Scottish emigration and Scottish society

proceedings of the Scottish Historical Studies Seminar, University of Strathclyde 1990-1991
Author: Thomas Martin Devine
Publisher: John Donald
ISBN: N.A
Category: Civilization, Modern
Page: 178
View: 7073

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Exploring the Scottish Past

Themes in the History of Scottish Society
Author: Thomas Martin Devine
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 9781898410386
Category: Scot
Page: 260
View: 8510

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This is a collection of fifteen essays written over the last twenty years by one of Scotland's most eminent historians. The material concentrates on four broad themes in seventeenth-, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Scottish history: Merchants, Unions and Trade; Scottish Economic Development; The Highlands; and the Rural Lowlands.

Scottish Emigration to Colonial America, 1607-1785


Author: David Dobson
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820340782
Category: History
Page: 280
View: 943

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Before 1650, only a few hundred Scots had trickled into the American colonies, but by the early 1770s the number had risen to 10,000 per year. A conservative estimate of the total number of Scots who settled in North America prior to 1785 is around 150,000. Who were these Scots? What did they do? Where did they settle? What factors motivated their emigration? Dobson's work, based on original research on both sides of the Atlantic, comprehensively identifies the Scottish contribution to the settlement of North America prior to 1785, with particular emphasis on the seventeenth century.

Scots in the USA and Canada, 1825-1875


Author: David Dobson
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806351780
Category: Reference
Page: 122
View: 575

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Nineteenth-century emigration from Scotland to the United States was a continuation of a process that had its roots in the seventeenth century. Unlike the majority of European emigrants, who represented surplus rural workers from an agrarian society, the Scottish emigrants of the Victorian period were skilled educated workers from urban industrial backgrounds whose expertise was in great demand in the rapidly industrializing cities of North America. While the total number of Scots emigrating is difficult to estimate with accuracy, as Irish and Continental emigrants often sailed from Scottish ports, it is likely that over 100,000 emigrants traveled to North America between 1825 and 1880 from Scottish ports. The volume at hand represents the third in a series by Mr. Dobson to list Scottish emigrants of this era (see Part One, Part Two, Part Four, and Part Five of the series). In the absence of official passenger records, this volume is compiled overwhelmingly from Scottish newspapers such as the Edinburgh Evening Courant and the Perthshire Courier, and from the Register of Sasines, Register of Deeds, and other original documents in the National Archives of Scotland. In all, Mr. Dobson names an additional 1,500 Scottish emigrants not mentioned in the earlier volumes, with such identifying characteristics as place of residence, date, and source, and sometimes names and residence of family members and the name of the sailing vessel.

The Scottish Pioneers of Upper Canada, 1784-1855

Glengarry and Beyond
Author: Lucille H. Campey
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 9781897045015
Category: History
Page: 376
View: 3864

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Scots, some of Upper Canadas earliest pioneers, influenced its early development. This book charts the progress of Scottish settlement throughout the province.

Scottish Migration Since 1750

Reasons and Results
Author: James C. Docherty
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 0761867953
Category: Social Science
Page: 204
View: 3105

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This work explains Scotland’s population and migration history using new methods and unpublished sources. It surveys migration to England, Canada, United States, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand to 1990.

Scots in Victorian and Edwardian Belfast

A Study in Elite Migration
Author: Kyle Hughes
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748679936
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 532

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A new departure in Scottish and Irish migration studiesThe Scottish diasporic communities closest to home-those which are part of what we sometimes term the 'near Diaspora'-are those we know least about. Whilst an interest in the overseas Scottish diaspora has grown in recent years, Scots who chose to settle in other parts of the United Kingdom have been largely neglected. This book addresses this imbalance.Scots travelled freely around the industrial centres of northern Britain throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and Belfast was one of the most important ports of call for thousands of Scots. The Scots played key roles in shaping Belfast society in the modern period: they were essential to its industrial development; they were at the centre of many cultural, philanthropic and religious initiatives and were welcomed by the host community accordingly.Yet despite their obvious significance, in staunchly Protestant, Unionist, and at times insular and ill at ease Belfast, individual Scots could be viewed with suspicion by their hosts, dismissed as 'strangers' and cast in the role of interfering outsiders.Key FeaturesThe only book-length scholarly study of the Scots in modern Ireland.Brings to light the fundamental importance of Scottish migration to Belfast society during the nineteenth century.Advances our knowledge and understanding of Scotland's 'near diaspora.'Highlights areas of tension in Ulster-Scottish relations during the Home Rule era.Puts forward a new agenda for a better understanding of British in-migration to Ireland in the modern period.

