Roman Law in Context


Author: David Johnston
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139425803
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 4871

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Roman Law in Context explains how Roman law worked for those who lived by it, by viewing it in the light of the society and economy in which it operated. The book discusses three main areas of Roman law and life: the family and inheritance; property and the use of land; commercial transactions and the management of businesses. It also deals with the question of litigation and how readily the Roman citizen could assert his or her legal rights in practice. In addition it provides an introduction to using the main sources of Roman law. The book ends with an epilogue discussing the role of Roman law in medieval and modern Europe, a bibliographical essay, and a glossary of legal terms. The book involves the minimum of legal technicality and is intended to be accessible to students and teachers of Roman history as well as interested general readers.

Public Order in Ancient Rome


Author: Wilfried Nippel
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521387491
Category: History
Page: 163
View: 7467

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The absence of a professional police force in the city of Rome in classical times is often identified as a major cause of the collapse of the Republic. But this alleged "structural weakness" was not removed by the Emperor Augustus and his successors, and was in fact shared with other premodern states. In this critical new study of the system of law and order in ancient Rome in both the republican and imperial periods, Wilfried Nippel identifies the mechanisms of self-regulation that operated as a stabilizing force within Roman society.

Roman Law and the Legal World of the Romans


Author: Andrew M. Riggsby
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 052168711X
Category: History
Page: 283
View: 8527

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In this book, Andrew Riggsby surveys the main areas of Roman law, and their place in Roman life.

Borkowski's Textbook on Roman Law


Author: Paul du Plessis
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198736223
Category: Law
Page: 440
View: 2452

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Borkowski's Textbook on Roman Law is the leading textbook in the field of Roman law, and has been written with undergraduate students firmly in mind. The book provides an accessible and highly engaging account of Roman private law and civil procedure, with coverage of all key topics, including the Roman legal system, and the law of persons, property, and obligations. The author sets the law in its social and historical context, and demonstrates the impact of Roman law on our modern legal systems. For the fifth edition, Paul du Plessis has included references to a wide range of scholarly texts, to ground his judicious account of Roman law firmly in contemporary scholarship. He has also added examples from legal practice, as well as truncated timelines at the start of each chapter to illustrate how the law developed over time. The book contains a wealth of learning features, including chapter summaries, diagrams and maps. A major feature of the book is the inclusion throughout of extracts in translation from the most important sources of Roman law: the Digest and the Institutes of Justinian. Annotated further reading sections at the end of each chapter act as a guide to further enquiry. Online Resource Centre The book is accompanied by an extensive Online Resource Centre, containing the following resources: -Self-test multiple choice questions -Interactive timeline -Biographies of key figures -Glossary of Latin terms -Annotated web links -Original Latin versions of the extracts from the Digest and the Institutes of Justinian -Examples of textual analysis of Roman law texts -Guide to the literature and sources of Roman law

Crime and Punishment in Ancient Rome


Author: Richard A. Bauman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134823932
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 7283

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First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Rise of the Roman Jurists

Studies in Cicero's "Pro Caecina"
Author: Bruce W. Frier
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400854903
Category: Political Science
Page: 344
View: 824

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Combining historical, sociological, and legal expertise, Bruce Frier discloses the reasons for the emergence of law as a professional discipline in the later Roman Republic. Originally published in 1985. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Violence in Roman Egypt

A Study in Legal Interpretation
Author: Ari Z. Bryen
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812208218
Category: History
Page: 376
View: 1008

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What can we learn about the world of an ancient empire from the ways that people complain when they feel that they have been violated? What role did law play in people's lives? And what did they expect their government to do for them when they felt harmed and helpless? If ancient historians have frequently written about nonelite people as if they were undifferentiated and interchangeable, Ari Z. Bryen counters by drawing on one of our few sources of personal narratives from the Roman world: over a hundred papyrus petitions, submitted to local and imperial officials, in which individuals from the Egyptian countryside sought redress for acts of violence committed against them. By assembling these long-neglected materials (also translated as an appendix to the book) and putting them in conversation with contemporary perspectives from legal anthropology and social theory, Bryen shows how legal stories were used to work out relations of deference within local communities. Rather than a simple force of imperial power, an open legal system allowed petitioners to define their relationships with their local adversaries while contributing to the body of rules and expectations by which they would live in the future. In so doing, these Egyptian petitioners contributed to the creation of Roman imperial order more generally.

