equally, how sport can also affect the way in which a town develops. This book shows how the study of sport in a particular setting provides another means of examining relationships between different social groups and within a large urban landscape. This book views the town’s sporting history alongside the development of Middlesbrough itself and within the context of the growth of sport in Britain more widely. Furthermore, as a study in urban history, this book addresses existing gaps in our knowledge of the development of towns and cities by examining the town’s sport. Through a detailed examination of local newspapers and archival sources, this book reveals the depth and diversity of the town’s sporting culture. In particular, it illustrates the role of the middle classes in the development of clubs, and the importance of class and social relations in determining an individual’s access to sport. As a consequence, the study also relates how the town’s working class populace was often excluded from the sporting culture, and shows the lack of sporting opportunities available to women. Amateurism is explored through the initial rejection of professional football, but the book also demonstrates the increased popularity of the professional game during this period. In addition, in view of Middlesbrough’s migrant population, the extent of football’s role in forming and reinforcing local and regional identities will be examined.

Handbook of Sports Studies


Author: Jay Coakley,Eric Dunning
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1446265056
Category: Social Science
Page: 570
View: 6244

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Now available in paperback, this vital handbook marks the development of sports studies as a major new discipline within the social sciences. Edited by the leading sociologist of sport, Eric Dunning, and Jay Coakley, author of the best selling textbook on sport in the USA, it both reflects and richly endorses this new found status. Key aspects of the Handbook include: an inventory of the principal achievements in the field; a guide to the chief conflicts and difficulties in the theory and research process; a rallying point for researchers who are established or new to the field, which sets the agenda for future developments; a resource book for teachers who wish to establish new curricula and develop courses and programmes in the area of sports studies. With an international and inter-disciplinary team of contributors the Handbook of Sports Studies is comprehensive in scope, relevant in content and far-reaching in its discussion of future prospect.

A Companion to Early Twentieth-Century Britain


Author: Chris Wrigley
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470998814
Category: History
Page: 608
View: 7328

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This Companion brings together 32 new essays by leading historians to provide a reassessment of British history in the early twentieth century. The contributors present lucid introductions to the literature and debates on major aspects of the political, social and economic history of Britain between 1900 and 1939. Examines controversial issues over the social impact of the First World War, especially on women Provides substantial coverage of changes in Wales, Scotland and Ireland as well as in England Includes a substantial bibliography, which will be a valuable guide to secondary sources

Serious Sport

J.A. Mangan's Contribution to the History of Sport
Author: Scott Crawford
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135756082
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 256
View: 2066

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Trial-blazer and mentor, Professor J.A. Mangan is a distinguished scholar in the fields of sports history whose work has inspired a generation of historians and social scientists across the globe. His seminal book on athleticism and imperialism commanded attention and applause from a broad range of historians and social scientists across the globe. His seminal work on athleticism and imperialism commanded attention and applause from a broad range of historians. It opened new horizons of inquiry providing the field with a richly perceptive study of hegemony and patronage, of cultural assimilation and adaptation, and of the ways that power elites used sport for socialization, acculturation and social control. His later works continued to pose critical, sometimes controversial questions, providing new and provocative insights into the complex social issues involved in the development and diffusion of sporting activity. The geographical horizons of his work now span the globe. This volume is a fitting tribute to the scholarship and lasting accomplishments of a pioneer who has mentored - and continues to mentor - numerous young scholars internationally, simultaneously developing and maintaining high quality channels through which to disseminate sport history research. In appraising his scholarship the contributors to this collection demonstrate their debt to his vision and achievements. This volume was previously published as a special issue of The International Journal of the History of Sport

A Social History of Tennis in Britain


Author: Robert J. Lake
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131760573X
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 318
View: 583

