Sentencing at the International Criminal Court

From Nuremberg to the Hague
Author: Alice Riccardi
Publisher: G Giappichelli Editore
ISBN: 8892104292
Category: Law
Page: 280
View: 1709

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This book covers sentencing in international criminal law with a particular focus on the International Criminal Court. The author gives a critical examination of the issue of sentencing rationales in international criminal law including an overview of the theories advanced by scholars.The first section studies whether it is possible to find a norm of international law providing for the aims of sentences in the law and practice of pure international criminal jurisdictions created before the entry into force of the Statute of the International Criminal Court. The second section analyses the issue of sentencing at the International Criminal Court, by focusing on the provisions of its Statute, on the relevant rules of internationally recognized human rights law and on the Court’s first practice. The book concludes with a re-organization of principles and thus offers a consistent approach to the penal justifications of sentencing for the International Criminal Court.

The Nuremberg Military Tribunals and the Origins of International Criminal Law


Author: Kevin Jon Heller
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191652865
Category: Law
Page: 536
View: 2619

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This book provides the first comprehensive legal analysis of the twelve war crimes trials held in the American zone of occupation between 1946 and 1949, collectively known as the Nuremberg Military Tribunals (NMTs). The judgments the NMTs produced have played a critical role in the development of international criminal law, particularly in terms of how courts currently understand war crimes, crimes against humanity, and the crime of aggression. The trials are also of tremendous historical importance, because they provide a far more comprehensive picture of Nazi atrocities than their more famous predecessor, the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg (IMT). The IMT focused exclusively on the 'major war criminals'-the Goerings, the Hesses, the Speers. The NMTs, by contrast, prosecuted doctors, lawyers, judges, industrialists, bankers-the private citizens and lower-level functionaries whose willingness to take part in the destruction of millions of innocents manifested what Hannah Arendt famously called 'the banality of evil'. The book is divided into five sections. The first section traces the evolution of the twelve NMT trials. The second section discusses the law, procedure, and rules of evidence applied by the tribunals, with a focus on the important differences between Law No. 10 and the Nuremberg Charter. The third section, the heart of the book, provides a systematic analysis of the tribunals' jurisprudence. It covers Law No. 10's core crimes-crimes against peace, war crimes, and crimes against humanity-as well as the crimes of conspiracy and membership in a criminal organization. The fourth section then examines the modes of participation and defenses that the tribunals recognized. The final section deals with sentencing, the aftermath of the trials, and their historical legacy.

Sentencing in International Criminal Law

The UN ad hoc Tribunals and Future Perspectives for the ICC
Author: Silvia D'Ascoli
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1847316441
Category: Law
Page: 422
View: 8354

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This book deals with sentencing in international criminal law, focusing on the approach of the UN ad hoc Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and Rwanda (ICTR). In contrast to sentencing in domestic jurisdictions, and in spite of its growing importance, sentencing law is a part of international criminal law that is still 'under construction' and is unregulated in many aspects. International sentencing law and practice is not yet defined by exact norms and principles and as yet there is no body of international principles concerning the determination of sentence, notwithstanding the huge volume of sentencing research and the extensive modern debate about sentencing principles. Moreover international judges receive very little guidance in sentencing matters: this contributes to inconsistencies and may increase the risk that similar cases will be sentenced in different ways. One purpose of this book is to investigate and evaluate the process of international sentencing, especially as interpreted by the ICTY and the ICTR, and to suggest a more comprehensive and coherent system of guiding principles, which will foster the development of a law of sentencing for international criminal justice. The book discusses the law and jurisprudence of the ad hoc Tribunals, and also presents an empirical analysis of influential factors and other data from ICTY and ICTR sentencing practice, thus offering quantitative support for the doctrinal analysis. This publication is one of the first to be entirely devoted to the process of sentencing in international criminal justice. The book will thus be of great interest to practitioners, academics and students of the subject.

From Nuremberg to The Hague

The Future of International Criminal Justice
Author: Philippe Sands
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521536769
Category: History
Page: 192
View: 5006

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A 2003 collection of lectures examining the evolution of international criminal justice from World War II to date.

