Ruth and the Green Book


Author: Calvin Alexander Ramsey,Gwen Strauss
Publisher: Carolrhoda Books
ISBN: 1467738174
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 32
View: 9095

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Ruth was so excited to take a trip in her family's new car! In the early 1950s, few African Americans could afford to buy cars, so this would be an adventure. But she soon found out that black travelers weren't treated very well in some towns. Many hotels and gas stations refused service to black people. Daddy was upset about something called Jim Crow laws . . . Finally, a friendly attendant at a gas station showed Ruth's family The Green Book. It listed all of the places that would welcome black travelers. With this guidebook—and the kindness of strangers—Ruth could finally make a safe journey from Chicago to her grandma's house in Alabama. Ruth's story is fiction, but The Green Book and its role in helping a generation of African American travelers avoid some of the indignities of Jim Crow are historical fact.

Ruth and the Green Book


Author: Calvin Alexander Ramsey,Gwen Strauss
Publisher: Carolrhoda Books
ISBN: 0761362185
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 32
View: 4646

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When Ruth and her parents take a motor trip from Chicago to Alabama to visit her grandma, they rely on a pamphlet called "The Negro Motorist Green Book" to find places that will serve them. Includes facts about "The Green Book."

Ruth and the Green Book


Author: Calvin A. Ramsey,Gwen Strauss
Publisher: Carolrhoda Books
ISBN: 0761352554
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 32
View: 9889

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Ruth and the Green Book is the story of one black family's trip from Chicago to Alabama by car in the late 1940s. Along the way they encounter prejudice, but they also discover The Green Book, a real guide to accommodations which was published for decades to aid African-American travelers as they faced prejudice on the roads across the country.

The Green Book


Author: Jill Paton Walsh
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
ISBN: 1466801573
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 96
View: 8338

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Pattie and her family are among the last refugees to flee a dying Earth in an old spaceship. And when the group finally lands on the distant planet which is to be their new home, it seems that the four-year journey has been a success. But as they begin to settle this shiny new world, they discover that the colony is in serious jeopardy. Nothing on this planet is edible, and they may not be able to grow food. With supplies dwindling, Pattie and her sister decide to take the one chance that might make life possible on Shine.

Belle, the Last Mule at Gee's Bend

A Civil Rights Story
Author: Calvin A. Ramsey,Bettye Stroud,John Holyfield
Publisher: Candlewick Press
ISBN: 0763640581
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 32
View: 5058

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In Gee's Bend, Alabama, Miz Pettway tells young Alex about the historic role her mule played in the struggle for civil rights led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Includes factual information about the community of Gee's Bend and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Narrative Desire and the Book of Ruth


Author: Stephanie Day Powell
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 0567682234
Category: Religion
Page: 224
View: 635

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Stephanie Day Powell illuminates the myriad forms of persuasion, inducement, discontent, and heartbreak experienced by readers of Ruth. Writing from a lesbian perspective, Powell draws upon biblical scholarship, contemporary film and literature, narrative studies, feminist and queer theories, trauma studies and psychoanalytic theory to trace the workings of desire that produced the book of Ruth and shaped its history of reception. Wrestling with the arguments for and against reading Ruth as a love story between women, Powell gleans new insights into the ancient world in which Ruth was written. Ruth is known as a tale of two courageous women, the Moabite Ruth and her Israelite mother-in-law Naomi. As widows with scarce means of financial or social support, Ruth and Naomi are forced to creatively subvert the economic and legal systems of their day in order to survive. Through exceptional acts of loyalty, they, along with their kinsman Boaz, re-establish the bonds of family and community, while preserving the line of Israel's great king David. Yet for many, the story of Ruth is deeply dissatisfying. Scholars increasingly recognize how Ruth's textual "gaps†? and ambiguities render conventional interpretations of the book's meaning and purpose uncertain. Feminist and queer interpreters question the appropriation of a woman's story to uphold patriarchal institutions and heteronormative values. Such avenues of inquiry lend themselves to questions of narrative desire, that is, the study of how stories frame our desires and how our own complex longings affect the way we read.

Let Them Play


Author: Margot Theis Raven
Publisher: Sleeping Bear Press
ISBN: 1410308154
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 32
View: 1581

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Segregated Charleston, SC, 1955: There are 62 official Little League programs in South Carolina -- all but one of the leagues is composed entirely of white players. The Cannon Street YMCA All-Stars, an all-black team, is formed in the hopes of playing in the state's annual Little League Tournament. What should have been a time of enjoyment, however, turns sour when all of the other leagues refuse to play against them and even pull out of the program. As the only remaining Little League team in the state, Cannon Street was named state winner by default, giving the boys a legitimate spot in the Little League Baseball World Series held in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. While the Cannon Street team is invited to the game as guests, they are not allowed to participate since they have not officially "played" and won their state's tournament. Let Them Play takes its name from the chant shouted by the spectators who attended the World Series final. Author Margot Theis Raven recounts the inspiring tales of the Cannon Street All-Stars as they arrived in Williamsport, PA and never got the chance to play for the title thanks to the bigotry and ignorance of the South Carolina teams. Winning by forfeit, the Cannon Streeters were subsequently not allowed to participate in Williamsburg because they had not "played" their way into the tournament. Let Them Play is an important civil rights story in American history with an even more important message about equality and tolerance. It's a tale of humanity against the backdrop of America's favorite pastime that's sure to please fans of the sport and mankind. This summer will mark the 50th year since the fans' shouts of Let Them Play fell on deaf ears and 14 boys learned a cruel lesson in backwards politics and prejudice. This book can help teach us a new lesson and assure something like this never happens again.