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Winner of the Lord Aberdare Literary Prize 2015- from the British Society for Sports History. From its advent in the mid-late nineteenth century as a garden-party pastime to its development into a highly commercialised and professionalised high-performance sport, the history of tennis in Britain reflects important themes in Britain’s social history. In the first comprehensive and critical account of the history of tennis in Britain, Robert Lake explains how the game’s historical roots have shaped its contemporary structure, and how the history of tennis can tell us much about the history of wider British society. Since its emergence as a spare-time diversion for landed elites, the dominant culture in British tennis has been one of amateurism and exclusion, with tennis sitting alongside cricket and golf as a vehicle for the reproduction of middle-class values throughout wider British society in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Consequently, the Lawn Tennis Association has been accused of a failure to promote inclusion or widen participation, despite steadfast efforts to develop talent and improve coaching practices and structures. Robert Lake examines these themes in the context of the global development of tennis and important processes of commercialisation and professional and social development that have shaped both tennis and wider society. The social history of tennis in Britain is a microcosm of late-nineteenth and twentieth-century British social history: sustained class power and class conflict; struggles for female emancipation and racial integration; the decline of empire; and, Britain’s shifting relationship with America, continental Europe, and Commonwealth nations. This book is important and fascinating reading for anybody with an interest in the history of sport or British social history.

Sport, Militarism and the Great War

Martial Manliness and Armageddon
Author: Thierry Terret,J. A. Mangan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135760950
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 329
View: 6503

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The Great War has been largely ignored by historians of sport. However sport was an integral part of cultural conditioning into both physiological and psychological military efficiency in the decades leading up to it. It is time to acknowledge that the Great War also had an influence on sport in post-war European culture. Both are neglected topics. Sport, Militarism and the Great War deals with four significant aspects of the relationship between sport and war before, during and immediately after the 1914-1918 conflict. First, it explores the creation and consolidation of the cult of martial heroism and chivalric self-sacrifice in the pre-war era. Second, it examines the consequences of the mingling of soldiers from various nations on later sport. Third, it considers the role of the Great War in the transformation of the leisure of the masses. Finally, it examines the links between war, sport and male socialisation. The Great War contributed to a redefinition of European masculinity in the post-war period. The part sport played in this redefinition receives attention. Sport, Militarism and the Great War is in two parts: the Continental (Part I) and the "Anglo-Saxon" (Part II). No study has adopted this bilateral approach to date. Thus, in conception and execution, it is original. With its originality of content and the approaching centenary of the advent of the Great War in 2014, it is anticipated that the book will capture a wide audience. This book was originally published as a special issue of The International Journal of the History of Sport.

Soccer and Society

South Wales, 1900-1939
Author: Martin Johnes
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 238
View: 8482

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In 1927, Welsh football reached a peak when Cardiff City beat Arsenal in the FA Cup Final. The game's popularity had grown at a notable rate in early 20th-century south Wales and, by 1939, football was an integral part of the region's popular culture.

Sport, Space and Segregation

Politics and Society in Pietermaritzburg
Author: Christopher Merrett
Publisher: University of Natal Press
ISBN: 9781869141615
Category: History
Page: 391
View: 6636

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This is a story of insiders and outsiders. Author Christopher Merrett uses physical recreation as a lens through which to view the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the South African city of Pietermaritzburg. He traces successive ideologies of imperialism, colonial segregation, and apartheid to show how sport was used to keep communities apart. Sport in Pietermaritzburg was 'white sport.' After the imposition of legislation, access to recreation facilities became a powerful cause for the city's anti-apartheid coalition. Sport provided an opportunity, one of the few in a police state, for meaningful protest. Sport, Space and Segregation provides an insight into the psychology of racism.

