Rome's Vestal Virgins


Author: Robin Lorsch Wildfang
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134151667
Category: History
Page: 176
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Comprehensive and thoroughly up-to-date, this volume offers a brand new analysis of the Vestal Virgins’ ritual function in Roman religion. Undertaking a detailed and careful analysis of ancient literary sources, Wildfang argues that the Vestals’ virginity must be understood on a variety of different levels and provides a solution to the problem of the Vestals’ peculiar legal status in ancient Rome. Addressing the one official state priesthood open to women at Rome, this volume explores and analyzes a range of topics including: the rituals enacted by priestesses (both the public rituals performed in connection with official state rites and festivals and the private rites associated only with the order itself) the division and interface between religion, state and family structure the Vestals’ participation in rights that were outside the sphere of traditional female activity. New and insightful, this investigation of one of the most important state cults in ancient Rome is an essential addition to the bookshelves of all those interested in Roman religion, history and culture.

Portraits of the Vestal Virgins, Priestesses of Ancient Rome


Author: Molly Lindner
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472118951
Category: Art
Page: 291
View: 4978

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Molly M. Lindner's new book examines the sculptural presentation of the Vestal Virgins, who, for more than eleven hundred years, dedicated their lives to the goddess Vesta, protector of the Roman state. Though supervised by a male priest, the Pontifex Maximus, they had privileges beyond those of most women; like Roman men, they dispensed favors and influence on behalf of their clients and relatives. The recovery of the Vestals' house, and statues of the priestesses, was an exciting moment in Roman archaeology. In 1883 Rodolfo Lanciani, Director of Antiquities for Rome, discovered the first Vestal statues. Newspapers were filled with details about the huge numbers of sculptures, inscriptions, jewelry, coins, and terracotta figures. Portraits of the Vestal Virgins, Priestesses of Ancient Rome investigates what images of long-dead women tell us about what was important to them. It addresses why portraits were made, and why their portraits—first set up in the late 1st or 2nd century CE—began to appear so much later than portraits of other nonimperial women and other Roman priestesses. The author sheds light on identifying a Vestal portrait among those of other priestesses, and considers why Vestal portraits do not copy each other's headdresses and hairstyles. Fourteen extensively illustrated chapters and a catalog of all known portraits help consider historical clues embedded in the hairstyles and facial features of the Vestals and other women of their day. What has appeared to be a mute collection of marble portraits has been given a voice through this book.

Brides of Rome

A Novel of the Vestal Virgins
Author: Debra Macleod
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 9781514831687
Category:
Page: 280
View: 2136

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Their world was one of punishment, power and privilege. It was a world of war, secrets and sacred duty. It was the world of ancient Rome. And the esteemed Vestal Virgins - priestesses of Vesta, goddess of the home and hearth - protected the Eternal Flame that protected the Eternal City. Dedicated to a thirty-year vow of chaste service, Priestess Pomponia finds herself swept up in the intrigue, violence and bedroom politics of Rome's elite: Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, Octavian and his maneuvering wife Livia, all the while guarding the secret affection she has in her heart. But when a charge of incestum - a broken vow of chastity - is made against the Vestal order, the ultimate punishment looms: death, by being buried alive in the Evil Field. In BRIDES OF ROME, Debra May Macleod has re-created the world of ancient Rome with all its brutality and brilliance, all its rich history and even richer legend. A true page-turner that is as smart as it is compelling, this must-read novel brings the Vestal order to life like never before.

One Virgin Too Many


Author: Lindsey Davis
Publisher: Mysterious Press
ISBN: 0759521298
Category: Fiction
Page: 368
View: 6988

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Marcus Didius Falco, the cynical, hard-boiled investigator from the rough end of Rome, is back from a difficult mission in North Africa. As a result of his hard work, Emperor Vespasian awards Falco with the title of Procurator of Poultry for the Senate & People of Rome, or keeper of the city's sacred geese. Not much of a salary, of course, but the title does give him a better standing with his in-laws. Now, all Falco wants is to spend time relaxing at home with his family. But there is no rest for Falco as he finds himself drawn into the world of the Roman religious cults...& the murder of a member of the Sacred Brotherhoods. And then there's the disappearance of the most likely new candidate for the Order of Vestal Virgins. Falco soon uncovers a sinister cover-up & is too deeply involved to back away from the truth.

