Comparative Methods in the Social Sciences


Author: Neil J. Smelser
Publisher: Quid Pro Books
ISBN: 1610271777
Category: Social Science
Page: 270
View: 8843

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Even after teaching generations of social scientists, Neil Smelser's classic book remains the most definitive statement of methodological issues for all comparative scholars and in political science, anthropology, sociology, economics and psychology. Such issues are timeless and therefore Smelser's lucid analysis remains timely and relevant. Smelser posits a methodological continuity between the comparative studies of past masters and the more recent flow of contemporary comparative work. To that end, he takes a pragmatic, critical look at the classic studies of Alexis de Tocqueville, Emile Durkheim, and Max Weber. His analyses respect the historical specifics and contexts of their work, but at the same time raise general issues such as cross-unit comparability, empirical representation of theoretical concepts and measures, and historical causality. The book also deals with the ongoing flows of comparative study in the social sciences, which, while methodologically more self-conscious than past work, nevertheless face a common set of issues, including causation and classification. The book's unique clarity makes it particularly useful for working scholars as well as students fighting their way through the methodological thickets of comparative studies.

Handbook of Survey Research


Author: Peter H. Rossi,James D Wright,Andy B. Anderson
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 1483276309
Category: Social Science
Page: 774
View: 8553

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Handbook of Survey Research provides an introduction to the theory and practice of sample survey research. It addresses both the student who desires to master these topics and the practicing survey researcher who needs a source that codifies, rationalizes, and presents existing theory and practice. The handbook can be organized into three major parts. Part 1 sets forth the basic theoretical issues involved in sampling, measurement, and management of survey organizations. Part 2 deals mainly with ""hands-on,"" how-to-do-it issues: how to draw theoretically acceptable samples, how to write questionnaires, how to combine responses into appropriate scales and indices, how to avoid response effects and measurement errors, how actually to go about gathering survey data, how to avoid missing data (and what to do when you cannot), and other topics of a similar nature. Part 3 considers the analysis of survey data, with separate chapters for each of the three major multivariate analysis modes and one chapter on the uses of surveys in monitoring overtime trends. This handbook will be valuable both to advanced students and to practicing survey researchers seeking a detailed guide to the major issues in the design and analysis of sample surveys and to current state of the art practices in sample surveys.

Log-Linear Models


Author: David Knoke,Peter J. Burke
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9780803914926
Category: Mathematics
Page: 80
View: 2324

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Discusses the innovative log-linear model of statistical analysis. This model makes no distinction between independent and dependent variables, but is used to examine relationships among categoric variables by analyzing expected cell frequencies.

Handbook of Emergent Methods


Author: Sharlene Nagy Hesse-Biber,Patricia Leavy
Publisher: Guilford Publications
ISBN: 1462514804
Category: Social Science
Page: 740
View: 2424

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Social researchers increasingly find themselves looking beyond conventional methods to address complex research questions. This is the first book to comprehensively examine emergent qualitative and quantitative theories and methods across the social and behavioral sciences. Providing scholars and students with a way to retool their research choices, the volume presents cutting-edge approaches to data collection, analysis, and representation. Leading researchers describe alternative uses of traditional quantitative and qualitative tools; innovative hybrid or mixed methods; and new techniques facilitated by technological advances. Consistently formatted chapters explore the strengths and limitations of each method for studying different types of research questions and offer practical, in-depth examples.

Concept Formation in the Humanities and the Social Sciences


Author: T. Pawlowski
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400990197
Category: Philosophy
Page: 236
View: 6335

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Uniqueness of style versus plurality of styles: in terms of these aesthetic categories one of the most important differences between the recent past and the present can be described. This difference manifests itself in all spheres of life - in fashion, in everyday life, in the arts, in science. What is of interest for my purposes in this book are its manifestations in the processes of con cept formation as they occur in the humanities, broadly conceived. Here the following methodological approaches seem to dominate the scene. 1. A tendency to apply semiotic concepts in various fields of research. 2. Attempts to introduce metrical concepts and measurement, even into disciplines tra ditionally considered as unamenable to mathematical treatment, like aesthetics and theory of art. 3. Efforts to fmd ways of formulating empirically testable, operational criteria for the application of concepts, especially concepts which refer to objects directly not observable, like dispositions, attitudes, character or personality traits. Care is also taken to take advantage of the conceptual apparatus of methodology to express problems in the humanities with the highest possible degree of clarity and precision. 4. Analysis of the p~rsuasive function oflanguage and its possible uses in science and in everyday life. The above tendencies are present in this book. It is divided into two parts: I. Methods of Concept Formation, and II. Applications. In the first part some general methods of concept formation are presented and their merits discussed.

Social Measurement

Current Issues
Author: George W. Bohrnstedt,Edgar Borgatta
Publisher: SAGE Publications, Incorporated
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 254
View: 7752

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Measurement in social science research has only recently begun to command attention. With a shift in attitudes towards causal modelling and the use of parametric statistics, interest in formal measurement models has grown. Bohrnstedt and Borgatta aim to stimulate further theoretical research into sociological measurement, and to provide examples of how these techniques can be applied in research. This timely compilation will benefit those who are interested in quantitative methods, particularly researchers, educators, and advanced students in the social sciences.

Body, Mind, and Method

Essays in Honor of Virgil C. Aldrich
Author: Donald F. Gustafson,B.L. Tapscott
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400994796
Category: Philosophy
Page: 314
View: 1928

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Simple seeing. Plain talking. Language in use and persons in action. These are among the themes of Virgil Aldrich's writings, from the 1930's onward. Throughout these years, he has been an explorer of conceptual geography: not as a foreign visitor studying an alien land, but close up 'in the language in which we live, move, and have our being'. This is his work. It is clear to those who know him best that he also has fun at it. Yet, in the terms of his oft-cited distinction, it is equally clear that he is to be counted not among the funsters of philosophy, but among its most committed workers. Funsters are those who attempt to do epistemology, metaphysics, or analysis by appealing to examples which are purely imaginary, totally fictional, as unrealistic as you like, 'completely unheard of'. Such imaginative wilfullness takes philosophers away from, not nearer to, 'the rough ground' (Wittgenstein) where our concepts have their origin and working place. In the funsters' imagined, 'barely possible' (but actually impossible) world, simple seeing becomes transformed into the sensing of sense-data; plain talk is rejected as imprecise, vague, and misleading; and per sons in action show up as ensouled physical objects in motion. Then the fly is in the bottle, buzzing out its tedious tunes: the problem of perception of the external world; the problem of meaning and what it is; the mind-body problem. Image-mongering has got the best of image-management.

Methodological issues in aging research


Author: Klaus Warner Schaie,National Institute on Aging. Behavioral and Social Research Program,National Institutes of Health (U.S.). Human Development and Aging Study Section. Subcommittee 2,National Institutes of Health (U.S.). Human Development and Aging Study Section
Publisher: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: N.A
Category: Medical
Page: 260
View: 9928

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