Green Girl

A Novel
Author: Kate Zambreno
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062322826
Category: Fiction
Page: 304
View: 5844

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With the fierce emotional and intellectual power of such classics as Jean Rhys's Good Morning, Midnight, Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar, and Clarice Lispector's The Hour of the Star, Kate Zambreno's novel Green Girl is a provocative, sharply etched portrait of a young woman navigating the spectrum between anomie and epiphany. First published in 2011 in a small press edition, Green Girl was named one of the best books of the year by critics including Dennis Cooper and Roxane Gay. In Bookforum, James Greer called it "ambitious in a way few works of fiction are." This summer it is being republished in an all-new Harper Perennial trade paperback, significantly revised by the author, and including an extensive P.S. section including never before published outtakes, an interview with the author, and a new essay by Zambreno. Zambreno's heroine, Ruth, is a young American in London, kin to Jean Seberg gamines and contemporary celebutantes, by day spritzing perfume at the department store she calls Horrids, by night trying desperately to navigate a world colored by the unwanted gaze of others and the uncertainty of her own self-regard. Ruth, the green girl, joins the canon of young people existing in that important, frightening, and exhilarating period of drift and anxiety between youth and adulthood, and her story is told through the eyes of one of the most surprising and unforgettable narrators in recent fiction—a voice at once distanced and maternal, indulgent yet blackly funny. And the result is a piercing yet humane meditation on alienation, consumerism, the city, self-awareness, and desire, by a novelist who has been compared with Jean Rhys, Virginia Woolf, and Elfriede Jelinek.

The Post-Racial Negro Green Book


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780692950920
Category: Social Science
Page: 204
View: 641

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The Post-Racial Negro Green Book is a state-by-state compilation of occurrences, information, and data that document a pattern of 21st century racial bias against Black people in the United States. It is an archive intended to preserve the voluminous amount of contemporary history on the topic in a permanent medium for the sake of review, consideration, discussion, and action.

The Book of Ruth


Author: Jane Hamilton
Publisher: HMH
ISBN: 0547523599
Category: Fiction
Page: 336
View: 3583

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PEN/Hemingway Award Winner: An “enthralling” novel of a woman trapped within a tragically dysfunctional family (Entertainment Weekly). From the New York Times–bestselling author of The Excellent Lombards and A Map of the World, this is “an extraordinary story of a family’s disintegration [that] will be compared to Jane Smiley’s A Thousand Acres” (People). It follows Ruth Grey, a young woman in a tiny Illinois farm town, who has lost her father to World War II, and constantly faces her unhappy mother’s wrath—when she isn’t being ignored in favor of her math-prodigy brother. As Ruth navigates her lonely life, she strives to find happiness and pleasure where she can, but the world may conspire to defeat her. “A sly and wistful, if harrowing, human comedy . . . [An] original voice in fiction and one well worth listening to.” —The Boston Sunday Globe “Unforgettably, beat by beat, Hamilton maps the best and worst of the human heart and all the mysterious, uncharted country in between.” —Kirkus Reviews “Hamilton’s story builds to a shocking crescendo. Her small-town characters are as appealingly offbeat and brushed with grace as any found in Alice Hoffman’s or Anne Tyler’s novels.” —Glamour

Crossing Ebenezer Creek


Author: Tonya Bolden
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1599903199
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 240
View: 2816

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Award-winning author Tonya Bolden sheds light on an unknown moment of the Civil War to readers in a searing, poetic novel about the dream of freedom.

Latte for Life

45 Devotions from the Book of Ruth
Author: Renae Brumbaugh Green
Publisher: BroadStreet Publishing Group LLC
ISBN: 1424553679
Category: Religion
Page: 160
View: 7437

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Drama. Romance. Intrigue. The Bible contains all the elements of a blockbuster movie, and the book of Ruth is one of the best. Latte for Life: 45 Devotions from the Book of Ruth studies the life of Ruth as she marries, loses her husband, follows her mother-in-law to an unknown land, and finds love again. Each reading includes: Scripture from Ruth and life-infusing commentary it—just like that delicious first taste of coffee in the morning.Daily reflection and conversation with God that will sweeten your life.Other relevant Scriptures that leave you craving for more.A final quote to be savored like that last drop of coffee. Sacrificial love and happy endings aren’t always fictional. God has already written a beautiful love story for you. All you have to do is accept it.

