Sisters of the Earth

Women's Prose and Poetry about Nature
Author: Lorraine Anderson
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 1400033217
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 469
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Presents an anthology of poetry, essays, stories, and journal entries by Emily Dickinson, Zora Neale Hurston, Diane Ackerman, Ursula Le Guin, Terry Tempest Williams, Willa Cather, and many others who offer a personal view of humankind's relationship with the natural world. Original.

Can Poetry Save the Earth?

A Field Guide to Nature Poems
Author: John Felstiner
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300155530
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 435
View: 8935

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In forty brief and lucid chapters, Felstiner presents those voices that have most strongly spoken to and for the natural world. Poets- from the Romantics through Whitman and Dickinson to Elizabeth Bishop and Gary Snyder- have helped us envision such details as ocean winds eroding and rebuilding dunes in the same breath, wild deer freezing in our presence, and a person carving initials on a still-living stranded whale.

Earth & Eros

A Celebration in Words and Photographs
Author: Lorraine Anderson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781940468280
Category: Nature
Page: 132
View: 5882

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In the tradition of The Sense of Wonder by Rachel Carson and On the Loose by Terry and Renny Russell, Earth & Eros combines words and photographs to inspire readers to deepen their connection with the good Earth. The book awakens readers to the full force of eros — life force that connects us to our bodies, other humans, all living beings, and the Earth as a living being. Intended as an antidote to an age obsessed by speed, screens, and machines, this book brings together previously published prose and poetry with 25 fine art landscape photographs to explore the sacred erotic dimension of humans’ relationship to the Earth. The writings in Earth & Eros were chosen for their brevity, readability, beauty, and potency, and the photographs for their sensuality. Readers engage with writers such as David James Duncan, Hart Crane, Diane Ackerman, Sherman Alexie, D. H. Lawrence, Mary Oliver, and Pablo Neruda. Some of the pieces of writing are explicitly sexual, while others appreciate the sensuality of tree limbs, seeping water, mushrooms, and ferns. Earth and Eros is beautifully produced and a pleasure to hold and to look at, a book to read and reread slowly, out loud.

At Home on this Earth

Two Centuries of U.S. Women's Nature Writing
Author: Lorraine Anderson,Thomas S. Edwards
Publisher: UPNE
ISBN: 9781584651932
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 404
View: 8246

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The canon of U.S. nature writing, like the literary canon in general, has long been male-centered. But as this anthology shows, women’s voices have been there since the early Republic. At Home on This Earth features the most readable and accomplished pieces of nature writing by more than 50 U.S. women authors, from the early 19th century to the present. Spanning a range of genres including memoir, story, journal entry, sketch, and essay, it brings together pieces long out of print by such forgotten authors as Elizabeth C. Wright and Edith Thomas with selections by such well-known and acclaimed authors as Rachel Carson and Alice Walker. Moving far beyond the customary association of nature writing with New England and its Yankee progenitors, the book offers work from across the United States by Jewish, Asian, Hispanic, African American, and Native American women. With its rich diversity in voices, attitudes, and styles, this anthology expands the definition of nature writing, recognizes the specific contribution of women to this genre, and shows their unique relation to the natural world. Designed for undergraduate courses as well as for general readers, the book includes a short biography of the author preceding each selection. A bibliography and list of further reading is included, as well as an index of authors and titles. Lorraine Anderson’s introduction traces for the first time a distinct tradition of women’s nature writing in the United States. Contributors — Mary Hunter Austin, Marilou Awiakta, Florence Merriam Bailey, Fabiola Cabeza de Vaca, Sally Carrighar, Rachel Carson, Denise Chávez, Anna Botsford Comstock, Susan Fenimore Cooper, Terri de la Peña, Annie Dillard, Marjory Stoneman Douglas, Gretel Ehrlich, Virginia Eifert, Louise Erdrich, Margaret Fuller, Susan Griffin, Charlotte Forten Grimké, Linda Hasselstrom, Julia Butterfly Hill, Linda Hogan, bell hooks, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, Pam Houston, Sue Hubbell, Florence Page Jaques, Sarah Orne Jewett, Josephine Johnson, Diana Kappel-Smith, Caroline Kirkland, Maxine Kumin, Anne LaBastille, Ursula K. Le Guin, Meridel Le Sueur, Mabel Dodge Luhan, Ellen Meloy, Olive Thorne Miller, Brenda Peterson, Gene Stratton Porter, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Sharman Apt Russell, Leslie Marmon Silko, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Celia Laighton Thaxter, Edith M. Thomas, Alice Walker, Evelyn C. White, Terry Tempest Williams, Elizabeth C. Wright, Mabel Osgood Wright, Ann Zwinger

