Rome's Vestal Virgins


Author: Robin Lorsch Wildfang
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134151667
Category: History
Page: 176
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Comprehensive and thoroughly up-to-date, this volume offers a brand new analysis of the Vestal Virgins’ ritual function in Roman religion. Undertaking a detailed and careful analysis of ancient literary sources, Wildfang argues that the Vestals’ virginity must be understood on a variety of different levels and provides a solution to the problem of the Vestals’ peculiar legal status in ancient Rome. Addressing the one official state priesthood open to women at Rome, this volume explores and analyzes a range of topics including: the rituals enacted by priestesses (both the public rituals performed in connection with official state rites and festivals and the private rites associated only with the order itself) the division and interface between religion, state and family structure the Vestals’ participation in rights that were outside the sphere of traditional female activity. New and insightful, this investigation of one of the most important state cults in ancient Rome is an essential addition to the bookshelves of all those interested in Roman religion, history and culture.

Portraits of the Vestal Virgins, Priestesses of Ancient Rome


Author: Molly Lindner
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472118951
Category: Art
Page: 291
View: 4712

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Molly M. Lindner's new book examines the sculptural presentation of the Vestal Virgins, who, for more than eleven hundred years, dedicated their lives to the goddess Vesta, protector of the Roman state. Though supervised by a male priest, the Pontifex Maximus, they had privileges beyond those of most women; like Roman men, they dispensed favors and influence on behalf of their clients and relatives. The recovery of the Vestals' house, and statues of the priestesses, was an exciting moment in Roman archaeology. In 1883 Rodolfo Lanciani, Director of Antiquities for Rome, discovered the first Vestal statues. Newspapers were filled with details about the huge numbers of sculptures, inscriptions, jewelry, coins, and terracotta figures. Portraits of the Vestal Virgins, Priestesses of Ancient Rome investigates what images of long-dead women tell us about what was important to them. It addresses why portraits were made, and why their portraits—first set up in the late 1st or 2nd century CE—began to appear so much later than portraits of other nonimperial women and other Roman priestesses. The author sheds light on identifying a Vestal portrait among those of other priestesses, and considers why Vestal portraits do not copy each other's headdresses and hairstyles. Fourteen extensively illustrated chapters and a catalog of all known portraits help consider historical clues embedded in the hairstyles and facial features of the Vestals and other women of their day. What has appeared to be a mute collection of marble portraits has been given a voice through this book.

The Rape of Eve

The Transformation of Roman Ideology in Three Early Christian Retellings of Genesis
Author: Celene Lillie
Publisher: Fortress Press
ISBN: 1506414370
Category: Religion
Page: 208
View: 3586

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Sex, violence, power, and redemption. In recent decades, scholars of New Testament and early Christian traditions have given new attention to the relationships between gender and imperial power in the Roman world. In this surprising work, Celene Lillie examines core passages from three Gnostic texts from Nag Hammadi, On the Origin of the World, The Reality of the Rulers, and the Secret Revelation of John, in which Eve is portrayed as having been humiliated by the cosmic powers, yet experiencing restoration. Lillie compares that pattern with Gnostic savior motifs concerning Jesus and Seth, then sets it in the broader context of Roman cosmogonic myths at play in imperial ideology. The Nag Hammadi texts, she argues, offer us a window into symbolic forms of Christian resistance to imperial ideology. This groundbreaking study highlights the importance of the Nag Hammadi writings for our fuller appreciation of the currents of Christian response to the Roman Empire and the culture of rape pervasive within it.

From Good Goddess to Vestal Virgins

Sex and Category in Roman Religion
Author: Ariadne Staples
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113478788X
Category: History
Page: 217
View: 2286

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The role of women in Roman culture and society was a paradoxical one. On the one hand they enjoyed social, material and financial independence and on the other hand they were denied basic constitutional rights. Roman history is not short of powerful female figures, such as Agrippina and Livia, yet their power stemmed from their associations with great men and was not officially recognised. Ariadne Staples' book examines how women in Rome were perceived both by themselves and by men through women's participation in Roman religion, as Roman religious ritual provided the single public arena where women played a significant formal role. From Good Goddess to Vestal Virgins argues that the ritual roles played out by women were vital in defining them sexually and that these sexually defined categories spilled over into other aspects of Roman culture, including political activity. Ariadne Staples provides an arresting and original analysis of the role of women in Roman society, which challenges traditionally held views and provokes further questions.

