Shakespeare and Appropriation


Author: Christy Desmet,Robert Sawyer
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134622619
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 256
View: 5200

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The vitality of our culture is still often measured by the status Shakespeare has within it. Contemporary readers and writers continue to exploit Shakespeare's cultural afterlife in a vivid and creative way. This fascinating collection of original essays shows how writers' efforts to imitate, contradict, compete with, and reproduce Shakespeare keep him in the cultural conversation. The essays: * analyze the methods and motives of Shakespearean appropriation * investigate theoretically the return of the repressed author in discussions of Shakespeare's cultural function * put into dialogue theoretical and literary responses to Shakespeare's cultural authority * analyze works ranging from nineteenth century to the present, and genres ranging from poetry and the novel to Disney movies.

Shakespeare, the King's Playwright

Theater in the Stuart Court, 1603-1613
Author: Alvin B. Kernan
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300072587
Category: Drama
Page: 230
View: 8955

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Eminent literary critic Alvin Kernan takes us back to the court performances of some of Shakespeare's most famous plays, showing how the courtly setting influenced the bard's work. Kernan argues that Shakespeare was a great dramatist whose plays commented on political and social concerns of his patrons and who adjusted his own art to pander to court needs. 30 illustrations.

English Court Theatre, 1558-1642


Author: John H. Astington
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521030064
Category: Drama
Page: 293
View: 2816

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A full account of court theatre in the Elizabethan and Stuart periods.

Shakespeare, Court Dramatist


Author: Richard Dutton
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0191083321
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 320
View: 7273

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Shakespeare, Court Dramatist centres around the contention that the courts of both Elizabeth I and James I loomed much larger in Shakespeare's creative life than is usually appreciated. Richard Dutton argues that many, perhaps most, of Shakespeare's plays have survived in versions adapted for court presentation, where length was no object (and indeed encouraged) and rhetorical virtuosity was appreciated. The first half of the study examines the court's patronage of the theatre during Shakespeare's lifetime and the crucial role of its Masters of the Revels, who supervised all performances there (as well as censoring plays for public performance). Dutton examines the emergence of the Lord Chamberlain's Men and the King's Men, to whom Shakespeare was attached as their 'ordinary poet', and reviews what is known about the revision of plays in the early modern period. The second half of the study focuses in detail on six of Shakespeare's plays which exist in shorter, less polished texts as well as longer, more familiar ones: Henry VI Part II and III, Romeo and Juliet, Henry V, Hamlet, and The Merry Wives of Windsor. Shakespeare, Court Dramatist argues that they are not cut down from those familiar versions, but poorly-reported originals which Shakespeare revised for court performance into what we know best today. More localised revisions in such plays as Titus Andronicus, Richard II, and Henry IV Part II can also best be explained in this context. The court, Richard Dutton argues, is what made Shakespeare Shakespeare.

Shakespeare's Common Prayers

The Book of Common Prayer and the Elizabethan Age
Author: Daniel Swift
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199976937
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 6027

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Societies and entire nations draw their identities from certain founding documents, whether charters, declarations, or manifestos. The Book of Common Prayer figures as one of the most crucial in the history of the English-speaking peoples. First published in 1549 to make accessible the devotional language of the late Henry the VIII's new church, the prayer book was a work of monumental religious, political, and cultural importance. Within its rituals, prescriptions, proscriptions, and expressions were fought the religious wars of the age of Shakespeare. This diminutive book--continuously reformed and revised--was how that age defined itself. In Shakespeare's Common Prayers, Daniel Swift makes dazzling and original use of this foundational text, employing it as an entry-point into the works of England's most celebrated writer. Though commonly neglected as a source for Shakespeare's work, Swift persuasively and conclusively argues that the Book of Common Prayer was absolutely essential to the playwright. It was in the Book's ambiguities and its fierce contestations that Shakespeare found the ready elements of drama: dispute over words and their practical consequences, hope for sanctification tempered by fear of simple meaninglessness, and the demand for improvised performance as compensation for the failure of language to fulfill its promises. What emerges is nothing less than a portrait of Shakespeare at work: absorbing, manipulating, reforming, and struggling with the explosive chemistry of word and action that comprised early modern liturgy. Swift argues that the Book of Common Prayer mediates between the secular and the devotional, producing a tension that makes Shakespeare's plays so powerful and exceptional. Tracing the prayer book's lines and motions through As You Like It, Hamlet, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, Othello, and particularly Macbeth, Swift reveals how the greatest writer of the age--of perhaps any age--was influenced and guided by its most important book.

