Scottish emigration and Scottish society

proceedings of the Scottish Historical Studies Seminar, University of Strathclyde 1990-1991
Author: Thomas Martin Devine
Publisher: John Donald
ISBN: N.A
Category: Civilization, Modern
Page: 178
View: 2604

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Scottish Emigration to Colonial America, 1607-1785


Author: David Dobson
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820340782
Category: History
Page: 280
View: 3717

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Before 1650, only a few hundred Scots had trickled into the American colonies, but by the early 1770s the number had risen to 10,000 per year. A conservative estimate of the total number of Scots who settled in North America prior to 1785 is around 150,000. Who were these Scots? What did they do? Where did they settle? What factors motivated their emigration? Dobson's work, based on original research on both sides of the Atlantic, comprehensively identifies the Scottish contribution to the settlement of North America prior to 1785, with particular emphasis on the seventeenth century.

Exploring the Scottish Past

Themes in the History of Scottish Society
Author: Thomas Martin Devine
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 9781898410386
Category: Scot
Page: 260
View: 5575

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This is a collection of fifteen essays written over the last twenty years by one of Scotland's most eminent historians. The material concentrates on four broad themes in seventeenth-, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Scottish history: Merchants, Unions and Trade; Scottish Economic Development; The Highlands; and the Rural Lowlands.

To the Ends of the Earth

Scotland's Diaspora, 1750-2010
Author: T. M. Devine
Publisher: Smithsonian Institution
ISBN: 1588343189
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 4031

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The Scots are one of the world's greatest nations of emigrants. For centuries, untold numbers of men, women, and children have sought their fortunes in every conceivable walk of life and in every imaginable climate. All over the British Empire, the United States, and elsewhere, the Scottish contribution to the development of the modern world has been a formidable one, from finance to industry, philosophy to politics. To the Ends of the Earth puts this extraordinary epic center stage, taking many famous stories--from the Highland Clearances and emigration to the Scottish Enlightenment and empire--and removing layers of myth and sentiment to reveal the no-less-startling truth. Whether in the creation of great cities or prairie farms, the Scottish element always left a distinctive trace, and Devine pays particular attention to the exceptional Scottish role as traders, missionaries, and soldiers. This major new book is also a study of the impact of the global world on Scotland itself and the degree to which the Scottish economy was for many years an imperial economy, with intimate, important links through shipping, engineering, jute, and banking to the most remote of settlements. Filled with fascinating stories and an acute awareness of the poverty and social inequality that provoked so much emigration, To the Ends of the Earth will make its readers think about the world in a quite different way. From the Hardcover edition.

The Scots in South Africa

Ethnicity, identity, gender and race, 1772-1914
Author: John M. MacKenzie,Nigel R. Dalziel
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 1847796893
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 5909

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The description of South Africa as a 'rainbow nation' has always been taken to embrace the black, brown and white peoples who constitute its population. But each of these groups can be sub-divided and in the white case, the Scots have made one of the most distinctive contributions to the country's history. The Scots, as in North America and Australasia, constituted an important element in the patterns of White settlement. They were already present in the area of Dutch East India Company rule and, after the first British occupation of the Cape in 1795, their numbers rose dramatically. They were exceptionally active in such areas as exploration, botanical and scientific endeavour, military campaigns, the emergence of Christian missions, Western education, intellectual institutions, the professions as well as enterprise and technical developments, business, commerce and journalism. This book is the first full-length study of their role from the eighteenth to twentieth centuries. It highlights the interaction of Scots with African peoples, the manner in which missions and schools were credited with producing 'Black Scotsmen' and the ways in which they pursued many distinctive policies. It also deals with the inter-weaving of issues of gender, class and race as well as with the means by which Scots clung to their ethnicity through founding various social and cultural societies. This book offers a major contribution to both Scottish and South African history and in the process illuminates a significant field of the Scottish Diaspora that has so far received little attention.

The Scottish Pioneers of Upper Canada, 1784-1855

Glengarry and Beyond
Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 9781897045015
Category: History
Page: 376
View: 5666

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Scots, some of Upper Canadas earliest pioneers, influenced its early development. This book charts the progress of Scottish settlement throughout the province.

Scottish Quakers and Early America, 1650-1700


Author: David Dobson
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806347651
Category: Reference
Page: 52
View: 9790

