Scottish Emigration to Colonial America, 1607-1785


Author: David Dobson
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820340782
Category: History
Page: 280
View: 1902

Continue Reading →

Before 1650, only a few hundred Scots had trickled into the American colonies, but by the early 1770s the number had risen to 10,000 per year. A conservative estimate of the total number of Scots who settled in North America prior to 1785 is around 150,000. Who were these Scots? What did they do? Where did they settle? What factors motivated their emigration? Dobson's work, based on original research on both sides of the Atlantic, comprehensively identifies the Scottish contribution to the settlement of North America prior to 1785, with particular emphasis on the seventeenth century.

Scottish Emigration to Colonial America, 1607-1785


Author: David Dobson
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820326436
Category: History
Page: 266
View: 9046

Continue Reading →

Before 1650, only a few hundred Scots had trickled into the American colonies, but by the early 1770s the number had risen to 10,000 per year. A conservative estimate of the total number of Scots who settled in North America prior to 1785 is around 150,000. Who were these Scots? What did they do? Where did they settle? What factors motivated their emigration? Dobson's work, based on original research on both sides of the Atlantic, comprehensively identifies the Scottish contribution to the settlement of North America prior to 1785, with particular emphasis on the seventeenth century.

Scottish Emigration to Colonial America, 1607-1785


Author: David Dobson
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820314921
Category: History
Page: 266
View: 8148

Continue Reading →

This study presents all known information about the Scottish emigrants who helped settle the vast British colonial expanse that once reached from Newfoundland down the eastern seaboard to the West Indies. Ranging in his coverage from the founding of the Jamestown Colony through the first years of American independence, David Dobson substantiates the omnipresence of Scots throughout the region and rescues from obscurity their accomplishments in virtually all trades and professions. The book is arranged by geographic location within a chronology that frames the major periods of Scottish emigration, which were, by definition, periods of great sociopolitical change in Britain: the half-century before Restoration, Restoration to Union, Union to the Peace of Paris, and the Peace of Paris to the Treaty of Paris. Dobson's narrative not only incorporates a great deal of demographic and biographical information, but also uses anecdotes that typify the Scottish emigrant experience. As he considers the motivations of the emigrants, their settlement patterns, and their contributions to colonial life, Dobson addresses an abundance of related topics, from the Scottish influence on such schools as Princeton and the College of William and Mary to the complicated loyalties of the Scottish factions in the American Revolution. Of the estimated 150,000 Scots who emigrated to America before 1785, says Dobson, a fair number came involuntarily or reluctantly. As defeated insurrectionists they were forced into indentured servitude; as convicted criminals they were banished to labor on Caribbean sugar and cotton plantations; as mercenaries or conscripts they came to fight the Mohawks and the French, and later the rebellious subjects of George III. As Presbyterians and Quakers many others came in search of tolerance. Enterprising Scots who had long been victims of English trade restrictions also felt the lure of the colonies. Turning away from the nearby commercial and cultural havens they had established in Poland, the Netherlands, and elsewhere, Scottish manufacturers and crafts persons poured across the Atlantic. Lowland Scots, Dobson shows, were predominant until the 1730s, tending to cluster in seaport communities and the West Indies. The clannish Highlanders who followed came at first to escape English animosity but were later driven to emigrate by poor harvests and harsh winters. They trekked to the southern frontiers of Georgia and the Carolinas, the rugged interior of New York, and the farthest Canadian outposts of the Hudson Bay Company. The contributions of these people, in fields from education and politics to religion and medicine, were greatly out of proportion to their numbers. David Dobson's book, based almost entirely on primary research in archives and libraries in Scotland, England, Canada, and the United States, will gain Scottish emigrants the recognition they deserve.

The Original Scots Colonists of Early America

Supplement, 1607-1707
Author: David Dobson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Reference
Page: 185
View: 7612

Continue Reading →

A compilation of all extant records pertaining to the original Scottish emigrants to the American colonies. Over 7,100 people listed of the approximately 150,000 Scots who emigrated to America before the Revolutionary War.

The Highland Scots of North Carolina, 1732-1776


Author: Duane Meyer
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469620626
Category: History
Page: 230
View: 6886

Continue Reading →

Meyer addresses himself principally to two questions. Why did many thousands of Scottish Highlanders emigrate to America in the eighteenth century, and why did the majority of them rally to the defense of the Crown. . . . Offers the most complete and intelligent analysis of them that has so far appeared.--William and Mary Quarterly Using a variety of original sources -- official papers, travel documents, diaries, and newspapers -- Duane Meyer presents an impressively complete reconstruction of the settlement of the Highlanders in North Carolina. He examines their motives for migration, their life in America, and their curious political allegiance to George III.