The Masks of Anthony and Cleopatra


Author: Marvin Rosenberg
Publisher: University of Delaware Press
ISBN: 9780874139242
Category: Drama
Page: 605
View: 3708

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The Masks of Anthony and Cleopatra follows the pattern of Marvin Rosenberg's four earlier Masks books and offers a sensitive interpretation of the play based on extensive reading of both literary criticism and performance reviews. In the middle of this play of clashing values and great conflicting personalities, the unhappy Octavia - sister of the ambitious Octavius Caesar and newly married to the heroic Mark Anthony - sums up the ambiguity of her divided world in her heart-wrenching lament: Husband win, win brother, Prays and destroys the prayer; no midway 'Twixt these extremes at all. In his analysis, Marvin Rosenberg sets out to steer a path between the "extremes" of Rome and Egypt and all they stand for: and to explore the relentless "to and back" confrontation of their different sets of values which leads ultimately to destruction. What his study reveals is a world of endless oppositions and ambiguities. Reason (policy and expediency) is pitted against emotion (love and enduring relationship); the personal and private is balanced against the public and universal; the human is juxtaposed with the divine, the heroic set against the mundane and petty. Great complex characters oppose each other and are divided within themselves, both on the wide stage of the world and within their own personalities. The language is full of antithesis and oxymorons: and the most magnificent poetry is placed alongside the most simple and moving of expressions.

King Henry VIII


Author: William Shakespeare
Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521228763
Category: Drama
Page: 191
View: 3181

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Lively, instructive access to Shakespeare's rich and complex works.

Region, Religion and Patronage

Lancastrian Shakespeare
Author: Richard Dutton,Alison Findlay,Richard Wilson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 258
View: 5034

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Exploring the network of social, political and spiritual connections in north west England during Shakespeare's formative years, this text discusses how the cultural context in which the apprentice dramatist worked may have shaped him as an artist. It provides readings of Twelfth Night, Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Night's Dream, and explores the position of Lancashire as a Catholic stronghold and home to Counter-Refomation missionaries in opposition to the attempts of central government to create a united state. The text also introduces the reader to the non-metropolitan theatre spaces which formed a vital part of Early Modern dramatic activity.

Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: English literature
Page: N.A
View: 8081

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Issues focus "... on four fields of British literature which rotate quarterly as follows: winter--English Renaissance; spring--Tudor and Stuart drama; summer--Restoration and Eighteenth century; and autumn--Nineteenth century."

Tragedy's Insights

Identity, Polity, Theodicy
Author: Luis Rene Gámez
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780933951853
Category: Fiction
Page: 176
View: 8679

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Books in Print


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: American literature
Page: N.A
View: 911

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Books in print is the major source of information on books currently published and in print in the United States. The database provides the record of forthcoming books, books in-print, and books out-of-print.

The Oxford Companion to English Literature


Author: Margaret Drabble
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: N.A
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 1154
View: 3650

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Contains alphabetically arranged entries on authors, characters, and works from the world of English literature

The Two Gentlemen of Verona


Author: William Shakespeare,Barbara A. Mowat,Paul Werstine
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0671039547
Category: Drama
Page: 245
View: 1592

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A thoroughly researched, illustrated stage history reveals changing conceptions of the play.