Nothing On Earth


Author: Conor O'Callaghan
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1473540372
Category: Fiction
Page: 192
View: 4013

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'As fine as it is frightening' JOHN BANVILLE 'This one will stay with you like your shadow' Guardian 'Extraordinary . . . pitch-perfect' Irish Times 'Strange, beautiful and quietly terrifying' DONAL RYAN, author of The Spinning Heart 'Like many great works, it could so easily have all gone wrong if it hadn’t been done exactly right' Sunday Independent It is the hottest August in living memory. A frightened girl bangs on a door. A man answers. From the moment he invites her in, his world will never be the same again. She will tell him about her family, and their strange life in the show home of an abandoned housing estate. The long, blistering days spent sunbathing; the airless nights filled with inexplicable noises; the words that appear on the windows, written in dust. Why are members of her family disappearing, one by one? Is she telling the truth? Is he? In a world where reality is beginning to blur, how can we know what to believe?

Helium


Author: Rudy Francisco
Publisher: Button Poetry
ISBN: 1943735352
Category: Poetry
Page: 95
View: 795

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Helium is the debut poetry collection by internet phenom Rudy Francisco, whose work has defined poetry for a generation of new readers. Rudy's poems and quotes have been viewed and shared millions of times as he has traveled the country and the world performing for sell-out crowds. Helium is filled with work that is simultaneously personal and political, blending love poems, self-reflection, and biting cultural critique on class, race and gender into an unforgettable whole. Ultimately, Rudy's work rises above the chaos to offer a fresh and positive perspective of shared humanity and beauty.

Music and the Skillful Listener

American Women Compose the Natural World
Author: Denise Von Glahn
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253006627
Category: Music
Page: 397
View: 8995

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Explores the relationship between listening and musical composition focusing on nine American women composers inspired by the sounds of the natural world

Beyond Nature's Housekeepers

American Women in Environmental History
Author: Nancy C. Unger
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199986002
Category: Social Science
Page: 336
View: 777

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From pre-Columbian times to the environmental justice movements of the present, women and men frequently responded to the environment and environmental issues in profoundly different ways. Although both environmental history and women's history are flourishing fields, explorations of the synergy produced by the interplay between environment and sex, sexuality, and gender are just beginning. Offering more than biographies of great women in environmental history, Beyond Nature's Housekeepers examines the intersections that shaped women's unique environmental concerns and activism and that framed the way the larger culture responded. Women featured include Native Americans, colonists, enslaved field workers, pioneers, homemakers, municipal housekeepers, immigrants, hunters, nature writers, soil conservationists, scientists, migrant laborers, nuclear protestors, and environmental justice activists. As women, they fared, thought, and acted in ways complicated by social, political, and economic norms, as well as issues of sexuality and childbearing. Nancy C. Unger reveals how women have played a unique role, for better and sometimes for worse, in the shaping of the American environment.

The Prophet


Author: Kahlil Gibran
Publisher: Head of Zeus Ltd
ISBN: 1786695995
Category: Fiction
Page: 64
View: 4534

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The Prophet is a book of 26 prose poetry fables written in English by the Lebanese-American artist, philosopher and writer Kahlil Gibran. Originally published in 1923, it is Gibran's best known work and has been translated into over 40 different languages. The prophet, Almustafa, has lived in the foreign city of Orphalese for 12 years and is about to board a ship which will carry him home. He is stopped by a group of people, with whom he discusses topics such as life and the human condition. The book is divided into chapters dealing with work, love, marriage, eating and drinking, joy and sorrow, self-knowledge, teaching, friendship, pleasure, beauty, religion, crime and punishment, reason and passion, and death.

Gaither's Dictionary of Scientific Quotations

A Collection of Approximately 27,000 Quotations Pertaining to Archaeology, Architecture, Astronomy, Biology, Botany, Chemistry, Cosmology, Darwinism, Engineering, Geology, Mathematics, Medicine, Nature, Nursing, Paleontology, Philosophy, Physics, Probability, Science, Statistics, Technology, Theory, Universe, and Zoology
Author: Carl C. Gaither,Alma E. Cavazos-Gaither
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461411149
Category: Science
Page: 2867
View: 2870

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This unprecedented collection of 27,000 quotations is the most comprehensive and carefully researched of its kind, covering all fields of science and mathematics. With this vast compendium you can readily conceptualize and embrace the written images of scientists, laymen, politicians, novelists, playwrights, and poets about humankind's scientific achievements. Approximately 9000 high-quality entries have been added to this new edition to provide a rich selection of quotations for the student, the educator, and the scientist who would like to introduce a presentation with a relevant quotation that provides perspective and historical background on his subject. Gaither's Dictionary of Scientific Quotations, Second Edition, provides the finest reference source of science quotations for all audiences. The new edition adds greater depth to the number of quotations in the various thematic arrangements and also provides new thematic categories.