The International Criminal Court

Global Politics and the Quest for Justice
Author: William Driscoll,Joseph P. Zompetti,Suzette Zompetti
Publisher: IDEA
ISBN: 9780972054140
Category: Education
Page: 285
View: 5628

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Annotation The Nuremberg Trials at the end of World War II established the principle that individual leaders could be held responsible for "crimes against humanity." Although various ad hoc tribunals were held in the last half of the 20th century, it was not until 2002 that a permanent international court was established, under the auspices, of the United Nations. The international Criminal Court has been controversial with many key nations most notably, the United States refusing to ratify the treaty establishing the court. Some critics object to the adoption of a judicial system that seems to supersede national judicial systems; others fear that the court will be used to pursue narrow political ends. This book will comprise three sections: the first will examine the history of the creation of the court; the second will contain articles that outline objections to the court; the third will contain articles defending and promoting the court. The authors include primary sources on both sides of the controversy, with special attention to America's involvement. A glossary of key terms, and the text of the Rome Statute establishing the court will also be included.

Appeal and Sentence in International Criminal Law


Author: Jan Philipp Book
Publisher: BWV Verlag
ISBN: 3830527160
Category: Electronic books
Page: 324
View: 2069

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HauptbeschreibungThe International Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda hold far-reaching sentencing powers. At the same time, consistency and fairness in sentencing are of utmost important to the practice of the Tribunals. Accordingly, the sentencing powers of the Tribunals demand for a system of control. One crucial procedural safeguard to facilitate such control is the scrutiny exercised by the Appeals Chamber. This study analyses both sentencing and appellate law in the International Tribunals. Its fundamental objective is to ensure consistency in punishment by means of appellate review.The study analyses the substantive guidelines for the sentencing decision and describes how these have evolved in the practice of the Tribunals. It then explores the nature and scope of the appeal. In doing so it examines the most important procedural devices and instruments and assesses their practical importance to the appellate process. Finally, it analyses the importance the respective practice of the Tribunals will hold for the future practice of the International Criminal Court.

The International Criminal Court

An Introduction
Author: Andrew Novak
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319158325
Category: Social Science
Page: 116
View: 6638

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This book is about the International Criminal Court (ICC), a new and highly distinctive criminal justice institution with the ability to prosecute the highest-level government officials, including heads of state, even in countries that have not accepted its jurisdiction. The book explores the historical development of international criminal law and the formal legal structure created by the Rome Statute, against the background of the Court’s search for objectivity in a political global environment. The book reviews the operations of the Court in practice and the Court’s position in the power politics of the international system. It discusses and clarifies all stages of an international criminal proceeding from the opening of the investigation to sentencing, reparations, and final appeals in the context of its restorative justice mission. Making appropriate comparisons and contrasts between the international criminal justice system and domestic and national systems, the book fills a gap in international criminal justice study.

An Introduction to the International Criminal Court


Author: William A. Schabas
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 131688323X
Category: Law
Page: N.A
View: 8227

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The International Criminal Court ushered in a new era in the protection of human rights. The Court prosecutes genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression when national justice systems are either unwilling or unable to do so themselves. This fifth edition of the seminal text describes a Court which is no longer in its infancy; the Court is currently examining situations that involve more than twenty countries in every continent of the planet. This book considers the difficulties in the Court's troubled relationship with Africa, the vagaries of the position of the United States, and the challenges the Court may face as it confronts conflicts around the world. It also reviews the history of international criminal prosecution and the Rome Statute. Written by a leading commentator, it is an authoritative and up-to-date introduction to the legal issues involved in the creation and operation of the Court.

Beyond Victor's Justice? The Tokyo War Crimes Trial Revisited


Author: Yuki Tanaka,Timothy L.H. McCormack,Gerry Simpson
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004215913
Category: Political Science
Page: 436
View: 4861

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The aim of this new collection of essays is to engage in analysis beyond the familiar victor’s justice critiques. The editors have drawn on authors from across the world — including Australia, Japan, China, France, Korea, New Zealand and the United Kingdom — with expertise in the fields of international humanitarian law, international criminal law, Japanese studies, modern Japanese history, and the use of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. The diverse backgrounds of the individual authors allow the editors to present essays which provide detailed and original analyses of the Tokyo Trial from legal, philosophical and historical perspectives.