Portraits of the Vestal Virgins, Priestesses of Ancient Rome


Author: Molly Lindner
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472118951
Category: Art
Page: 291
View: 1726

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Molly M. Lindner's new book examines the sculptural presentation of the Vestal Virgins, who, for more than eleven hundred years, dedicated their lives to the goddess Vesta, protector of the Roman state. Though supervised by a male priest, the Pontifex Maximus, they had privileges beyond those of most women; like Roman men, they dispensed favors and influence on behalf of their clients and relatives. The recovery of the Vestals' house, and statues of the priestesses, was an exciting moment in Roman archaeology. In 1883 Rodolfo Lanciani, Director of Antiquities for Rome, discovered the first Vestal statues. Newspapers were filled with details about the huge numbers of sculptures, inscriptions, jewelry, coins, and terracotta figures. Portraits of the Vestal Virgins, Priestesses of Ancient Rome investigates what images of long-dead women tell us about what was important to them. It addresses why portraits were made, and why their portraits—first set up in the late 1st or 2nd century CE—began to appear so much later than portraits of other nonimperial women and other Roman priestesses. The author sheds light on identifying a Vestal portrait among those of other priestesses, and considers why Vestal portraits do not copy each other's headdresses and hairstyles. Fourteen extensively illustrated chapters and a catalog of all known portraits help consider historical clues embedded in the hairstyles and facial features of the Vestals and other women of their day. What has appeared to be a mute collection of marble portraits has been given a voice through this book.

A Place at the Altar

Priestesses in Republican Rome
Author: Meghan J. DiLuzio
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400883032
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 3853

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A Place at the Altar illuminates a previously underappreciated dimension of religion in ancient Rome: the role of priestesses in civic cult. Demonstrating that priestesses had a central place in public rituals and institutions, Meghan DiLuzio emphasizes the complex, gender-inclusive nature of Roman priesthood. In ancient Rome, priestly service was a cooperative endeavor, requiring men and women, husbands and wives, and elite Romans and slaves to work together to manage the community's relationship with its gods. Like their male colleagues, priestesses offered sacrifices on behalf of the Roman people, and prayed for the community’s well-being. As they carried out their ritual obligations, they were assisted by female cult personnel, many of them slave women. DiLuzio explores the central role of the Vestal Virgins and shows that they occupied just one type of priestly office open to women. Some priestesses, including the flaminica Dialis, the regina sacrorum, and the wives of the curial priests, served as part of priestly couples. Others, such as the priestesses of Ceres and Fortuna Muliebris, were largely autonomous. A Place at the Altar offers a fresh understanding of how the women of ancient Rome played a leading role in public cult.

Roma

A Novel of Ancient Rome
Author: Steven Saylor
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 9781429917063
Category: Fiction
Page: 576
View: 2454

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Spanning a thousand years, and following the shifting fortunes of two families though the ages, this is the epic saga of Rome, the city and its people. Weaving history, legend, and new archaeological discoveries into a spellbinding narrative, critically acclaimed novelist Steven Saylor gives new life to the drama of the city's first thousand years — from the founding of the city by the ill-fated twins Romulus and Remus, through Rome's astonishing ascent to become the capitol of the most powerful empire in history. Roma recounts the tragedy of the hero-traitor Coriolanus, the capture of the city by the Gauls, the invasion of Hannibal, the bitter political struggles of the patricians and plebeians, and the ultimate death of Rome's republic with the triumph, and assassination, of Julius Caesar. Witnessing this history, and sometimes playing key roles, are the descendents of two of Rome's first families, the Potitius and Pinarius clans: One is the confidant of Romulus. One is born a slave and tempts a Vestal virgin to break her vows. One becomes a mass murderer. And one becomes the heir of Julius Caesar. Linking the generations is a mysterious talisman as ancient as the city itself. Epic in every sense of the word, Roma is a panoramic historical saga and Saylor's finest achievement to date.

