Scottish Ethnicity and the Making of New Zealand Society, 1850-1930


Author: Tanja Bueltmann
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748688773
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 2595

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This book makes an original contribution to the growing body of knowledge on the Scots abroad, presenting a coherent and comprehensive account of the Scottish immigrant experience in New Zealand.

Empire, Migration and Identity in the British World


Author: Kent Fedorowich,Andrew S. Thompson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0719089565
Category: History
Page: 275
View: 7960

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This volume brings together established scholars with a new generation of migration and transnational historians. Their work weaves together the 'new' imperial and the 'new' migration histories, and explores the interplay of migration within and between the local, regional, imperial, and transnational arenas.

At the Margin of Empire

John Webster and Hokianga, 1841–1900
Author: Jennifer Ashton
Publisher: Auckland University Press
ISBN: 1775587797
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 276
View: 9368

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In telling the story of John Webster's long and colorful life for the first time, this biography also explores the wider transformation of relationships between Maori and Pakeha during the 19th century. In this remarkable biography, Jennifer Ashton uses the life of one man as a unique lens through which to view the early history of New Zealand.

Scots in Victorian and Edwardian Belfast

A Study in Elite Migration
Author: Kyle Hughes
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748679936
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 7686

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A new departure in Scottish and Irish migration studiesThe Scottish diasporic communities closest to home-those which are part of what we sometimes term the 'near Diaspora'-are those we know least about. Whilst an interest in the overseas Scottish diaspora has grown in recent years, Scots who chose to settle in other parts of the United Kingdom have been largely neglected. This book addresses this imbalance.Scots travelled freely around the industrial centres of northern Britain throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and Belfast was one of the most important ports of call for thousands of Scots. The Scots played key roles in shaping Belfast society in the modern period: they were essential to its industrial development; they were at the centre of many cultural, philanthropic and religious initiatives and were welcomed by the host community accordingly.Yet despite their obvious significance, in staunchly Protestant, Unionist, and at times insular and ill at ease Belfast, individual Scots could be viewed with suspicion by their hosts, dismissed as 'strangers' and cast in the role of interfering outsiders.Key FeaturesThe only book-length scholarly study of the Scots in modern Ireland.Brings to light the fundamental importance of Scottish migration to Belfast society during the nineteenth century.Advances our knowledge and understanding of Scotland's 'near diaspora.'Highlights areas of tension in Ulster-Scottish relations during the Home Rule era.Puts forward a new agenda for a better understanding of British in-migration to Ireland in the modern period.

Locating the English Diaspora, 1500-2010


Author: Tanja Bueltmann,David T. Gleeson,Donald M. MacRaild
Publisher: Liverpool University Press
ISBN: 184631819X
Category: History
Page: 246
View: 3347

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After 1600, English emigration became one of Europe’s most significant population movements. Yet compared to what has been written about the migration of Scots and Irish, relatively little energy has been expended on the numerically more significant English flows. Whilst the Scottish, Irish, German, Italian, Jewish and Black Diasporas are well known and much studied, there is virtual silence on the English. Why, then, is there no English Diaspora? Why has little been said about the English other than to map their main emigration flows? Did the English simply disappear into the host population? Or were they so fundamental, and foundational, to the Anglophone, Protestant cultures of the evolving British World that they could not be distinguished in the way Catholic Irish or continental Europeans were? With contributions from the UK, Europe North America and Australasia that examine themes as wide-ranging as Yorkshire societies in New Zealand and St George’s societies in Montreal, to Anglo-Saxonism in the Atlantic World and the English Diaspora of the sixteenth century, this international collection explores these and related key issues about the nature and character of English identity during the creation of the cultures of the wider British World. It does not do so uncritically. Several of the authors deal with and accept the invisibility of the English, while others take the opposite view. The result is a lively collection which combines reaffirmations of some existing ideas with fresh empirical research, and groundbreaking new conceptualisations.

Of Laws of Ships and Shipmen'


Author: Edda Frankot
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 074866808X
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 6654

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This volume is an important addition to the history of Scotland and European law, utilising innovative research and methodologies to highlight Scotland's position in medieval Europe as a sophisticated legal player. It places Scotland in a wider historical

Ourselves and Others


Author: Graeme Morton
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748655182
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 3460

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Graeme Morton shows that identity, like industry, is a key element in explaining the period 1832-1914. Ourselves and Others is about 'us and them', the dialectic of national identity formation.