Scottish Ethnicity and the Making of New Zealand Society, 1850-1930


Author: Tanja Bueltmann
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748646361
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 4151

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The Scots accounted for around a quarter of all UK-born immigrants to New Zealand between 1861 and 1945, but have only been accorded scant attention in New Zealand histories, specialist immigration histories and Scottish Diaspora Studies. This is peculiar because the flow of Scots to New Zealand, although relatively unimportant to Scotland, constituted a sizable element to the country's much smaller population. Seen as adaptable, integrating relatively more quickly than other ethnic migrant groups in New Zealand, the Scots' presence was obscured by a fixation on the romanticised shortbread tin facade of Scottish identity overseas.Uncovering Scottish ethnicity from the verges of nostalgia, this study documents the notable imprint Scots left on New Zealand. It examines Scottish immigrant community life, culture and identity between 1850 and 1930.

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Scottish History


Author: T. M. Devine,Jenny Wormald
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191624330
Category: History
Page: 720
View: 656

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Over the last three decades major advances in research and scholarship have transformed understanding of the Scottish past. In this landmark study some of the most eminent writers on the subject, together with emerging new talents, have combined to produce a large-scale volume which reconsiders in fresh and illuminating ways the classic themes of the nation's history since the sixteenth century as well as a number of new topics which are only now receiving detailed attention. Such major themes as the Reformation, the Union of 1707, the Scottish Enlightenment, clearances, industrialisation, empire, emigration, and the Great War are approached from novel and fascinating perspectives, but so too are such issues as the Scottish environment, myth, family, criminality, the literary tradition, and Scotland's contemporary history. All chapters contain expert syntheses of current knowledge, but their authors also stand back and reflect critically on the questions which still remain unanswered, the issues which generate dispute and controversy, and sketch out where appropriate the agenda for future research. The Handbook also places the Scottish experience firmly into an international historical perspective with a considerable focus on the age-old emigration of the Scottish people, the impact of successive waves of immigrants to Scotland, and the nation's key role within the British Empire. The overall result is a vibrant and stimulating review of modern Scottish history: essential reading for students and scholars alike.

Scottish Society, 1500-1800


Author: Robert Allen Houston,Ian D. Whyte
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521891677
Category: History
Page: 312
View: 3320

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The volume covers many of the most significant themes in pre-industrial Scottish society.

Scotland No More?

Emigration from Scotland in the Twentieth Century
Author: Marjory Harper
Publisher: Luath Press Ltd
ISBN: 1909912727
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 6619

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Shortlisted for Scottish History Book of the Year at the Saltire Society Literary Awards 2013Scotland No More? taps into the need we all share — to know who we are and where we come from. Scots have always been on the move, and from all quarters we are bombarded with evidence of interest in their historical comings and goings. Earlier eras have been well covered, but until now the story of Scotland's twentieth-century diaspora has remained largely untold.Scotland No More? considers the causes and consequences of the phenomenon, scrutinising the exodus and giving free rein to the voices of those at the heart of the story: the emigrants themselves.

Colonists from Scotland

Emigration to North America, 1707-1783
Author: Ian C. Graham,Ian Charles Cargill Graham
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 9780806345178
Category: Reference
Page: 224
View: 3939

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This distinguished monograph is a treatise on the causes and character of Scottish emigration to North America prior to the American Revolution. Entire chapters are then devoted to Lowland and Highland emigration, forced transportation of felons and the drafting of Scottish troops to the colonies, rising rents and other factors in the Scottish social structure, and the British government's role in colonization. Three concluding chapters cover the geographical centers of Scottish settlement--especially the Carolinas.

Scotland and Nationalism

Scottish Society and Politics 1707 to the Present
Author: Christopher Harvie
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134337922
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 3569

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Scotland and Nationalism provides an authoritative survey of Scottish social and political history from 1707 to the present day. Focusing on political nationalism in Scotland, Christopher Harvie examines why this nationalism remained apparently in abeyance for two and a half centuries, and why it became so relevant in the second half of the twentieth century. This fourth edition brings the story and historiography of Scottish society and politics up-to-date. Additions also include a brand new biographical index of key personalities, along with a glossary of nationalist groups.

Scottish Diaspora


Author: Tanja Bueltmann
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748650628
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 5152

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This introductory history of the Scottish diaspora (c.1700 to 1945) explores migration, Scots' experiences where they landed and the reverse impact of this migration on Scotland. It examines the geographies of the diaspora and key theories, concepts and t

A Global Clan

Scottish Migrant Networks and Identities since the Eighteenth Century
Author: Angela McCarthy
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857712950
Category: Social Science
Page: 248
View: 7836

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Through a unique approach connecting personal accounts to 'networks' of kin and social groups, ‘A Global Clan’ engages in expanding debates on migration that link imperial history and the European diaspora. Migration from Scotland since the eighteenth century has been a powerful force, influencing the politics, economics, demography, sociology, and culture of many regions across the world. This book uses new material to explore Scottish migrant networks, identities, and personal experiences in areas as diverse as India, New Zealand, and Canada. Assorted migrant voices are presented, from Ellis Island and Australia, the tracts of transients in Asia and the Caribbean, and voluminous correspondence from North America. The overarching approach promises a significant contribution to the historiography that will make it essential reading for scholars of migration and identity.

