Scottish emigration and Scottish society

proceedings of the Scottish Historical Studies Seminar, University of Strathclyde 1990-1991
Author: Thomas Martin Devine
Publisher: John Donald
ISBN: N.A
Category: Civilization, Modern
Page: 178
View: 9661

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Exploring the Scottish Past

Themes in the History of Scottish Society
Author: Thomas Martin Devine
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 9781898410386
Category: Scot
Page: 260
View: 4136

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This is a collection of fifteen essays written over the last twenty years by one of Scotland's most eminent historians. The material concentrates on four broad themes in seventeenth-, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Scottish history: Merchants, Unions and Trade; Scottish Economic Development; The Highlands; and the Rural Lowlands.

Scottish Emigration to Colonial America, 1607-1785


Author: David Dobson
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820340782
Category: History
Page: 280
View: 8985

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Before 1650, only a few hundred Scots had trickled into the American colonies, but by the early 1770s the number had risen to 10,000 per year. A conservative estimate of the total number of Scots who settled in North America prior to 1785 is around 150,000. Who were these Scots? What did they do? Where did they settle? What factors motivated their emigration? Dobson's work, based on original research on both sides of the Atlantic, comprehensively identifies the Scottish contribution to the settlement of North America prior to 1785, with particular emphasis on the seventeenth century.

The Scottish Pioneers of Upper Canada, 1784-1855

Glengarry and Beyond
Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 9781897045015
Category: History
Page: 376
View: 4238

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Scots, some of Upper Canadas earliest pioneers, influenced its early development. This book charts the progress of Scottish settlement throughout the province.

Scottish Migration Since 1750

Reasons and Results
Author: James C. Docherty
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 0761867953
Category: Social Science
Page: 204
View: 5154

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This work explains Scotland’s population and migration history using new methods and unpublished sources. It surveys migration to England, Canada, United States, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand to 1990.

Scottish Ethnicity and the Making of New Zealand Society, 1850-1930


Author: Tanja Bueltmann
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748688773
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 492

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This book makes an original contribution to the growing body of knowledge on the Scots abroad, presenting a coherent and comprehensive account of the Scottish immigrant experience in New Zealand.

Scottish Society, 1500-1800


Author: Robert Allen Houston,Ian D. Whyte
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521891677
Category: History
Page: 312
View: 9834

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The volume covers many of the most significant themes in pre-industrial Scottish society.

Scots in the USA and Canada, 1825-1875


Author: David Dobson
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806351780
Category: Reference
Page: 122
View: 2465

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Nineteenth-century emigration from Scotland to the United States was a continuation of a process that had its roots in the seventeenth century. Unlike the majority of European emigrants, who represented surplus rural workers from an agrarian society, the Scottish emigrants of the Victorian period were skilled educated workers from urban industrial backgrounds whose expertise was in great demand in the rapidly industrializing cities of North America. While the total number of Scots emigrating is difficult to estimate with accuracy, as Irish and Continental emigrants often sailed from Scottish ports, it is likely that over 100,000 emigrants traveled to North America between 1825 and 1880 from Scottish ports. The volume at hand represents the third in a series by Mr. Dobson to list Scottish emigrants of this era (see Part One, Part Two, Part Four, and Part Five of the series). In the absence of official passenger records, this volume is compiled overwhelmingly from Scottish newspapers such as the Edinburgh Evening Courant and the Perthshire Courier, and from the Register of Sasines, Register of Deeds, and other original documents in the National Archives of Scotland. In all, Mr. Dobson names an additional 1,500 Scottish emigrants not mentioned in the earlier volumes, with such identifying characteristics as place of residence, date, and source, and sometimes names and residence of family members and the name of the sailing vessel.

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Scottish History


Author: T. M. Devine,Jenny Wormald
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191624330
Category: History
Page: 720
View: 5122

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Over the last three decades major advances in research and scholarship have transformed understanding of the Scottish past. In this landmark study some of the most eminent writers on the subject, together with emerging new talents, have combined to produce a large-scale volume which reconsiders in fresh and illuminating ways the classic themes of the nation's history since the sixteenth century as well as a number of new topics which are only now receiving detailed attention. Such major themes as the Reformation, the Union of 1707, the Scottish Enlightenment, clearances, industrialisation, empire, emigration, and the Great War are approached from novel and fascinating perspectives, but so too are such issues as the Scottish environment, myth, family, criminality, the literary tradition, and Scotland's contemporary history. All chapters contain expert syntheses of current knowledge, but their authors also stand back and reflect critically on the questions which still remain unanswered, the issues which generate dispute and controversy, and sketch out where appropriate the agenda for future research. The Handbook also places the Scottish experience firmly into an international historical perspective with a considerable focus on the age-old emigration of the Scottish people, the impact of successive waves of immigrants to Scotland, and the nation's key role within the British Empire. The overall result is a vibrant and stimulating review of modern Scottish history: essential reading for students and scholars alike.