Law and Life of Rome


Author: John Anthony Crook
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801492730
Category: History
Page: 349
View: 9002

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It is about Roman law in its social context, an attempt to strengthen the bridge between two spheres of discourse about ancient Rome by using the institutions of the law to enlarge understanding of the society and bringing the evidence of the social and economic facts to bear on the rules of law.

The Constitution of the Roman Republic


Author: Andrew Lintott
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 9780191584671
Category: History
Page: 310
View: 6135

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There is no other published book in English studying the constitution of the Roman Republic as a whole. Yet the Greek historian Polybius believed that the constitution was a fundamental cause of the exponential growth of Rome's empire. He regarded the Republic as unusual in two respects: first, because it functioned so well despite being a mix of monarchy, oligarchy and democracy; secondly, because the constitution was the product of natural evolution rather than the ideals of a lawgiver. Even if historians now seek more widely for the causes of Rome's rise to power, the importance and influence of her political institutions remains. The reasons for Rome's power are both complex, on account of the mix of elements, and flexible, inasmuch as they were not founded on written statutes but on unwritten traditions reinterpreted by successive generations. Knowledge of Rome's political institutions is essential both for ancient historians and for those who study the contribution of Rome to the republican tradition of political thought from the Middle Ages to the revolutions inspired by the Enlightenment.

The Cambridge Companion to Roman Law


Author: David Johnston
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521895642
Category: History
Page: 552
View: 2628

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This book reflects the wide range of current scholarship on Roman law, covering private, criminal and public law.

Ancient Greek and Roman Slavery


Author: Peter Hunt
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119421063
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 264
View: 3395

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An exciting study of ancient slavery in Greece and Rome This book provides an introduction to pivotal issues in the study of classical (Greek and Roman) slavery. The span of topics is broad—ranging from everyday resistance to slavery to philosophical justifications of slavery, and from the process of enslavement to the decline of slavery after the fall of the Western Roman Empire. The book uses a wide spectrum of types of evidence, and relies on concrete and vivid examples whenever possible. Introductory chapters provide historical context and a clear and concise discussion of the methodological difficulties of studying ancient slavery. The following chapters are organized around central topics in slave studies: enslavement, economics, politics, culture, sex and family life, manumission and ex-slaves, everyday conflict, revolts, representations, philosophy and law, and decline and legacy. Chapters open with general discussions of important scholarly controversies and the challenges of our ancient evidence, and case studies from the classical Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman periods provide detailed and concrete explorations of the issues. Organized by key themes in slave studies with in-depth classical case studies Emphasizes Greek/Roman comparisons and contrasts Features helpful customized maps Topics range from demography to philosophy, from Linear B through the fall of the empire in the west Features myriad types of evidence: literary, historical, legal and philosophical texts, the bible, papyri, epitaphs, lead letters, curse tablets, art, manumission inscriptions, and more Ancient Greek and Roman Slavery provides a general survey of classical slavery and is particularly appropriate for college courses on Greek and Roman slavery, on comparative slave societies, and on ancient social history. It will also be of great interest to history enthusiasts and scholars, especially those interested in slavery in different periods and societies.

The Cambridge History of Greek and Roman Political Thought


Author: Christopher Rowe
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521481366
Category: Philosophy
Page: 745
View: 5245

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This volume is the first general and comprehensive treatment of the political thought of ancient Greece and Rome ever to be published in English. It covers Plato and Aristotle at length, but also a host of other major and minor thinkers, from Thucydides and the Greek dramatists to Cicero and early Christian writers. It attempts both historical and philosophical assessment of the writers discussed and quotes them generously in translation. It will take its place as a standard work essential for scholars and students of classics, history, philosophy and theology.

The Roman Law of Obligations


Author: Peter Birks,Eric Descheemaeker
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198719272
Category: Law
Page: 303
View: 5914

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This volume contains Birks' notes on a series of lectures on the Roman law of obligations delivered in 1982. They give a comprehensive insight into his views on the topic, which are relevant in both a Roman context and also from a modern English perspective. The book examines, in turn, the law of contracts with its general principles and rule applications to the transactions mentioned in the Institutes; the law of delicts; and finally the miscellany of residual obligations from which the later categories of quasi-contracts and quasi-delicts, but also the modern law of unjust enrichment, emerged.