Clubbing Together

Ethnicity, Civility and Formal Sociability in the Scottish Diaspora to 1930
Author: Tanja Bueltmann
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1781387435
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 2991

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Emigrants carried a rich array of associations with them to the new worlds in which they settled, often 'clubbing together' along ethnic lines shortly after first foot fall. Yet while a crucial element of immigrant community life, one of the richest examples, that of Scottish migrants, has received only patchy coverage. Moreover, no one has yet problematized Scottish associations, such as St Andrew's societies or Burns clubs, as a series of transnational connections that were deeply rooted in the civic life of their respective communities. This book provides the first global study to capture the wider relevance of the Scots' associationalism, arguing that associations and formal sociability are a key to explaining how migrants negotiated their ethnicity in the diaspora and connected to social structures in diverse settlements. Moving beyond the traditional nineteenth-century settler dominions, the book offers a unique comparative focus, bringing together Scotland's near diaspora in England and Ireland with that in North America, Africa, and Australasia to assess the evolution of Scottish ethnic associations, as well as their diverse roles as sites of memory and expressions of civility. The book reveals that the structures offered by Scottish associations engaged directly with the local, New World contexts, developing distinct characteristics that cannot be subsumed under one simplistic label - that of an overseas 'national society'. The book promotes understanding not only of Scottish ethnicity overseas, but also of how different types of ethnic associational activism made diaspora tangible.

Gender and Enlightenment Culture in Eighteenth-Century Scotland


Author: Rosalind Carr
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748646434
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 8894

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Presents major new research on gender in the Scottish EnlightenmentWhat role did gender play in the Scottish Enlightenment? Combining intellectual and cultural history, this book explores how men and women experienced the Scottish Enlightenment. It examines Scotland in a European context, investigating ideologies of gender and cultural practices among the urban elites of Scotland in the 18th century.The book provides an in-depth analysis of men's construction and performance of masculinity in intellectual clubs, taverns and through the violent ritual of the duel. Women are important actors in this story, and the book presents an analysis of women's contribution to Scottish Enlightenment culture, and it asks why there were no Scottish bluestockings.

Scottish Diaspora


Author: Tanja Bueltmann
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748650628
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 5311

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This introductory history of the Scottish diaspora (c.1700 to 1945) explores migration, Scots' experiences where they landed and the reverse impact of this migration on Scotland. It examines the geographies of the diaspora and key theories, concepts and t

British Civilization

An Introduction
Author: John Oakland
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317351681
Category: History
Page: 390
View: 8230

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The eighth edition of this highly-praised textbook has been substantially updated and revised to provide students of British studies with the perfect introduction to Britain, its country and people, politics and government, education, economy, media, arts and religion. It includes: discussion of recent developments and areas of topical interest in British society such as immigration, the recession, devolution and the Scottish Referendum and Britain’s relationships with the US and the EU coverage of the 2015 general election and its implications for the future new full-colour illustrations exercises and questions to stimulate class discussion insights into the attitudes of British people today towards important issues updated suggestions for further reading and useful websites. Supported by a fully updated companion website (found at www.routledge.com/cw/oakland) featuring further exercises, quiz questions, an interactive timeline, links to relevant articles and videos online and tutor guidance, British Civilization is a vital introduction to the crucial and complex identities of Britain past and present.

Beyond the Free Market

Rebuilding a Just Society in New Zealand
Author: David Cooke,Claire Hill,Pat Baskett,Ruth Irwin,Edmund Thomas
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781927212189
Category: Distributive justice
Page: 184
View: 5600

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Unsettling Settler Societies

Articulations of Gender, Race, Ethnicity and Class
Author: Daiva Stasiulis,Nira Yuval-Davis
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9780803986947
Category: Social Science
Page: 335
View: 7694

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`Settler societies' are those in which Europeans have settled and become politically dominant over indigenous people, and where a heterogenous society has developed in class, ethnic and racial terms. They offer a unique prism for understanding the complex relations of gender, race, ethnicity and class in contemporary societies. Unsettling Settler Societies brings together a distinguished cast of contributors to explore these relations in both material and discursive terms. They look at the relation between indigenous and settler//immigrant populations, focusing in particular on women's conditions and politics. The book examines how the process of development of settler societies, and the positions of indigenous and