Nation and Province in the First British Empire

Scotland and the Americas, 1600-1800
Author: Ned C. Landsman,Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society,John Carter Brown Library
Publisher: Bucknell University Press
ISBN: 9780838754887
Category: History
Page: 292
View: 8496

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For more than four decades, historians have devoted ever-increasing attention to the affinites that linked Scotland with the American colonies in the eighteenth century. This volume moves beyond earlier discussions in two ways. For one, the geographical coverage of the papers extends beyond the territories that became the United States to include what became Canada, The Carribean and even Africa. For another, the volume attends not only those areas in which Scotland was closely linked to the Americas, but also to those where it was not.

A Global Clan

Scottish Migrant Networks and Identities since the Eighteenth Century
Author: Angela McCarthy
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857712950
Category: Social Science
Page: 248
View: 368

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Through a unique approach connecting personal accounts to 'networks' of kin and social groups, ‘A Global Clan’ engages in expanding debates on migration that link imperial history and the European diaspora. Migration from Scotland since the eighteenth century has been a powerful force, influencing the politics, economics, demography, sociology, and culture of many regions across the world. This book uses new material to explore Scottish migrant networks, identities, and personal experiences in areas as diverse as India, New Zealand, and Canada. Assorted migrant voices are presented, from Ellis Island and Australia, the tracts of transients in Asia and the Caribbean, and voluminous correspondence from North America. The overarching approach promises a significant contribution to the historiography that will make it essential reading for scholars of migration and identity.

Scotland No More?

Emigration from Scotland in the Twentieth Century
Author: Marjory Harper
Publisher: Luath Press Ltd
ISBN: 1909912727
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 4081

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Shortlisted for Scottish History Book of the Year at the Saltire Society Literary Awards 2013Scotland No More? taps into the need we all share — to know who we are and where we come from. Scots have always been on the move, and from all quarters we are bombarded with evidence of interest in their historical comings and goings. Earlier eras have been well covered, but until now the story of Scotland's twentieth-century diaspora has remained largely untold.Scotland No More? considers the causes and consequences of the phenomenon, scrutinising the exodus and giving free rein to the voices of those at the heart of the story: the emigrants themselves.

Scots in Victorian and Edwardian Belfast

A Study in Elite Migration
Author: Kyle Hughes
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748679936
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 2074

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A new departure in Scottish and Irish migration studiesThe Scottish diasporic communities closest to home-those which are part of what we sometimes term the 'near Diaspora'-are those we know least about. Whilst an interest in the overseas Scottish diaspora has grown in recent years, Scots who chose to settle in other parts of the United Kingdom have been largely neglected. This book addresses this imbalance.Scots travelled freely around the industrial centres of northern Britain throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and Belfast was one of the most important ports of call for thousands of Scots. The Scots played key roles in shaping Belfast society in the modern period: they were essential to its industrial development; they were at the centre of many cultural, philanthropic and religious initiatives and were welcomed by the host community accordingly.Yet despite their obvious significance, in staunchly Protestant, Unionist, and at times insular and ill at ease Belfast, individual Scots could be viewed with suspicion by their hosts, dismissed as 'strangers' and cast in the role of interfering outsiders.Key FeaturesThe only book-length scholarly study of the Scots in modern Ireland.Brings to light the fundamental importance of Scottish migration to Belfast society during the nineteenth century.Advances our knowledge and understanding of Scotland's 'near diaspora.'Highlights areas of tension in Ulster-Scottish relations during the Home Rule era.Puts forward a new agenda for a better understanding of British in-migration to Ireland in the modern period.

Colonists from Scotland

Emigration to North America, 1707-1783
Author: Ian C. Graham,Ian Charles Cargill Graham
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 9780806345178
Category: Reference
Page: 224
View: 1677

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This distinguished monograph is a treatise on the causes and character of Scottish emigration to North America prior to the American Revolution. Entire chapters are then devoted to Lowland and Highland emigration, forced transportation of felons and the drafting of Scottish troops to the colonies, rising rents and other factors in the Scottish social structure, and the British government's role in colonization. Three concluding chapters cover the geographical centers of Scottish settlement--especially the Carolinas.

