Sociologists, Economists, and Democracy


Author: Brian Barry
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226038247
Category: Social Science
Page: 202
View: 6324

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"Rationalist theories of political behavior have recently risen in status to that of a new—or, more accurately, rediscovered—paradigm in the systematic study of politics. Brian Barry's short, provocative book played no small part in the debate that precipitated this shift. . . . Without reservation, Barry's treatise is the most lucid and most influential critique of two important, competing perspectives in political analysis: the 'sociological' school of Talcott Parsons, Gabriel Almond, and other so-called functionalists; and the 'economic' school of Anthony Downs and Mancur Olson, among others."—Dennis J. Encarnation, American Journal of Sociology

Economics and Sociology

Redefining Their Boundaries : Conversations with Economists and Sociologists
Author: Richard Swedberg
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691003764
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 361
View: 1022

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The boundary between economics and sociology is presently being redefined--but how, why, and by whom? Richard Swedberg answers these questions in this thought-provoking book of conversations with well-known economists and sociologists. Among the economists interviewed are Gary Becker, Amartya Sen, Kenneth Arrow, and Albert O. Hirschman; the sociologists include Daniel Bell, Harrison White, James Coleman, and Mark Granovetter. The picture that emerges is that economists and sociologists have paid little attention to each other during most of the twentieth century: social problems have been analyzed as if they had no economic dimension and economic problems as if they had no social dimension. Today, however, there is a dialogue between the two fields, as economists take on social topics and as sociologists become interested in rational choice and "new economic sociology." The interviewees describe how they came to challenge the present separation between economics and sociology, what they think of the various proposals to integrate the fields, and how they envision the future. The author summarizes the results of the conversations in the final chapter. The individual interviews also serve as superb introductions to the work of these scholars.

Political Sociology - The State of the Art


Author: Subrata K Mitra,Malte Pehl,Clemens Spieß
Publisher: Verlag Barbara Budrich
ISBN: 3866497326
Category: Political Science
Page: 156
View: 3450

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The World of Political Science - New volumes The book traces the disciplinary development of political sociology and the transdisciplinary research into the overlapping issues involving politics and society. The contributions cover overviews of the history, methodological and theoretical development of this academic discipline. Successes as well as failures in past, unexplored areas and salient issues in ongoing research are also highlighted. From the Contents: Subrata K. Mitra and Malte Pehl, Taking Stock of Political Sociology Dirk Berg-Schlosser, Political Culture at a Crossroads? Kay Lawson and Mildred Schwartz, Parties, Interest Groups and Social Movements: Shall Change be Mid - wife to Truth? Eva Etzioni-Halevy, Socio-Political Inequalities: Elites, Classes and Democracy Prakash Sarangi, Contemporary Approaches to the Study of the State Jan van Deth, Political Sociology: Old Concerns and New Directions

The Economics and Sociology of Capitalism


Author: Joseph Alois Schumpeter
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691003832
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 492
View: 5958

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The renowned economist Joseph A. Schumpeter (1883-1950) made seminal contributions not only to economic theory but also to sociology and economic history. His work is now attracting wide attention among sociologists, as well as experiencing a remarkable revival among economists. This anthology, which serves as an excellent introduction to Schumpeter, emphasizes his broad socio-economic vision and his attempt to analyze economic reality from several different perspectives. An ambitious introductory essay by Richard Swedberg uses many new sources to enhance our understanding of Schumpeter's life and work and to help analyze his fascinating character. This essay stresses Schumpeter's ability to draw on several social sciences in his study of capitalism. Some of the articles in the anthology are published for the first time. The most important of these are Schumpeter's Lowell Lectures from 1941, "An Economic Interpretation of Our Time." Also included is the transcript of his lecture "Can Capitalism Survive?" (1936) and the high-spirited debate that followed. The anthology contains many of Schumpeter's classical sociological articles, such as his essays on the tax state, imperialism, and social classes. And, finally, there are lesser known articles on the future of private enterprise, on the concept of rationality in the social sciences, and on the work of Max Weber, with whom Schumpeter collaborated on several occasions.