Double Standards: International Criminal Law and the West


Author: Wolfgang Kaleck
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9788293081678
Category: Law
Page: 150
View: 6696

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In this book, Wolfgang Kaleck, an internationally active human rights and criminal lawyer, assesses the practice of international criminal law to date and analyses one of its main weaknesses: International criminal justice purports to be universal, but in reality it often operates in a politically selective manner. Until now, hardly any of those most responsible for international crimes committed by Western states have faced trial. Against the backdrop of this criticism, the book advocates a truly universal practice of international criminal law which holds even the most powerful accountable for crimes they have committed. Kaleck also tells the stories of survivors of human rights violations and human rights organizations that struggle for universal accountability for international crimes. He argues that the proponents of universal criminal justice must actively address existing double standards, as "it will not be possible to speak of a universal criminal justice system with equal rights and access to justice for all until the instigators and organizers of Guantanamo and of the atrocities in Chechnya are held accountable for their actions.""

The Fundamental Concept of Crime in International Criminal Law

A Comparative Law Analysis
Author: Iryna Marchuk
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3642282466
Category: Law
Page: 304
View: 7304

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This book examines the rapid development of the fundamental concept of a crime in international criminal law from a comparative law perspective. In this context, particular thought has been given to the catalyzing impact of the criminal law theory that has developed in major world legal systems upon the crystallization of the substantive part of international criminal law. This study offers a critical overview of international and domestic jurisprudence with regard to the construal of the concept of a crime (actus reus, mens rea, defences, modes of liability) and exposes roots of confusion in international criminal law through a comprehensive comparative analysis of substantive criminal laws in selected legal jurisdictions.

The Dynamics of International Criminal Justice

Essays In Honour Of Sir Richard May
Author: Hirad Abtahi,Gideon Boas,Richard May (LL. B.)
Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers
ISBN: 9004145877
Category: Law
Page: 314
View: 468

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This book is dedicated to the memory of Sir Richard May, who passed away on 1 July 2004, and to the rich legacy he has left behind in the area of international criminal law. It contains in-depth analyses of a range of issues critical to the development and understanding of international criminal law, written by contributors who worked in some way with Sir Richard during his tenure at the ICTY, particularly during his last years as Presiding Judge of the Milosevi? Trial. It contains a Foreword by the President of the ICTY, Theodor Meron, and substantive work in three main parts: one chapter concerning the development and understanding of human rights; five chapters addressing international criminal law issues in the context of ICTY proceedings; and two chapters focusing on substantive aspects of international criminal law. All the chapters analyse international criminal law as applied by the ICTY, as well as the ICC, ICTR and other international or hybrid criminal tribunals, and are all authored by persons in a position to give great insight into the subject matter discussed.

Commentary on the Law of the International Criminal Court


Author: Mark Klamberg
Publisher: Torkel Opsahl Academic Epublisher
ISBN: 9788283481006
Category: Law
Page: 775
View: 5951

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This book provides legal commentary on every article of the Statute of the International Criminal Court. The text is written by 45 experts from 18 countries. Case law and other sources relevant to the interpretation of the Statute are discussed and referenced.

An Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure


Author: Robert Cryer,Hakan Friman,Darryl Robinson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521135818
Category: Law
Page: 618
View: 3803

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This market-leading textbook gives an authoritative account of international criminal law, and the investigation and prosecution of crime, and guides the reader through controversies with an accessible and sophisticated approach. Now covers developments in the ICC, victims' rights, alternatives to international criminal justice, and has extended coverage of terrorism.

The UN International Criminal Tribunals

The Former Yugoslavia, Rwanda and Sierra Leone
Author: William A. Schabas
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139456814
Category: Political Science
Page: 711
View: 9573

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This book is a guide to the law that applies in the three international criminal tribunals, for the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda and Sierra Leone, set up by the UN during the period 1993 to 2002 to deal with atrocities and human rights abuses committed during conflict in those countries. Building on the work of an earlier generation of war crimes courts, these tribunals have developed a sophisticated body of law concerning the elements of the three international crimes (genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes), and forms of participation in such crimes, as well as other general principles of international criminal law, procedural matters and sentencing. The legacy of the tribunals will be indispensable as international law moves into a more advanced stage, with the establishment of the International Criminal Court. Their judicial decisions are examined here, as well as the drafting history of their statutes and other contemporary sources.