Rome, Pollution and Propriety

Dirt, Disease and Hygiene in the Eternal City from Antiquity to Modernity
Author: Mark Bradley
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139536575
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 2970

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Rome, Pollution and Propriety brings together scholars from a range of disciplines in order to examine the historical continuity of dirt, disease and hygiene in one environment, and to explore the development and transformation of these ideas alongside major chapters in the city's history, such as early Roman urban development, Roman pagan religion, the medieval Church, the Renaissance, the Unification of Italy and the advent of Fascism. This volume sets out to identify the defining characteristics, functions and discourses of pollution in Rome in such realms as disease and medicine, death and burial, sexuality and virginity, prostitution, purity and absolution, personal hygiene and morality, criminality, bodies and cleansing, waste disposal, decay, ruins and urban renovation, as well as studying the means by which that pollution was policed and controlled.

Virginity Revisited

Configurations of the Unpossessed Body
Author: Bonnie MacLachlan,Judith Fletcher
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 0802090133
Category: History
Page: 204
View: 2321

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From Classical Antiquity to the present, virginity has been closely allied with power: as someone who chooses a life of celibacy retains mastery over his or her body. Sexual potency withheld becomes an energy-reservoir that can ensure independence and enhance self-esteem, but it can also be harnessed by public institutions and redirected for the common good. This was the founding principle of the Vestal Virgins of Rome and later in the monastic orders of the middle ages. Mythical accounts of goddesses and heroines who possessed the ability to recover their virginity after sexual experience demonstrate a belief that virginity is paradoxically connected both with social autonomy and the ability to serve the human community. Virginity Revisited is a collection of essays that examines virginity not as a physical reality but as a cultural artefact. By situating the topic of virginity within a range of historical 'moments' and using a variety of methodologies, Virginity Revisited illuminates how chastity provided a certain agency, autonomy, and power to women. This is a study of the positive and negative features of sexual renunciation, from ancient Greek divinities and mythical women, in Rome's Vestal Virgins, in the Christian martyrs and Mariology in the Medieval and early Modern period, and in Grace Marks, the heroine of Margaret Atwood's novel Alias Grace.

Lives of the Romans


Author: Joanne Berry,Philip Matyszak
Publisher: Thames & Hudson
ISBN: 0500771707
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 6398

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One hundred biographies reveal the mightiest civilization of the ancient world through the lives of its citizens. At its peak Rome's empire stretched across Europe, Africa, and the Middle East, yet it started as a primitive encampment above a riverside marsh. This book spans the great chronological and geographical sweep of the Roman age and brings the reader face to face with those who helped create the empire, from consuls and commanders to ordinary soldiers, voters, and taxpayers. An extraordinary range of viewpoints is explored in these biographies. A centurion and a plasterer's wife share pages with the orator Cicero and the scholar Pliny the Elder, while a vestal virgin shares a chapter with Antinous, the boy-lover of Hadrian. Augustine, the church patriarch, and Constantine, Rome's first "Christian" emperor, rub shoulders with Julian the Apostate and Vettius Agorius Praetextatus, leader of the pagans. Roman women were the most liberated in the ancient world. They could wield massive power and influence, yet are often overlooked. Meet Servilia, Caesar's lover; Sulpicia, the teenage poet; Amazonia, the sword-swinging gladiator; and Cloelia, the girl who escaped captivity by swimming the Tiber. Lavishly illustrated with magnificent works of art, including portraits, sculptures, and Renaissance paintings of Roman scenes, this book reveals the real-life stories behind the rise and fall of Rome. Philip Matyszak teaches Roman History for the Institute of Continuing Education at Cambridge. He has written extensively on the ancient world. Joanne Berry teaches ancient history at Swansea University and is the author of The Complete Pompeii.