Daughters of Hecate

Women and Magic in the Ancient World
Author: Kimberly B. Stratton,Dayna S. Kalleres
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190202149
Category: Body, Mind & Spirit
Page: 512
View: 3912

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Daughters of Hecate unites for the first time research on the problem of gender and magic in three ancient Mediterranean societies: early Judaism, Christianity, and Graeco-Roman culture. The book illuminates the gendering of ancient magic by approaching the topic from three distinct disciplinary perspectives: literary stereotyping, the social application of magic discourse, and material culture. The authors probe the foundations of, processes, and motivations behind gendered stereotypes, beginning with Western culture's earliest associations of women and magic in the Bible and Homer's Odyssey. Daughters of Hecate provides a nuanced exploration of the topic while avoiding reductive approaches. In fact, the essays in this volume uncover complexities and counter-discourses that challenge, rather than reaffirm, many gendered stereotypes taken for granted and reified by most modern scholarship. By combining critical theoretical methods with research into literary and material evidence, Daughters of Hecate interrogates a false association that has persisted from antiquity, to early modern witch hunts, to the present day.

Vestal Virgins, Sibyls, and Matrons

Women in Roman Religion
Author: Sarolta A. Takács
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292773578
Category: Religion
Page: 220
View: 888

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Roman women were the procreators and nurturers of life, both in the domestic world of the family and in the larger sphere of the state. Although deterred from participating in most aspects of public life, women played an essential role in public religious ceremonies, taking part in rituals designed to ensure the fecundity and success of the agricultural cycle on which Roman society depended. Thus religion is a key area for understanding the contributions of women to Roman society and their importance beyond their homes and families. In this book, Sarolta A. Takács offers a sweeping overview of Roman women's roles and functions in religion and, by extension, in Rome's history and culture from the republic through the empire. She begins with the religious calendar and the various festivals in which women played a significant role. She then examines major female deities and cults, including the Sibyl, Mater Magna, Isis, and the Vestal Virgins, to show how conservative Roman society adopted and integrated Greek culture into its mythic history, artistic expressions, and religion. Takács's discussion of the Bona Dea Festival of 62 BCE and of the Bacchantes, female worshippers of the god Bacchus or Dionysus, reveals how women could also jeopardize Rome's existence by stepping out of their assigned roles. Takács's examination of the provincial female flaminate and the Matres/Matronae demonstrates how women served to bind imperial Rome and its provinces into a cohesive society.

The Role of Vestal Virgins in Roman Civic Religion

A Structuralist Study of the Crimen Incesti
Author: Lindsay J. Thompson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 161
View: 3654

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This study introduces a question, somewhat disregarded or discounted in recent years, regarding the link between the Vestals and early Christian consecrated virgins. In a political interpretation of the ancient Roman virginity cult, this work demonstrates that female virginity was understood by both Christian and non-Christian Romans as a symbolic analogue of the securely intact body politic.

Ovid's 'Metamorphoses'

A Reader's Guide
Author: Genevieve Liveley
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1441136959
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 208
View: 5128

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Perhaps no other classical text has proved its versatility so much as Ovid's epic poem. A staple of undergraduate courses in Classical Studies, Latin, English and Comparative Literature, Metamorphoses is arguably one of the most important, canonical Latin texts and certainly among the most widely read and studied. Ovid's 'Metamorphoses': A Reader's Guide is the ideal companion to this epic classical text offering guidance on: • Literary, historical and cultural context • Key themes • Reading the text • Reception and influence • Further reading

Livia, Empress of Rome

A Biography
Author: Matthew Dennison
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 9781429989190
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 3496