A Compilation of the Original Lists of Protestant Immigrants to South Carolina, 1763-1773


Author: Janie Revill
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806305991
Category: Reference
Page: 163
View: 2002

Continue Reading →

"The 4,000 immigrants listed in this volume were Protestant refugees from Europe who came to South Carolina on the encouragement of an act passed by the General Assembly of the Colony on July 25, 1761, called the Bounty Act. Arranged chronologically, and taken verbatim from the original Council Journals, 1763-1773, the information given in the certificates and petitions for lands under the Bounty Act includes the date and the location and acres granted. In some cases the immigrants are listed with their age, country of origin, and name of the vessel on which they arrived. An excellent index provides references to more than 4,000 names in the text. This book is indispensable in attempting to locate an ancestor's place of settlement in South Carolina." -- Publisher website (December 2008).

Colonists from Scotland

Emigration to North America, 1707-1783
Author: Ian C. Graham,Ian Charles Cargill Graham
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 9780806345178
Category: Reference
Page: 224
View: 6154

Continue Reading →

This distinguished monograph is a treatise on the causes and character of Scottish emigration to North America prior to the American Revolution. Entire chapters are then devoted to Lowland and Highland emigration, forced transportation of felons and the drafting of Scottish troops to the colonies, rising rents and other factors in the Scottish social structure, and the British government's role in colonization. Three concluding chapters cover the geographical centers of Scottish settlement--especially the Carolinas.

Carolina Scots

An Historical and Genealogical Study of Over 100 Years of Emigration
Author: Douglas F. Kelly,Caroline Switzer Kelly
Publisher: Seventeen Thirty Nine Publications
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 485
View: 5879

Continue Reading →

"Part I stands on its own as an historical study of early emigrations following the lead of the Argyll Colony in 1739 ... Part II provides a comprehensive listing of names and locations of Scottish North and South Carolina families beginning in 1739 and continuing with the descendents down to three, four or five generations for nearly a century."--Front flap of jacket.

Scots-Irish Links, 1575-1725


Author: David Dobson
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806353511
Category: Reference
Page: 132
View: 8283

Continue Reading →

This is the fifth volume (sixth part) in a series compiled by Mr. Dobson to identify the Lowland Scots who migrated to Ulster between 1575 and 1725.

A History of Clan Shaw


Author: Charles John Shaw
Publisher: A History of S
ISBN: N.A
Category: Clans
Page: 400
View: 9064

Continue Reading →

The Shaw family of Scotland between the 1200s and the present, including branches in Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and elsewhere.

Scotch-Irish Migration to South Carolina, 1772

Rev. William Martin and His Five Shiploads of Settlers
Author: Jean Stephenson,John Stephenson
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806348321
Category: Reference
Page: 137
View: 7801

Continue Reading →

Wayland's sketches of Rockingham County natives and other persons who had become identified with the county or the City of Harrisonburg reflect a wide variety of occupations, achievements and interests inasmuch as they include farmers, businessmen, educators, preachers, doctors, nurses, lawyers, jurists, statesmen, soldiers, writers, and so on. Part I, the larger of the two components of the volume, consists of extended biographical sketches, with accompanying portraits, of Wayland's contemporaries. The subjects' careers and civic interests are covered in some detail, as is each individual's date and place of birth--and sometimes death-- and the names and dates associated with the subject's marriages and children. Part II features shorter, un-illustrated essays of a few hundred Rockingham County luminaries of bygone years, any number of whose lines are extended back to the 1700s.

Scotland, The Caribbean and the Atlantic World, 1750-1820


Author: Douglas Hamilton
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 9780719071829
Category: History
Page: 249
View: 8399

Continue Reading →

This is the first book wholly devoted to assessing the array of links between Scotland and the Caribbean in the later eighteenth century. It uses a wide range of archival sources to paint a detailed picture of the lives of thousands of Scots who sought fortunes and opportunities, as Burns wrote, "across th' Atlantic roar". It outlines the range of their occupations as planters, merchants, slave owners, doctors, overseers, and politicians, and shows how Caribbean connections affected Scottish society during the period of "improvement".