Scottish Diaspora


Author: Tanja Bueltmann
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748650628
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 9485

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This introductory history of the Scottish diaspora (c.1700 to 1945) explores migration, Scots' experiences where they landed and the reverse impact of this migration on Scotland. It examines the geographies of the diaspora and key theories, concepts and t

The Sporting Scots of Nineteenth-century Canada


Author: Gerald Redmond
Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
ISBN: 9780838630693
Category: History
Page: 347
View: 3717

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This book examines the role of the Scots in the development of Canadian sport. The evidence from the wide range of primary and secondary sources cited by the author proves that the Scottish contribution was significant.

Scottish Highlanders on the Eve of the Great Migration, 1725-1775

The People of the Northern Isles
Author: David Dobson
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806353791
Category: History
Page: 98
View: 2692

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In 2005 Clearfield Company launched a new series of books by David Dobson that were designed to identify the origins of Scottish Highlanders who traveled to America prior to the Great Highland Migration that began in the 1730s and intensified thereafter. The first four volumes cover Scottish Highlanders from Argyll, Perthshire, Inverness, and the Northern Highlands. This fifth volume in the series pertains to the Northern Isles, commonly known as the Orkney Islands and the Shetland Islands.Much of the Highland emigration was directly related to a breakdown in social and economic institutions. Under the pressures of the commercial and industrial revolutions of the 17th and 18th centuries, Highland chieftains abandoned their patriarchal role in favor of becoming capitalist landlords. By raising farm rents to the breaking point, the chiefs left the social fabric of the Scottish Highlands in tatters. Accordingly, voluntary emigration by Gaelic-speaking Highlanders began in the 1730s. The social breakdown was intensified by the failure of the Jacobite cause in 1745, followed by the British military occupation and repression in the Highlands in the aftermath of the Battle of Culloden. In 1746, the British government dispatched about 1,000 Highland Jacobite prisoners of war to the colonies as indentured servants. Later, during the Seven Years CO War of 1756 Co1763, Highland regiments recruited in the service of the British crown chose to settle in Canada and America rather than return to Scotland.Once in North America, the Highlanders tended to be clannish and moved in extended family groups, unlike immigrants from the Lowlands who moved as individuals or in groups of a few families. The Gaelic-speaking Highlanders tended to settle on the North American frontier, whereas the Lowlanders merged with the English on the coast. Highlanders seem to have established C beachheads, C? and their kin subsequently followed. The best example of this pattern is in North Carolina where they first arrived in 1739 and moved to the Piedmont, to be followed by others for more than a century.Another factor that distinguishes research in Highland genealogy is the availability of pertinent records. Scottish genealogical research is generally based on the parish registers of the Church of Scotland, which provide information on baptisms and marriages. In the Scottish Lowlands, such records can date back to the mid-16th century, but Highland records generally start much later. Americans seeking their Highland roots face the problem that there are few, if any, church records available that pre-date the American Revolution. In the absence of Church of Scotland records, the researcher must turn to a miscellany of other records, such as court records, estate papers, sasines, gravestone inscriptions, burgess rolls, port books, services of heirs, wills and testaments, and especially rent rolls. (Some rent rolls even pre-date parish registers.) This series, therefore, is designed to identify the kinds of records that are available in the absence of parish registers and to supplement the church registers when they are available.The Northern Isles were once isolated on the northwest fringes of Europe; however, as trans-Atlantic trade expanded, they found themselves astride a major sea route between North America and northern Europe. Stromness in the Orkneys became the first or last port of call for many vessels crossing the Atlantic; for example, the vessels of the Hudson Bay Company from the late 17th-century traveled from Stromness to North America. For most Orkney emigrants, the motivating factors were poverty and lack of opportunity. Also noteworthy is that, unlike the other Highlanders, the Northern Islanders were of Scandinavian, not Celtic, origin (with an element of Lowland Scots). While this volume is not a comprehensive directory of all the Orkney and Shetland Islander emigrants during"

Museums, Anthropology and Imperial Exchange


Author: Amiria Henare
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521835916
Category: Art
Page: 323
View: 4124

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Amiria Henare explores the role of material cultural research in anthropology and related disciplines from the late eighteenth century to the present.

Scotland and Nationalism

Scottish Society and Politics, 1707 to the Present
Author: Christopher Harvie
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415195249
Category: History
Page: 292
View: 8187

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First published in 1977, Christopher Harvie's acclaimed study of Scottish culture and politics since the Union of 1707, has been extensively rewritten to bring the story up-to-date and to draw on the remarkable output of Scottish historians and writers in the 1980s. Focusing on poltical nationalism in Scotland, Harvie examines why this nationalism remained apparently in abeyance for two and a half centuries, and why it became so relevant in the second half of the twentieth century. Including a brand new bibliographical index of key personalities and a glossary of nationalist groups, students of Scottish history and of politics will find this a fascinating book.