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Rome is a subject of endless fascination, and in this new biography of the infamous Empress Livia, Matthew Dennison brings to life a woman long believed to be one of the most feared villainesses of history. Second wife of the emperor Augustus, mother of his successor Tiberius, grandmother of Claudius and great grandmother of Caligula, the empress Livia lived close to the center of Roman political power for eight turbulent decades. Her life spanned the years of Rome's transformation from Republic to Empire, and witnessed both its triumphs under the rule of Augustus and its lapse into instability under his dysfunctional successor. Livia was given the honorific title Augusta in her husband's will, and was posthumously deified by the emperor Claudius—but posterity would prove less respectful. The Roman historian Tacitus anathematized her as "malevolent" and a "feminine bully" and inspired Robert Graves's celebrated twentieth-century depiction of Livia in I, Claudius as the quintessence of the scheming matriarch, poisoning her relatives one by one to smooth her son's path to the imperial throne. Livia, Empress of Rome rescues the historical Livia from the crude caricature of popular myth to paint an elegant and richly textured portrait. In this rigorously researched biography, Dennison weighs the evidence found in contemporary sources to present a more nuanced assessment. Livia's true "crime," he reveals, was not murder but the exercise of power. The Livia who emerges here is a complex, courageous and gifted woman, and one of the most fascinating and perplexing figures of the ancient world.

Vestalinnenfeuer

Roman
Author: Sherri Smith
Publisher: Knaur eBook
ISBN: 3426406810
Category: Fiction
Page: 496
View: 2695

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Sinnlich, aufregend, geheimnisvoll! Rom im Jahre 63 v. Chr.: Eine der sechs Jungfrauen aus dem Tempel der Vesta ist gestorben, und ihre Nachfolgerin wird gesucht. Das Los fällt auf die sechsjährige Aemilia. Das Mädchen ist todunglücklich über diese angebliche Ehre, denn die nächsten dreißig Jahre wird sie im Tempel verbringen und der Göttin dienen, das Feuer hüten und keinen Kontakt mehr zu ihrer Familie haben. Männer sind tabu, doch dann lernt Aemilia den griechischen Sklaven Lysander kennen. Zwischen den beiden entbrennt eine verbotene Leidenschaft, die sie in tödliche Gefahr bringt... Vestalinnenfeuer von Sherri Smith: im eBook erhältlich!

The Vestal Virgin

Or, The Roman Ladies. A Tragedy
Author: Sir Robert Howard
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: 75
View: 7230

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Brides of Rome

A Novel of the Vestal Virgins
Author: Debra Macleod
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 9781514831687
Category:
Page: 280
View: 8501

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Their world was one of punishment, power and privilege. It was a world of war, secrets and sacred duty. It was the world of ancient Rome. And the esteemed Vestal Virgins - priestesses of Vesta, goddess of the home and hearth - protected the Eternal Flame that protected the Eternal City. Dedicated to a thirty-year vow of chaste service, Priestess Pomponia finds herself swept up in the intrigue, violence and bedroom politics of Rome's elite: Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, Octavian and his maneuvering wife Livia, all the while guarding the secret affection she has in her heart. But when a charge of incestum - a broken vow of chastity - is made against the Vestal order, the ultimate punishment looms: death, by being buried alive in the Evil Field. In BRIDES OF ROME, Debra May Macleod has re-created the world of ancient Rome with all its brutality and brilliance, all its rich history and even richer legend. A true page-turner that is as smart as it is compelling, this must-read novel brings the Vestal order to life like never before.

The Crimes of Elagabalus

The Life and Legacy of Rome's Decadent Boy Emperor
Author: Martijn Icks
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 1848853629
Category: Degeneration
Page: 276
View: 2420

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Elagablus, raised to the throne at the age of fourteen in 218 AD, and assassinated only four years later, remains among the most notorious and enigmatic of Roman Emperors. The contemporary and Byzantine sources on his reign portray a life of decadence and sexual and criminal excess, as well as religious affront to Rome's traditions. In this entertaining but scholarly read Martijn Icks treats the lurid contemporary stories alongside the emperor's afterlife in art and literature, seeking both to get at what may actually have happened in his reign and how his actions should be interpreted and at how they have resonated down the centuries. He takes a thematic approach, examining aspects of the reign and Elagabalus' otherness in turn, including his Syrian upbringing, his religious reforms and his reputation for decadence, whilst at the same time showing that religion aside, there is little from the non literary sources which actually marks out his reign as unusual.