How to Read a Poem

And Fall in Love with Poetry
Author: Edward Hirsch
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780547543727
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 288
View: 4675

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"Read a poem to yourself in the middle of the night. Turn on a single lamp and read it while you're alone in an otherwise dark room or while someone sleeps next to you. Say it over to yourself in a place where silence reigns and the din of culture—the constant buzzing noise that surrounds you—has momentarily stopped. This poem has come from a great distance to find you." So begins this astonishing book by one of our leading poets and critics. In an unprecedented exploration of the genre, Hirsch writes about what poetry is, why it matters, and how we can open up our imaginations so that its message—which is of vital importance in day-to-day life—can reach us and make a difference. For Hirsch, poetry is not just a part of life, it is life, and expresses like no other art our most sublime emotions. In a marvelous reading of world poetry, including verse by such poets as Wallace Stevens, Elizabeth Bishop, Pablo Neruda, William Wordsworth, Sylvia Plath, Charles Baudelaire, and many more, Hirsch discovers the meaning of their words and ideas and brings their sublime message home into our hearts. A masterful work by a master poet, this brilliant summation of poetry and human nature will speak to all readers who long to place poetry in their lives but don't know how to read it.

Visions of the Land

Science, Literature, and the American Environment from the Era of Exploration to the Age of Ec
Author: Michael A. Bryson
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 0813921066
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 228
View: 9383

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"Visions of the Land looks at the period from 1840 to 1970 through the works of seven explorers, scientists, and writers, in order to examine the various ways our culture has viewed nature. In this ambitious work, Michael A. Bryson draws upon a wide array of references (narratives, technical reports, natural histories, scientific autobiographies, fictional utopias, and popular scientific literature), to better illustrate the constantly changing manner in which our culture has chosen to conceptualize nature. Dividing the book into three parts, "Narratives of Exploration and the Scientist-Hero," "Imagined Communities and the Scientific Management of Nature," and "Nature's Identity and the Critique of Science," Bryson discusses the works of John C. Fremont, Richard Byrd, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, John Wesley Powell, Susan Cooper, Rachel Carson, and Loren Eiseley"--H-Net.

Spirit of the Earth

Indian Voices on Nature
Author: Michael Oren Fitzgerald,Joseph A. Fitzgerald
Publisher: World Wisdom Books
ISBN: 9781936597543
Category: Nature
Page: 136
View: 1418

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This book includes quotations on the beauty and meaning of nature from men and women of nearly fifty North American tribes. The illustrations include historical photographs of American Indians, as well as a wide selection of contemporary photographs showing the diversity of North American landscapes. These quotations and photographs beautifully present something of nature s timeless message. This message can be summed up in the well-known Sioux phrase often used in prayer: We are all related. "

A Room of One's Own (Annotated)


Author: Virginia Woolf
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0544535162
Category: Fiction
Page: 216
View: 9416

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In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf imagines that Shakespeare had a sister: a sister equal to Shakespeare in talent, equal in genius, but whose legacy is radically different.This imaginary woman never writes a word and dies by her own hand, her genius unexpressed. But if only she had found the means to create, urges Woolf, she would have reached the same heights as her immortal sibling. In this classic essay,Virginia Woolf takes on the establishment, using her gift of language to dissect the world around her and give a voice to those who have none. Her message is simple: A woman must have a fixed income and a room of her own in order to have the freedom to create. Annotated and with an introduction by Susan Gubar

Endymion


Author: John Keats
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Endymion (Greek mythology)
Page: 140
View: 2129

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The Swerve: How the World Became Modern


Author: Stephen Greenblatt
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393083381
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 4661

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Winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Non-Fiction Winner of the 2011 National Book Award for Non-Fiction One of the world's most celebrated scholars, Stephen Greenblatt has crafted both an innovative work of history and a thrilling story of discovery, in which one manuscript, plucked from a thousand years of neglect, changed the course of human thought and made possible the world as we know it. Nearly six hundred years ago, a short, genial, cannily alert man in his late thirties took a very old manuscript off a library shelf, saw with excitement what he had discovered, and ordered that it be copied. That book was the last surviving manuscript of an ancient Roman philosophical epic, On the Nature of Things, by Lucretius—a beautiful poem of the most dangerous ideas: that the universe functioned without the aid of gods, that religious fear was damaging to human life, and that matter was made up of very small particles in eternal motion, colliding and swerving in new directions. The copying and translation of this ancient book-the greatest discovery of the greatest book-hunter of his age-fueled the Renaissance, inspiring artists such as Botticelli and thinkers such as Giordano Bruno; shaped the thought of Galileo and Freud, Darwin and Einstein; and had a revolutionary influence on writers such as Montaigne and Shakespeare and even Thomas Jefferson.