A Critical Dictionary of Sociology


Author: Raymond Boudon,Francois Bourricaud
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134978987
Category: Social Science
Page: 452
View: 2253

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Unlike most other sociology or social science dictionaries, in this translation of the Critical Dictionary of Sociology, taken from the second French edition of the Dictionary and edited by the English sociologist Peter Hamilton, the critical value of this distinctive work is at last made available for a wider audience. Each entry grapples directly with an issue, whether theoretical, epistemological, philosophical, political or empirical, and provides a strong statement of what the authors think about it. The discussions are considered but argumentative. By reaffirming that a non-marxist style of critique is still possible, Boudon and Bourricaud have presented a distinctive approach to the key issues which confront the societies of the Twentieth and Twenty-First centuries. For some this work will be a textbook, for others an indispensable sourcebook of sociological concepts, and for most a way of opening our eyes to new dimensions in our understanding of the great ideas and theories of sociology.

The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Political Sociology


Author: Edwin Amenta,Kate Nash,Alan Scott
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444355074
Category: Social Science
Page: 576
View: 9620

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The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Political Sociology is a complete reference guide, reflecting the scope and quality of the discipline, and highlighting emerging topics in the field. Global in focus, offering up-to-date topics from an interdisciplinary, international set of scholars addressing key issues concerning globalization, social movements, and citizenship The majority of chapters are new, including those on environmental politics, international terrorism, security, corruption, and human rights Revises and updates all previously published chapters to include new themes and topics in political sociology Provides an overview of scholarship in the field, with chapters working independently and collectively to examine the full range of contributions to political sociology Offers a challenging yet accessible and complete reference guide for students and scholars

War and Change in World Politics


Author: Robert Gilpin
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521273763
Category: Political Science
Page: 272
View: 9179

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War and Change in World Politics introduces the reader to an important new theory of international political change. Arguing that the fundamental nature of international relations has not changed over the millennia, Professor Gilpin uses history, sociology, and economic theory to identify the forces causing change in the world order. The discussion focuses on the differential growth of power in the international system and the result of this unevenness. A shift in the balance of power - economic or military - weakens the foundations of the existing system, because those gaining power see the increasing benefits and the decreasing cost of changing the system. The result, maintains Gilpin, is that actors seek to alter the system through territorial, political, or economic expansion until the marginal costs of continuing change are greater than the marginal benefits. When states develop the power to change the system according to their interests they will strive to do so- either by increasing economic efficiency and maximizing mutual gain, or by redistributing wealth and power in their own favour.

Research Strategies in the Social Sciences

A Guide to New Approaches
Author: Elinor Scarbrough,Eric Tanenbaum
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198292388
Category: Political Science
Page: 316
View: 3928

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In this volume, a team of experts sets out various analytic tools available to social scientists from social science methodology. It guides them through the maze of advanced techniques applicable across the range of the social sciences.

Recht als Sinn und Institution


Author: Dorothea Mayer-Maly,Ilmar Tammelo,Ota Weinberger,Michaela Strasser
Publisher: Duncker & Humblot
ISBN: 9783428457236
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 591

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Tweeting to Power

The Social Media Revolution in American Politics
Author: Jason Gainous,Kevin M. Wagner
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199350639
Category: Political Science
Page: 224
View: 9759

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Online social media are changing the face of politics in the United States. Beginning with a strong theoretical foundation grounded in political, communications and psychology literature, Tweeting to Power examines the effect of online social media on how people come to learn, understand and engage in politics. Gainous and Wagner propose that platforms such as Facebook and Twitter offer the opportunity for a new information flow that is no longer being structured and limited by the popular media. Television and newspapers, which were traditionally the sole or primary gatekeeper, can no longer limit or govern what information is exchanged. By lowering the cost of both supplying the information and obtaining it, social networking applications have recreated how, when and where people are informed. To establish this premise, Gainous and Wagner analyze multiple datasets, quantitative and qualitative, exploring and measuring the use of social media by voters and citizens as well as the strategies and approaches adopted by politicians and elected officials. They illustrate how these new and growing online communities are new forums for the exchange of information that is governed by relationships formed and maintained outside traditional media. Using empirical measures, they prove both how candidates utilize Twitter to shape the information voters rely upon and how effective this effort was at garnering votes in the 2010 congressional elections. With both theory and data, Gainous and Wagner show how the social media revolution is creating a new paradigm for political communication and shifting the very foundation of the political process.