Sutherland Estate, 1850-1920: Aristocratic Decline, Estate Management and Land Reform

Aristocratic Decline, Estate Management and Land Reform
Author: Annie Tindley
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748642676
Category: History
Page: 200
View: 5460

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From the mid-nineteenth century until the end of World War I, the Sutherland Estate was the largest landed estate in western Europe; at 1.1 million acres, the ducal family owned almost the entire county of Sutherland as well as a further 30,000 acres in England. The estate was owned by the dukes of Sutherland, who were among the richest patrician landowners of the period; from the early nineteenth century, however, the family were shadowed by their reputation as great clearance landlords, something that would come back to haunt them throughout the coming decades

Understanding Scotland

The Sociology of a Nation
Author: David McCrone
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134529597
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 1799

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First published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Scotland and the French Revolutionary War, 1792-1802


Author: Atle Wold
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 1474406688
Category: History
Page: 248
View: 9445

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For the British government's supporters in Scotland in the 1790s, one thing was paramount: they were fighting French principles in any shape or form they might take. Whether this meant defeating the influence of French revolutionary ideas in Scotland, or defeating the military menace of the French republic, they were determined to stand firm in their support of the British state.This book charts the Scottish contribution to, both the war effort of the 1790s, and the British governments struggles to defeat political radicalism at home; lasting from the first outbreak of political disturbances in Scotland in 1792, until the French revolutionary war came to an end in 1802. In this, the Scots made their very distinct mark in terms of recruitment for armed service, demonstrations of loyalty, and prosecutions against political radicals in the law courts but, perhaps less so, in terms of their financial contributions . The government of Scotland was further integrated into the British state in a structural sense over the course of the decade, yet retained many distinctly Scottish features none the less and on the whole the 1790s comes across as a time when the Scots found little difficulty in seeing themselves as both British and Scottish.

Famine in Scotland - the 'Ill Years' of the 1690s


Author: Karen Cullen
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 074864184X
Category: Social Science
Page: 232
View: 3027

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This book examines the climatic and economic origins of the last national famine to occur in Scotland, the nature and extent of the crisis which ensued, and what the impact of the famine was upon the population in demographic, economic and social terms. Current published knowledge about the causes, extent, and impact of the famine in Scotland is limited and many conclusions have been speculative in the absence of extensive research. Despite the critical importance of this crisis, one of the four disasters of the 1690s, which are widely acknowledged to have contributed to the economic arguments in favour of the Union of the Parliaments in 1707, the topic has been largely neglected and even underplayed by historians. This is the first full study of the famine, providing a unique scholarly examination of the causes, course, characteristics and consequences of the crisis. A comprehensive study of agricultural, climatic, economic, social and demographic issues, the book seeks to establish answers to the fundamental question concerning the event. How serious was it? Using detailed statistical and qualitative analysis, it discusses the regional factors that defined the famine, the impact on the population, and the interconnected causes of this traumatic event.

The English Diaspora in North America

Migration, Ethnicity and Association, 1730s-1950s
Author: Tanja Bueltmann,Donald M. MacRaild
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1526103710
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 8640

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Ethnic associations once were vibrant features of societies, such as the United States and Canada, which attracted large numbers of immigrants. While the transplanted cultural lives of the Irish, Scots, and Europeans have received much attention, the English are far less widely explored. It isassumed the English were not an ethnic community; that they lacked the alienating experiences associated with immigration and thus possessed few elements of diasporas. This deeply researched new book questions this assumption. Instead it shows that English associations once were widespread, takinghold in colonial America, spreading to Canada and then encompassing all of the empire. Celebrating saints days, expressing pride in the monarch and national heroes, providing charity to the national poor, and forging mutual aid societies mutual, were all features of English life overseas. In fact,the English simply resembled other immigrant groups too much to be dismissed as the unproblematic, invisible immigrants.

Ownership and Appropriation


Author: Veronica Strang,Mark Busse
Publisher: Berg
ISBN: 1847888402
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 5347

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Through detailed case studies covering a wide range of related issues, Ownership and Appropriation provides a new approach to this key anthropological topic.