A Draft International Criminal Code and Draft Statute for an International Criminal Tribunal


Author: M. Cherif Bassiouni
Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers
ISBN: 9780898389180
Category: Law
Page: 492
View: 9241

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Text no. 1: The variety of topics covered & the quality of the contributors make these two volumes a necessary part of any law library in the world. The essays are designed to overlap in the well-tested & established fields & branches of law dealing with contemporary issues which lawyers, diplomats, political scientists, politicians & research scholars are familiar with. The essays fully demonstrate the depth of knowledge of the eminent professors & specialists who have written them. The two volumes of essays are divided into seven parts. Volume One, entitled Contemporary International Law & Human Rights , focuses essentially on subjects relating to International Law & is divided into three sections. Part one of the first volume encompasses Topics in International Law such as Some New Thoughts on the Codification of International Law by his Excellency Judge Roberto Ago; Evidence in the Procedure of the International Court of Justice: The Role of the Court by His Excellency Judge Manfred Lachs; The Validity of International Law: an Empirical Experiment by Professor Georg Schwarzenberger, with a particularly engaging & incisive Introduction to the two volumes of Essays by Professor Ian Brownlie, Q.C. Human rights subjects still hold pride of place in the thinking of many legal experts & scholars & that is clearly reflected here. The title of the second volume is African Law & Comparative Public Law. Part Five of the essays contains topics of interest in the African Legal system which has its roots in the British Common Law System. Constitutional Law is broadly covered in part six which forms a section of its own in Volume Two. Text no. 2: This Festschrift pays tribute to Judge Taslim Olawale Elias, the leading African exponent of International Law to date. The two volumes of essays are divided into seven parts. The first volume focuses essentially on subjects relating to International Law & is divided into three sections. Part one of the first volume encompasses Topics in International Law such as Some New Thoughts on the Codification of International Law by His Excellency Judge Roberto Ago; Evidence in the Procedure of the International Court of Justice: The Role of the Court by His Excellency Jugde Manfred Lachs; The Validity of International Law: an Empirical Experiment by Professor Georg Schwarzenberger, with a particularly engaging & incisive Introduction to the two volumes of Essays by Professor Ian Brownlie, Q.C. Human Rights subjects still hold the pride of place in the thinking of many legal experts & scholars which is clearly reflected here. The title of the second volume is African Law & Comparative Public Law. Part five of the essays contains topics of interest in African Legal system which took its roots from the British Common Law System. Constitutional Law is bloadly covered in part six which forms a section of its own in volume two. Quite apart from the variety of topics covered in this festschrift, the quality of the contributors to it, makes the whole exercise a necessary part of an important collection of any law library in the world. The framework of the essays suggest that they are designed to overlap in the well-tested & established field of law & those branches of law dealing with contemporary issues which lawyers, diplomats, political scientists, politicians & research scholars are familiar with. The richness of the festschrift is matched only by the mutually reinforcing manner in which the presentation was made. The essays fully demonstrate the depth of knowledge of the eminent professors & specialists wh

Introduction to International Criminal Law, 2nd Revised Edition


Author: M. Cherif Bassiouni
Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers
ISBN: 9004231692
Category: Law
Page: 1260
View: 9455

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Written by one of the world's pioneers and leading authorities on international criminal law, this text book covers the history, nature, and sources of international criminal law; the ratione personae; ratione materiae--sources of substantive international criminal law; the indirect enforcement system; the direct enforcement system; the function of the international criminal court; rules of procedure and evidence applicable to international criminal proceedings; and the future of international criminal law. This textbook is fully updated, comprehensive, easy to read, and ideally suited for classroom use.

Crime and Global Justice

The Dynamics of International Punishment
Author: Daniele Archibugi,Alice Pease
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1509512659
Category: Law
Page: 288
View: 9067

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Over the last quarter of a century a new system of global criminal justice has emerged. But how successful has it been? Are we witnessing a new era of cosmopolitan justice or are the old principles of victors’ justice still in play? In this book, Daniele Archibugi and Alice Pease offer a vibrant and thoughtful analysis of the successes and shortcomings of the global justice system from 1945 to the present day. Part I traces the evolution of this system and the cosmopolitan vision enshrined within it. Part II looks at how it has worked in practice, focusing on the trials of some of the world’s most notorious war criminals, including Augusto Pinochet, Slobodan Milošević, Radovan Karad ić, Saddam Hussein and Omar al-Bashir, to assess the efficacy of the new dynamics of international punishment and the extent to which they can operate independently, without the interference of powerful governments and their representatives. Looking to the future, Part III asks how the system’s failings can be addressed. What actions are required for cosmopolitan values to become increasingly embedded in the global justice system in years to come?