The Only Road


Author: Alexandra Diaz
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1481457527
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 320
View: 9888

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PURA BELPRÉ HONOR BOOK ALA NOTABLE BOOK “An important, must-have addition to the growing body of literature with immigrant themes.” —School Library Journal (starred review) Twelve-year-old Jaime makes the treacherous and life-changing journey from his home in Guatemala to live with his older brother in the United States in this “powerful and timely” (Booklist, starred review) middle grade novel. Jaime is sitting on his bed drawing when he hears a scream. Instantly, he knows: Miguel, his cousin and best friend, is dead. Everyone in Jaime’s small town in Guatemala knows someone who has been killed by the Alphas, a powerful gang that’s known for violence and drug trafficking. Anyone who refuses to work for them is hurt or killed—like Miguel. With Miguel gone, Jaime fears that he is next. There’s only one choice: accompanied by his cousin Ángela, Jaime must flee his home to live with his older brother in New Mexico. Inspired by true events, The Only Road is an individual story of a boy who feels that leaving his home and risking everything is his only chance for a better life. The story is “told with heartbreaking honesty,” Booklist raved, and “will bring readers face to face with the harsh realities immigrants go through in the hope of finding a better, safer life, and it will likely cause them to reflect on what it means to be human.”

Show Way


Author: Jacqueline Woodson
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0399237496
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 48
View: 4109

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The making of "Show ways," or quilts which once served as secret maps for freedom-seeking slaves, is a tradition passed from mother to daughter in the author's family.

Ruth and Naomi

A Bible Story
Author: Jean Marzollo
Publisher: Little Brown & Company
ISBN: 9780316741392
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 32
View: 9400

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Retells the Old Testament story of the faithful Ruth, who gave up her country and everything familiar to her in order to accompany her mother-in-law Naomi to Bethlehem.

Babe Ruth and the Ice Cream Mess


Author: Dan Gutman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 068985529X
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 32
View: 6035

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Seven-year-old George "Babe" Ruth (who would grow up to become a baseball legend) steals a dollar from his father's saloon to treat his friends to ice cream. Includes timeline.

Shifting Ground


Author: Ruth M. McVeigh
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 9781462828593
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 289
View: 9908

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This autobiography traces the authors tempestuous 22-year marriage to an undiagnosed manic depressive (Bipolar Affective Disorder) with whom she raised two children. Throughout the years, the emotional and geographical ground under the authors feet kept shifting, There were travels, adventures, job changes and financial disasters, love and fun, but also violence and pain. Throughout this story, the benchmarks of manic depression can be clearly identified as can the repercussions on relationships and family life. Two years in Guyana, South America, provided memories no one else could share and kept the couple close when circumstances tended to separate them. They camped and canoed in isolated regions of Algonquin Park, Ontario, explored the streets of London, England and beach-combed on Vancouver Islands west coast. In addition to the unhappy and perplexing aspects of marriage to a manic depressive, this book illustrates the positive side of life with a partner who does not fear consequences, who is adventurous and willing to risk.

A Tale for the Time Being

A Novel
Author: Ruth Ozeki
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101606258
Category: Fiction
Page: 432
View: 4484

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A brilliant, unforgettable novel from bestselling author Ruth Ozeki—shortlisted for the Booker Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award “A time being is someone who lives in time, and that means you, and me, and every one of us who is, or was, or ever will be.” In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there’s only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates’ bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, a Buddhist nun who’s lived more than a century. A diary is Nao’s only solace—and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox—possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao’s drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future. Full of Ozeki’s signature humor and deeply engaged with the relationship between writer and reader, past and present, fact and fiction, quantum physics, history, and myth, A Tale for the Time Being is a brilliantly inventive, beguiling story of our shared humanity and the search for home. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Janus Stone


Author: Elly Griffiths
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547237448
Category: Fiction
Page: 327
View: 2604

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Investigating the discovery of a murdered child on a demolition site, pregnant archaeologist Ruth Galloway teams up with Detective Harry Nelson to discern the victim's identity before realizing that she is being targeted by a dangerous assailant. By the author of The Crossing Places.

Nine Folds Make a Paper Swan


Author: Ruth Gilligan
Publisher: Tin House Books
ISBN: 1941040500
Category: Fiction
Page: 400
View: 7811

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Three intertwining voices span the twentieth century to tell the unknown story of the Jews in Ireland. A heartbreaking portrait of what it means to belong, and how storytelling can redeem us all. At the start of the twentieth century, a young girl and her family emigrate from Lithuania in search of a better life in America, only to land on the Emerald Isle instead. In 1958, a mute Jewish boy locked away in a mental institution outside of Dublin forms an unlikely friendship with a man consumed by the story of the love he lost nearly two decades earlier. And in present-day London, an Irish journalist is forced to confront her conflicting notions of identity and family when her Jewish boyfriend asks her to make a true leap of faith. These three arcs, which span generations and intertwine in revelatory ways, come together to tell the haunting story of Ireland’s all-but-forgotten Jewish community. Ruth Gilligan’s beautiful and heartbreaking Nine Folds Make a Paper Swan explores the question of just how far we will go to understand who we really are, and to feel at home in the world.