Scottish Quakers and Early America, 1650-1700


Author: David Dobson
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806347651
Category: Reference
Page: 52
View: 2712

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Mr. Dobson continues with his series of booklets pertaining to unexplored aspects of Scottish genealogy. The first of these new titles is his Scottish Quakers and Early America, the aim of which is to identify members of the Society of Friends in Scotland prior to 1700 and the Scottish origins of many of the Quakers who settled in East Jersey in the 1680s. Quakerism came to Scotland with the Cromwellian occupation of the 1650s. Scottish missionaries eventually spread the faith to various locations throughout the country, including Aberdeen in the Northeast, Edinburgh and Kelso in the southeast, and Hamilton in the west. The Society of Friends never grew to large numbers in Scotland, however, owing to its persecution by both the Episcopal and Presbyterian churches, as well as civic authorities. Understandably, a number of Scottish Quakers ultimately emigrated to the North American colonies; for example, there were some Scottish Quakers among the landowners of West Jersey as early as 1664, and between 1682 and 1685 several shiploads of emigrants left the ports of Leith, Montrose, and Aberdeen for East Jersey. Drawing upon research conducted in both Scotland and the United States in manuscript and in published sources, David Dobson has here amassed all the genealogical data that we know of concerning members of the Society of Friends in Scotland prior to 1700 and the origins of Scottish Quakers living in East New Jersey in the 1680s. While there is great deal of variation in the descriptions of the roughly 500 Scottish Quakers listed in the volume, the entries typically give the individual's name, date or place of birth, and occupation, and sometimes the name of a spouse or date of marriage, name of parents, place and reason for imprisonment in Scotland, place of indenture, date of death, and the source of the information. Without a doubt this is a ground-breaking work on the subject of Scottish emigration to North America during the colonial period.

Jews in Glasgow 1879-1939

immigration and integration
Author: Ben Braber
Publisher: Vallentine Mitchell
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 236
View: 5300

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This is the first study of the integration of Jewish immigrants, from eastern and central Europe, into Scotland and places Scottish Jewish history in context. The book looks at aspects of their immigration and integration into Scottish society, namely: the reaction of the native population and the Jewish responses; the education of immigrant children; the participation of Jews in the Glasgow economy; their participation in the political and the arts world; and changes in Jewish organisations, religious habits and lifestyle. A special chapter is devoted to post-1945 developments bringing the history of the Jews in Glasgow up to the present day. The final chapter compares the Jewish experience in Glasgow to that of other Jews in English cities and to the experience of other immigrants in Glasgow such as the Irish, Italians, Germans and Asians and brings out what was and is distinctive about Glasgow and Scotland.

Imperial Immigrants

Scottish Settlers in the Upper Ottawa Valley, 1815-1840
Author: Michael E. Vance
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1554887569
Category: Social Science
Page: 251
View: 319

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Between 1815 and 1832, Great Britain settled more than 3,500 individuals, mostly from the Scottish Lowlands, in the Ottawa Valley. These government-assisted emigrations, which began immediately after the Napoleonic Wars, are explored to reveal their impact on Upper Canada. Seeking to transform their lives and their society, early Scots settlers crossed the Atlantic for their own purposes. Although they did not blindly serve the interests of empire builders, their settlement led to the dispossession of the original First Nation inhabitants, thus supporting the British imperial government's strategic military goals. After transferring homeland religious and political conflict to the colony, Scottish settlers led the demand for political reform that emerged in the 1830s. As a consequence, their migration and settlement reveals as much about the depth of social conflict in the homeland and in the colonies as it does about the preoccupations of the British imperial state.

The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume II: The Eighteenth Century


Author: P. J. Marshall
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191647357
Category: History
Page: 662
View: 384

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Volume II of the Oxford History of the British Empire examines the history of British worldwide expansion from the Glorious Revolution of 1689 to the end of the Napoleonic Wars, a crucial phase in the creation of the modern British Empire. This is the age of General Wolfe, Clive of India, and Captain Cook. The international team of experts deploy the latest scholarly research to trace and analyse development and expansion over more than a century. They show how trade, warfare, and migration created an Empire, at first overwhelmingly in the Americas but later increasingly in Asia. Although the Empire was ruptured by the American Revolution, it survived and grew into the British Empire that was to dominate the world during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. series blurb The Oxford History of the British Empire is a major new assessment of the Empire in the light of recent scholarship and the progressive opening of historical records. It deals with the interaction of British and non-western societies from the Elizabethan era to the late twentieth century, aiming to provide a balanced treatment of the ruled as well as the rulers, and to take into account the significance of the Empire for the peoples of the British Isles. It explores economic and social trends as well as political.