Cooperation under Fire

Anglo-German Restraint during World War II
Author: Jeffrey W. Legro
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801469902
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 4448

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Why do nations cooperate even as they try to destroy each other? Jeffrey Legro explores this question in the context of World War II, the "total" war that in fact wasn't. During the war, combatant states attempted to sustain agreements limiting the use of three forms of combat considered barbarous—submarine attacks against civilian ships, strategic bombing of civilian targets, and chemical warfare. Looking at how these restraints worked or failed to work between such fierce enemies as Hitler's Third Reich and Churchill's Britain, Legro offers a new understanding of the dynamics of World War II and the sources of international cooperation. While traditional explanations of cooperation focus on the relations between actors, Cooperation under Fire examines what warring nations seek and why they seek it—the "preference formation" that undergirds international interaction. Scholars and statesmen debate whether it is the balance of power or the influence of international norms that most directly shapes foreign policy goals. Critically assessing both explanations, Legro argues that it was, rather, the organizational cultures of military bureaucracies—their beliefs and customs in waging war—that decided national priorities for limiting the use of force in World War II. Drawing on documents from Germany, Britain, the United States, and the former Soviet Union, Legro provides a compelling account of how military cultures molded state preferences and affected the success of cooperation. In its clear and cogent analysis, this book has significant implications for the theory and practice of international relations.

Dialogues with Contemporary Political Theorists


Author: G. Browning,R. Prokhovnik,M. Dimova-Cookson
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137271299
Category: Political Science
Page: 225
View: 3635

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A lively and engaging collection which explains the various strands of political theory, identifies key futures trends and explores the foundations of contemporary debate. Features interviews with pre-eminent theorists, including Quentin Skinner, Carole Pateman and Alex Honneth.

Coalitions in Parliamentary Government


Author: L. Dodd
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400868076
Category: Political Science
Page: 306
View: 7660

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For eighty years, students of parliamentary democracy have argued that durable cabinets require majority party government. Lawrence Dodd challenges this widely held belief and offers in its place a revisionist interpretation based on contemporary game theory. He argues for a fundamental alteration in existing conceptions of the relationship between party systems and parliamentary government. The author notes that cabinet durability depends on the coalitional status of the party or parties that form the cabinet. This status is created by the fractionalization, instability, and polarization that characterize the parliamentary party system. Cabinets of minimum winning status are likely to endure; as they depart from minimum winning status, their durability should decrease. Hypotheses derived from the author's theory arc examined against the experience of seventeen Western nations from 1918 to 1974. Making extensive use of quantitative analysis, the author compares behavioral patterns in multiparty and majority party parliaments, contrasts interwar and postwar parliaments, and examines the consistency of key behavioral patterns according to country. He concludes that a key to durable government is the minimum winning status of the cabinet, which may be attained in multiparty or majority party parliaments. Originally published in 1976. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Problem of Political Marketing


Author: Heather Savigny
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1441192026
Category: Political Science
Page: 158
View: 3864

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Based upon analysis of existing theoretical literature and current political practice this book addresses both the use of marketing and its impact (real and potential) upon democracy by answering the following: * Why have politicians adopted political marketing? What are the contextual factors that have led to this? * How does the political marketing literature model this activity? * What are the underlying assumptions of these models * How does political marketing affect democracy? * How is political marketing best conceptualised and understood in light of this critical analysis?

Democracy and Welfare Economics


Author: Hans van den Doel,Ben van Velthoven
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521436373
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 212
View: 9428

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This book is a fully revised and updated version of Hans van den Doel's Democracy and Welfare Economics. It presents the economic theory of political decision-making (otherwise known as new political economy, or public choice), providing students with an accessible and clear introduction to this important subject. The authors identify four different methods of decision-making by which the political process transforms the demands of individual citizens into government policy, and these are analyzed in turn with reference to economic theory.

Democracy, Economics, and the Public Good

Informational Failures and Potential
Author: J. Budd
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137446285
Category: Political Science
Page: 208
View: 423

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Examining essential aspects of American life, John Budd investigates how informational sources (print and broadcast media and other resources) fall short when it comes to informing citizens, failing our democracy and damaging the public good.

Democracy

A Comparative Approach
Author: Svante Ersson,Jan-Erik Lane
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135136424
Category: Political Science
Page: 320
View: 1690

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What is democracy? Under what conditions does it thrive? What are the consequences of democracy? This book aims to answer these questions and more by exploring different varieties of democracies around the world. It starts with definitions of democracy and then divides the concept into three dimensions, which provide a framework for the study of democracy in all its forms. These dimensions form the three main sections of the book: *constitutional democracy which explores political rights *participatory democracy which focuses on participation of citizens *egalitarian democracy which examines outcomes of democracy in terms of equality. Democracy concludes by surveying the findings of this empirical study and a discussion on the meanings and consequences of democracy in a globalizing world.