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Mr. Dobson continues with his series of booklets pertaining to unexplored aspects of Scottish genealogy. The first of these new titles is his Scottish Quakers and Early America, the aim of which is to identify members of the Society of Friends in Scotland prior to 1700 and the Scottish origins of many of the Quakers who settled in East Jersey in the 1680s. Quakerism came to Scotland with the Cromwellian occupation of the 1650s. Scottish missionaries eventually spread the faith to various locations throughout the country, including Aberdeen in the Northeast, Edinburgh and Kelso in the southeast, and Hamilton in the west. The Society of Friends never grew to large numbers in Scotland, however, owing to its persecution by both the Episcopal and Presbyterian churches, as well as civic authorities. Understandably, a number of Scottish Quakers ultimately emigrated to the North American colonies; for example, there were some Scottish Quakers among the landowners of West Jersey as early as 1664, and between 1682 and 1685 several shiploads of emigrants left the ports of Leith, Montrose, and Aberdeen for East Jersey. Drawing upon research conducted in both Scotland and the United States in manuscript and in published sources, David Dobson has here amassed all the genealogical data that we know of concerning members of the Society of Friends in Scotland prior to 1700 and the origins of Scottish Quakers living in East New Jersey in the 1680s. While there is great deal of variation in the descriptions of the roughly 500 Scottish Quakers listed in the volume, the entries typically give the individual's name, date or place of birth, and occupation, and sometimes the name of a spouse or date of marriage, name of parents, place and reason for imprisonment in Scotland, place of indenture, date of death, and the source of the information. Without a doubt this is a ground-breaking work on the subject of Scottish emigration to North America during the colonial period.

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Scottish History


Author: T. M. Devine,Jenny Wormald
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191624330
Category: History
Page: 720
View: 4476

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Over the last three decades major advances in research and scholarship have transformed understanding of the Scottish past. In this landmark study some of the most eminent writers on the subject, together with emerging new talents, have combined to produce a large-scale volume which reconsiders in fresh and illuminating ways the classic themes of the nation's history since the sixteenth century as well as a number of new topics which are only now receiving detailed attention. Such major themes as the Reformation, the Union of 1707, the Scottish Enlightenment, clearances, industrialisation, empire, emigration, and the Great War are approached from novel and fascinating perspectives, but so too are such issues as the Scottish environment, myth, family, criminality, the literary tradition, and Scotland's contemporary history. All chapters contain expert syntheses of current knowledge, but their authors also stand back and reflect critically on the questions which still remain unanswered, the issues which generate dispute and controversy, and sketch out where appropriate the agenda for future research. The Handbook also places the Scottish experience firmly into an international historical perspective with a considerable focus on the age-old emigration of the Scottish people, the impact of successive waves of immigrants to Scotland, and the nation's key role within the British Empire. The overall result is a vibrant and stimulating review of modern Scottish history: essential reading for students and scholars alike.

Scotland and Its First American Colony, 1683-1765


Author: Ned C. Landsman
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400854989
Category: History
Page: 376
View: 8422

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Against the background of a distinctive Lowland society transformed by commercializing and Anglicizing influences in the years after Scotland's union with England, the author traces the establishment of the East Jersey colony in 1683 and its spread westward to incorporate the whole of the New York to Philadelphia corridor. Originally published in 1985. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Scottish Migration Since 1750

Reasons and Results
Author: James C. Docherty
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 0761867953
Category: Social Science
Page: 204
View: 6656

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Scottish Migration since 1750: Reasons and Results begins a fresh chapter in migration studies using new methods and unpublished sources to map the course of Scottish migration between 1750 and 1990. It explains why the Scottish population grew after 1650, why most Scots continued to be female, and the underlying economic reasons for Scottish emigration after 1820. It surveys migration to England, Canada, United States, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. It explores their names, marriages, family structures, and religions, and assesses how well they really fared compared to other British migrants. Far from being just another Celtic sob story, this book offers a model about how the histories of other migrant groups might be reappraised.

Scots in the USA and Canada, 1825-1875


Author: David Dobson
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806353643
Category: Reference
Page: 154
View: 3933

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Nineteenth-century emigration from Scotland to the U.S. was the continuation of a process that had its roots in the 17th century. Unlike the majority of European emigrants, who represented surplus rural workers from an agrarian society, the Scottish emigrants of the Victorian period were skilled, educated workers from urban industrial backgrounds whose expertise was in great demand in the rapidly industrializing cities of North America. Between 1825 and 1838, more than 60,000 emigrants left Scotland bound for North America; from 1840 to 1853, nearly 30,000 emigrated from there; and in 1881 alone, 38,000 left for the U.S. and 3,000 left for Canada, mostly via Greenock. In this context, we are pleased to publish the fifth installment (fifth book) in David Dobson's Scots in the USA and Canada, 1825-1875, a series designed to compensate for the lack of official Scottish passenger lists to North America during the 19th century (see also Part One, Part Two, Part Three, and Part Four). Containing about 1,800 sketches not found in the prior books, Part Five brings the total number of descriptions of the Scottish men and women and their families who were part of this great exodus to about 8,000. Dr. Dobson's findings come from primary sources in Scotland and North America. Parts One and Two derive from Scottish newspapers as well as from a handful of documents in the National Archives of Scotland. Part Three is based on the records of the Scottish Register of Sasines and Register of Deeds, as well as newspapers, found in the National Archives of Scotland in Edinburgh. Part Four is based on documents housed at the National Archives of Canada in Ottawa, the Public Archives of Nova Scotia in Halifax, and a number of libraries and archives in Scotland. The data found in Part Five derives from newspapers and other documents in the National Archives of Scotland in Edinburgh. Researchers will find a list of references at the back of each book. Dr. Dobson has arranged these expatriates alphabetically in each Part and, while the descriptions vary, he gives the individual's full name, place of residence in North America (country, state/province, or city), an identifying date, and the source of the information. In addition, many of the entries indicate the individual's date of birth, father's name and occupation or place of residence, spouse, or the name of the vessel upon which he or she arrived.