Milk and Honey


Author: Rupi Kaur
Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing
ISBN: 1449478654
Category: Poetry
Page: 208
View: 5803

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The book is divided into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose. Deals with a different pain. Heals a different heartache. Milk and Honey takes readers through a journey of the most bitter moments in life and finds sweetness in them because there is sweetness everywhere if you are just willing to look.

Citizen

An American Lyric
Author: Claudia Rankine
Publisher: Graywolf Press
ISBN: 1555973485
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 160
View: 8461

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* Finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry * * Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry * Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in Criticism * Winner of the NAACP Image Award * Winner of the L.A. Times Book Prize * Winner of the PEN Open Book Award * ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR: The New Yorker, Boston Globe, The Atlantic, BuzzFeed, NPR. Los Angeles Times, Publishers Weekly, Slate, Time Out New York, Vulture, Refinery 29, and many more . . . A provocative meditation on race, Claudia Rankine's long-awaited follow up to her groundbreaking book Don't Let Me Be Lonely: An American Lyric. Claudia Rankine's bold new book recounts mounting racial aggressions in ongoing encounters in twenty-first-century daily life and in the media. Some of these encounters are slights, seeming slips of the tongue, and some are intentional offensives in the classroom, at the supermarket, at home, on the tennis court with Serena Williams and the soccer field with Zinedine Zidane, online, on TV-everywhere, all the time. The accumulative stresses come to bear on a person's ability to speak, perform, and stay alive. Our addressability is tied to the state of our belonging, Rankine argues, as are our assumptions and expectations of citizenship. In essay, image, and poetry, Citizen is a powerful testament to the individual and collective effects of racism in our contemporary, often named "post-race" society.

The Book of Feral Flora


Author: Amanda Ackerman
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781934254585
Category: Plants
Page: 196
View: 5375

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Fiction. Poetry. Ecopoetics. Amanda Ackerman's THE BOOK OF FERAL FLORA collapses distinctions between narrative, poetry, and prose. Grafting stories to stones and written poems to plant rewrites generated via sensory-electronic technology, THE BOOK OF FERAL FLORA attempts to write the language of plants. From a tale of two sisters in the belly of a whale to the training of a young healer and texts written by the plants themselves, entire stories repeat, differences spread, and regrowth becomes inevitable. The result is an alchemical transformation of pastoral and romantic traditions in favor of the feral: a process of freeing, imaging in, and recovering human and non-human subjects. Ackerman worked with poetry programmer Dan Richert to produce the plant-generated poems. Read more about the process here.

The Colors of Nature

Culture, Identity, and the Natural World
Author: Alison Hawthorne Deming,Lauret E. Savoy
Publisher: Milkweed Editions
ISBN: 1571318143
Category: Nature
Page: 368
View: 4098

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From African American to Asian American, indigenous to immigrant, "multiracial" to "mixedblood," the diversity of cultures in this world is matched only by the diversity of stories explaining our cultural origins: stories of creation and destruction, displacement and heartbreak, hope and mystery. With writing from Jamaica Kincaid on the fallacies of national myths, Yusef Komunyakaa connecting the toxic legacy of his hometown, Bogalusa, LA, to a blind faith in capitalism, and bell hooks relating the quashing of multiculturalism to the destruction of nature that is considered "unpredictable" — amongst more than 35 other examinations of the relationship between culture and nature — this collection points toward the trouble of ignoring our cultural heritage, but also reveals how opening our eyes and our minds might provide a more livable future. Contributors: Elmaz Abinader, Faith Adiele, Francisco X. Alarcón, Fred Arroyo, Kimberly Blaeser, Joseph Bruchac, Robert D. Bullard, Debra Kang Dean, Camille Dungy, Nikky Finney, Ray Gonzalez, Kimiko Hahn, bell hooks, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, Pualani Kanaka‘ole Kanahele, Robin Wall Kimmerer, Jamaica Kincaid, Yusef Komunyakaa, J. Drew Lanham, David Mas Masumoto, Maria Melendez, Thyllias Moss, Gary Paul Nabhan, Nalini Nadkarni, Melissa Nelson, Jennifer Oladipo, Louis Owens, Enrique Salmon, Aileen Suzara, A. J. Verdelle, Gerald Vizenor, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Al Young, Ofelia Zepeda