Death-Ritual and Social Structure in Classical Antiquity


Author: Ian Morris
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521376112
Category: History
Page: 264
View: 7928

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The chief purpose of this book is to show how burials may be used as a uniquely informative source for Greek and Roman social history. Burials permit a far wider range of inference and insight than the literary texts produced by and for a narrow social elite, and by studying them in depth Dr. Morris is able to offer new interpretations of social change in Graeco-Roman antiquity. The major interdisciplinary importance of the book lies in its attempt to break down barriers between archaeologists and historians of different societies and cultures.

Cicero's Law

Rethinking Roman Law of the Late Republic
Author: Paul J. du Plessis
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 1474408842
Category: Law
Page: 256
View: 462

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This volume brings together an international team of scholars to debate Cicero's role in the narrative of Roman law in the late Republic - a role that has been minimised or overlooked in previous scholarship. This reflects current research that opens a larger and more complex debate about the nature of law and of the legal profession in the last century of the Roman Republic.

The Ancient Jews from Alexander to Muhammad


Author: Seth Schwartz
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139952552
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 674

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This is an accessible and up-to-date account of the Jews during the millennium following Alexander the Great's conquest of the East. Unusually, it acknowledges the problems involved in constructing a narrative from fragmentary yet complex evidence and is, implicitly, an exploration of how this might be accomplished. Moreover, unlike most other introductions to the subject, it concentrates primarily on the people rather than issues of theology and adopts a resolutely unsentimental approach to the subject. Professor Schwartz particularly demonstrates the importance of studying Jewish history, texts and artefacts to the broader community of ancient historians because of what they can contribute to wider themes such as Roman imperialism. The book serves as an excellent introduction for students and scholars of Jewish history and of ancient history.

The Oxford Handbook of Roman Law and Society


Author: Clifford Ando,Paul J du Plessis,Kaius Tuori
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0191044423
Category: History
Page: 650
View: 8109

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The Handbook is intended to survey the landscape of contemporary research and chart principal directions of future inquiry. Its aim is to bring to bear upon Roman legal study the full range of intellectual resources of contemporary legal history, from comparison to popular constitutionalism, from international private law to law and society. This unique contribution of the volumesets it apart from others in the field. Furthermore, the volume brings the study of Roman law into closer alignment, and thus into dialogue, with historical, sociological, and anthropological research in law in other periods. The volume is therefore directed not simply to ancient historians and legal historians already focused on the ancient world, but to historians of all periods interested in law and its complex and multifaceted relationship to society.

Policing the Roman Empire

Soldiers, Administration, and Public Order
Author: Christopher J. Fuhrmann
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: 0199737843
Category: History
Page: 330
View: 4460

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Drawing on a wide variety of source material from art archaeology, administrative documents, Egyptian papyri, laws Jewish and Christian religious texts and ancient narratives this book provides a comprehensive overview of Roman imperial policing practices.

The Ancient City


Author: Arjan Zuiderhoek
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316683974
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 9356

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Greece and Rome were quintessentially urban societies. Ancient culture, politics and society arose and developed in the context of the polis and the civitas. In modern scholarship, the ancient city has been the subject of intense debates due to the strong association in Western thought between urbanism, capitalism and modernity. In this book, Arjan Zuiderhoek provides a survey of the main issues at stake in these debates, as well as a sketch of the chief characteristics of Greek and Roman cities. He argues that the ancient Greco-Roman city was indeed a highly specific form of urbanism, but that this does not imply that the ancient city was somehow 'superior' or 'inferior' to forms of urbanism in other societies, just (interestingly) different. The book is aimed primarily at students of ancient history and general readers, but also at scholars working on urbanism in other periods and places.

New Frontiers


Author: Paul J du Plessis
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748668195
Category: Law
Page: 256
View: 1297

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An interdisciplinary, edited collection on social science methodologies for approaching Roman legal sources. Roman law as a field of study is rapidly evolving to reflect new perspectives and approaches in research. Scholars who work on the subject are i