Scottish Diaspora


Author: Tanja Bueltmann
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748650628
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 5513

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This introductory history of the Scottish diaspora (c.1700 to 1945) explores migration, Scots' experiences where they landed and the reverse impact of this migration on Scotland. It examines the geographies of the diaspora and key theories, concepts and t

Scots in Victorian and Edwardian Belfast

A Study in Elite Migration
Author: Kyle Hughes
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748679936
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 5114

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A new departure in Scottish and Irish migration studiesThe Scottish diasporic communities closest to home-those which are part of what we sometimes term the 'near Diaspora'-are those we know least about. Whilst an interest in the overseas Scottish diaspora has grown in recent years, Scots who chose to settle in other parts of the United Kingdom have been largely neglected. This book addresses this imbalance.Scots travelled freely around the industrial centres of northern Britain throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and Belfast was one of the most important ports of call for thousands of Scots. The Scots played key roles in shaping Belfast society in the modern period: they were essential to its industrial development; they were at the centre of many cultural, philanthropic and religious initiatives and were welcomed by the host community accordingly.Yet despite their obvious significance, in staunchly Protestant, Unionist, and at times insular and ill at ease Belfast, individual Scots could be viewed with suspicion by their hosts, dismissed as 'strangers' and cast in the role of interfering outsiders.Key FeaturesThe only book-length scholarly study of the Scots in modern Ireland.Brings to light the fundamental importance of Scottish migration to Belfast society during the nineteenth century.Advances our knowledge and understanding of Scotland's 'near diaspora.'Highlights areas of tension in Ulster-Scottish relations during the Home Rule era.Puts forward a new agenda for a better understanding of British in-migration to Ireland in the modern period.

Scottish Ethnicity and the Making of New Zealand Society, 1850-1930


Author: Tanja Bueltmann
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748688773
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 4185

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This book makes an original contribution to the growing body of knowledge on the Scots abroad, presenting a coherent and comprehensive account of the Scottish immigrant experience in New Zealand.

Colonists from Scotland

Emigration to North America, 1707-1783
Author: Ian C. Graham,Ian Charles Cargill Graham
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 9780806345178
Category: Reference
Page: 224
View: 3650

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This distinguished monograph is a treatise on the causes and character of Scottish emigration to North America prior to the American Revolution. Entire chapters are then devoted to Lowland and Highland emigration, forced transportation of felons and the drafting of Scottish troops to the colonies, rising rents and other factors in the Scottish social structure, and the British government's role in colonization. Three concluding chapters cover the geographical centers of Scottish settlement--especially the Carolinas.

Imperial Immigrants

Scottish Settlers in the Upper Ottawa Valley, 1815-1840
Author: Michael E. Vance
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1554887569
Category: Social Science
Page: 251
View: 3503

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Between 1815 and 1832, Great Britain settled more than 3,500 individuals, mostly from the Scottish Lowlands, in the Ottawa Valley. These government-assisted emigrations, which began immediately after the Napoleonic Wars, are explored to reveal their impact on Upper Canada. Seeking to transform their lives and their society, early Scots settlers crossed the Atlantic for their own purposes. Although they did not blindly serve the interests of empire builders, their settlement led to the dispossession of the original First Nation inhabitants, thus supporting the British imperial government's strategic military goals. After transferring homeland religious and political conflict to the colony, Scottish settlers led the demand for political reform that emerged in the 1830s. As a consequence, their migration and settlement reveals as much about the depth of social conflict in the homeland and in the colonies as it does about the preoccupations of the British imperial state.

The Great Immigration: Scots in Cracow and Little Poland, circa 1500-1660


Author: Waldemar Kowalski
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004303103
Category: History
Page: 330
View: 1566

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In The Great Immigration Waldemar Kowalski provides an analysis of urbanized Scots in Little Poland from the 1570s to the 1660s, including their commercial activities and the networks they built in their host communities, particularly in Cracow.

Europeans on the Move

Studies on European Migration, 1500-1800
Author: Nicholas P. Canny
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 329
View: 2896

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This is a wide-ranging and original collection of essays on early modern migration. The contributors, including Bernard Bailyn, Ned Landsman, L.M. Cullen, and Nicolas Sanchez-Albornoz, examine the scale and character of migration from a range of countries. Besides collectively finding that such migration more often led to an early death than to a quick fortune, the essays also suggest that the period 1500-1800 was transitional between the narrowly focused migration of the medieval period and the mass migration of the nineteenth century.