Rugby and the South African nation

sport, cultures, politics, and power in the old and new South Africas
Author: David R. Black,David Ross Black,John Nauright
Publisher: Manchester Univ Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 163
View: 2498

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Rugby and the South African Nation explores the complex and controversial role of rugby union in the politics and cultures of South Africa, from its emergence as a settler dominion in the early twentieth century through to the post-apartheid era. Conventional historical and political analyses of South Africa have frequently neglected the vital role of sport in general, and rugby in particular, in this fascinating society. This book seeks to fill this gap through a critical interpretation of rugby's role in the development of white society, its virtually ignored role in African communities, its role in shaping significant social divisions and its centrality to the apartheid era "power elite". It also considers the powerful influence of international rugby in forging a racist "national identity" Finally, it examines the varying meanings attached to rugby in the new South Africa from broad euphoria to a more narrow nostalgic appeal for many white rugby supporters with particular emphasis on the 1995 Rugby World Cup hosted and won by South Africa.

Sport, Identity and Ethnicity


Author: Jeremy MacClancy
Publisher: Berg Pub Limited
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 203
View: 2226

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Sport is now a major industry -- and one of increasing importance throughout both the developed and developing world -- but, until now, it has received little serious attention from anthropologists. In this first general book on the anthropology of sport, the contributors look at how different sports are used by a wide variety of peoples to express, manipulate and negotiate their identities, and to challenge the way they are defined by others. Chapters address: -the role played by football teams in colonial Zimbabwe to express locals' autonomy from their British rulers; -the evolution of one of Venice's central festive occasions -- its regatta -- from a ritual of state to a sport of the people; modern and postmodern transformations of polo in Pakistan, its original home -the resolution of problematic aspects of social life in Turkey through wrestling; -the manner by which Catalan nationalists successfully exploited the Barcelona Olympics for their own political ends; and -the controversy between anglers and anti-anglers in Britain. This pioneering volume will be of interest to anthropologists, sociologists, sport historians and all those interested in this popular subject.

The Beginnings of a Commercial Sporting Culture in Britain, 1793–1850


Author: Mr Adrian Harvey
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409479528
Category: History
Page: 270
View: 2573

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Many historians have described early industrial Britain as a 'bleak age' where the masses possessed little time, energy or money to devote to sport. Adrian Harvey reveals a very different picture of Britain at this time to show a rich, diverse and commercial sporting culture accessible to almost everyone. Far from being tied to a recreational calendar that was dependent upon established, traditional holidays, sporting events occurred within their own leisure timetable. Indeed, by the 1840s, it was common for sporting events to be conducted on a regular basis every week. Harvey demonstrates how newspapers and periodicals began to recognize that sport had the capacity to capture the public's imagination, and the importance of the spectating audience transformed the staging of events into a major source of revenue. The increasing amount of money involved in sport created a situation in which the participants were often unable to regulate and administer activity, especially as they were confronted with instances of substantial corruption and fraud. The public perception of activity in many sports changed dramatically, with the existence of professionals expanding and the social elite withdrawing from the various roles that they had previously performed as organizers, supervisors and competitors. This is the first in-depth study of sporting culture in Britain during the first half of the nineteenth century that is based upon sporting periodicals, newspapers and sporting archives. Harvey depicts a society that is not suffering from a severe attack on recreations by commerce, industry and government, but one in which the principal problems experienced stemmed from criminal activity. As such, this book provides a much-needed revision of many misconceptions about the early history of sport in Britain.

Amateurism in British Sport

It Matters Not Who Won or Lost?
Author: Dilwyn Porter,Stephen Wagg
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136802908
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 212
View: 7664

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The ideal of the amateur competitor, playing the game for love and, unlike the professional, totally untainted by commerce, has become embedded in many accounts of the development of modern sport. It has proved influential not least because it has underpinned a pervasive impression of professionalism - and all that came with it - as a betrayal of innocence, a fall from sporting grace. In the essays collected here, amateurism, both as ideology and practice, is subject to critical and unsentimental scrutiny, effectively challenging the dominant narrative of more conventional histories of British sport. Most modern sports, even those where professionalism developed rapidly, originated in an era when the gentlemanly amateur predominated, both in politics and society, as well as in the realm of sport. Enforcement of rules and conventions that embodied the amateur-elite ethos effectively limited opportunities for working-class competitors to ‘turn the world upside down’. This book was previously published as a special issue of Sport in History.