The Pagan Princess

A Story of the Greatest Career Women of Ancient Times the Vestal Virgins of Rome
Author: Virginia L. Montgomery
Publisher: Literary Licensing, LLC
ISBN: 9781258119942
Category:
Page: 244
View: 6807

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Twelve Against the Gods

The Story of Adventure
Author: William Bolitho
Publisher: Diversion Books
ISBN: 1635765048
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 2327

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"It's really quite good." - Elon Musk Twelve Against the Gods was an instant bestseller when it first published in 1929. In his trademark journalist style, author William Bolitho details the lives of twelve great adventurers—Alexander the Great, Casanova, Christopher Columbus, Mahomet, Lola Montez, Cagliostro (and Seraphina), Charles XII of Sweden, Napoleon I, Lucius Sergius Catiline, Napoleon III, Isadora Duncan, and Woodrow Wilson. Bolitho shines light on both the struggles and successes that made these figures so iconic, and demonstrates how they all battled convention and conformity to achieve enduring fame and notoriety. “We are born adventurers,” Bolitho writes, “and the love of adventures never leaves us till we are very old; old, timid men, in whose interest it is that adventure should quite die out. This is why all the poets are on one side, and all the laws on the other; for laws are made by, and usually for, old men." Though his essays are nearly one hundred years old, they encompass the timeless values of perseverance, bravery, and strength of spirit that have proven to resonate with the pioneers and thought leaders of today.

The Rape of Eve

The Transformation of Roman Ideology in Three Early Christian Retellings of Genesis
Author: Celene Lillie
Publisher: Fortress Press
ISBN: 1506414370
Category: Religion
Page: 208
View: 5396

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Sex, violence, power, and redemption. In recent decades, scholars of New Testament and early Christian traditions have given new attention to the relationships between gender and imperial power in the Roman world. In this surprising work, Celene Lillie examines core passages from three Gnostic texts from Nag Hammadi, On the Origin of the World, The Reality of the Rulers, and the Secret Revelation of John, in which Eve is portrayed as having been humiliated by the cosmic powers, yet experiencing restoration. Lillie compares that pattern with Gnostic savior motifs concerning Jesus and Seth, then sets it in the broader context of Roman cosmogonic myths at play in imperial ideology. The Nag Hammadi texts, she argues, offer us a window into symbolic forms of Christian resistance to imperial ideology. This groundbreaking study highlights the importance of the Nag Hammadi writings for our fuller appreciation of the currents of Christian response to the Roman Empire and the culture of rape pervasive within it.

The Great Fire of Rome

The Fall of the Emperor Nero and His City
Author: Stephen Dando-Collins
Publisher: Da Capo Press
ISBN: 0306819333
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 2557

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On the night of July 19, AD 64, a fire began beneath the stands of Rome's great stadium, the Circus Maximus. For more than a week the fire spread, engulfing most of the city and nearly burning it to the ground. With its capital in ruins, Rome's powerful empire teetered on the edge of collapse as Nero struggled desperately to save his empire…and his skin. In The Great Fire of Rome, Dando-Collins takes readers through the streets of ancient Rome, where unrest simmers, and into the imperial palace, where political intrigue seethes, relating a pot-boiler story filled with fascinating historical characters who will determine the course of an empire. It is an unforgettable human drama that brings ancient Rome and the momentous events of 64 AD scorchingly to life.

Caesar's Women


Author: Colleen McCullough
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0061582425
Category: Fiction
Page: 928
View: 7677

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New York Times bestselling author Colleen McCullough re-creates an extraordinary epoch before the mighty Republic belonged to Julius Caesar—when Rome's noblewomen were his greatest conquest. His victories were legend—in battle and bedchamber alike. Love was a political weapon he wielded cunningly and ruthlessly in his private war against enemies in the forum. Genius, general, patrician, Gaius Julius Caesar was history. His wives bought him influence. He sacrificed his beloved daughter on the altar of ambition. He burned for the cold-hearted mistress he could never dare trust. Caesar's women all knew—and feared—his power. He adored them, used them, destroyed them on his irresistible rise to prominence. And one of them would seal his fate.

Bodies, Borders, Believers

Ancient Texts and Present Conversations
Author: Anne Hege Grung,Marianne Bjelland Kartzow,Anna Rebecca Solevag
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1498279910
Category: Religion
Page: 472
View: 5874

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Frommer's Rome Past & Present


Author: Romolo Augusto Staccioli
Publisher: Frommers
ISBN: 9780764566103
Category: Travel
Page: 136
View: 4403

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A practical and unique guide, Rome Past Present appeals to the kid in all of us, with photographs of 18 of Rome's most important sites as they are today and illustrated acetate overlays showing each site in its heyday. In addition, a straight-forward text and additional photographs help bring the Eternal City to life.