Rome


Author: Amanda Claridge
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191501387
Category: Architecture
Page: 560
View: 6353

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The city of Rome is the largest archaeological site in the world, capital and showcase of the Roman Empire and the centre of Christian Europe. This guide provides: · Coverage of all the important sites in the city from 800 BC to AD 600 and the start of the early middle ages, drawing on the latest discoveries and the best of recent scholarship · Over 220 high-quality maps, site plans, diagrams and photographs · Sites divided into fourteen main areas, with star ratings to help you plan and prioritize your visit: Roman Forum; Upper Via Sacra; Palatine; Imperial Forums; Campus Martius; Capitoline Hill; Circus Flaminius to Circus Maximus; Colosseum and Esquiline hill; Caelian hill and the inner via Appia; Lateran to Porta Maggiore; Viminal hill; Pyramid to Testaccio; the outer via Appia; other outlying sites; Museums and Catacombs. · Introduction offering essential background to the history and culture of ancient Rome, placing the city in the context of the development of the empire, highlighting the nature of Roman achievement, and explaining how Rome came to be the largest city in the ancient world. · Comprehensive glossaries of Rome's building materials, techniques and building types, a chronological table of kings, emperors, and the early popes, information about opening times, references and suggestions for further reading and a detailed user-friendly index. For this new edition the original text has been extensively revised, adding over 20 more sites and illustrations, the itineraries have been re-organized and expanded to suit the many changes that have taken place in the past decade, and the practical information and references have been fully updated.

The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Mediterranean Religions


Author: Barbette Stanley Spaeth
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107511534
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 6045

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In antiquity, the Mediterranean region was linked by sea and land routes that facilitated the spread of religious beliefs and practices among the civilizations of the ancient world. The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Mediterranean Religions provides an introduction to the major religions of this area and explores current research regarding the similarities and differences among them. The period covered is from the prehistoric period to late antiquity, that is, ca.4000 BCE to 600 CE. The first nine essays in the volume provide an overview of the characteristics and historical developments of the major religions of the region, including those of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Syria-Canaan, Israel, Anatolia, Iran, Greece, Rome and early Christianity. The last five essays deal with key topics in current research on these religions, including violence, identity, the body, gender and visuality, taking an explicitly comparative approach and presenting recent theoretical and methodological advances in contemporary scholarship.

Antony and Cleopatra


Author: Adrian Goldsworthy
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0297858661
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 352
View: 2123

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The epic story of one of the most famous love affairs in history, by the bestselling author of Caesar. ***** The monumental love affair between Antony and Cleopatra has been depicted in countless novels, plays and films. As one of the three men in control of the Roman Empire, Antony was perhaps the most powerful man of his day. And Cleopatra, who had already been Julius Caesar's lover, was the beautiful queen of Egypt, Rome's most important province. The clash of cultures, the power politics, and the personal passion have proven irresistible to storytellers. But in the course of this storytelling dozens of myths have grown up. The popular image of Cleopatra in ancient Egyptian costume is a fallacy; she was actually Greek. Despite her local dominance in Egypt, her real power came from her ability to forge strong personal allegiances with the most important men in Rome. Likewise, Mark Antony was not the bluff soldier of legend, brought low by his love for an exotic woman - he was first and foremost a politician, and never allowed Cleopatra to dictate policy to him. In this history, based exclusively on ancient sources and archaeological evidence, Adrian Goldsworthy gives us the facts behind this famous couple and dispels many myths. 'Excellent' Tom Holland 'Refreshingly frank' Mary Beard

Roman Women


Author: Augusto Fraschetti,Linda Lappin
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226260945
Category: History
Page: 249
View: 4624

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This collection of essays features important Roman women who were active in politics, theater, cultural life, and religion from the first through the fourth centuries. The contributors draw on rare documents in an attempt to reconstruct in detail the lives and accomplishments of these exceptional women, a difficult task considering that the Romans recorded very little about women. They thought it improper for a woman's virtues to be praised outside the home. Moreover, they believed that a feeble intellect, a weakness in character, and a general incompetence prevented a woman from participating in public life. Through this investigation, we encounter a number of idiosyncratic personalities. They include the vestal virgin Claudia; Cornelia, a matron; the passionate Fulvia; a mime known as "Lycoris"; the politician Livia; the martyr and writer Vibia Perpetua; a hostess named Helena Augusta; the intellectual Hypatia; and the saint Melania the Younger. Unlike their silent female counterparts, these women stood out in a culture where it was terribly difficult and odd to do so.