The Rise of Christianity

A Sociologist Reconsiders History
Author: Rodney Stark
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691027494
Category: Religion
Page: 246
View: 6168

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Rodney Stark, a sociologist by training, has written a book that should end much of the Christian-bashing occuring in academia. Stark demonstrates that Christianity became popular very quickly because it offered its adherents a better faith than competing religions and treated those believers better both physically and spiritually.

Indonesia

The Rise of Capital
Author: Richard Robison
Publisher: Equinox Publishing
ISBN: 9789793780658
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 425
View: 1120

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Studies of Indonesian politics have long focused upon the military and the bureaucracy because it is within these institutions that formal power is located, not the parties, unions, chambers of commerce or corporations. However, such an approach can neglect the powerful influences exerted upon the state by social and economic forces. This important and controversial new book examines the way in which one of these forces, capital, has emerged in the past two decades as a major influence upon the state, its officials and policies. The emergence of the capitalist class is examined, along with its internal divisions and conflicts and its relations with the state. In particular, attention is given to the fusion of the ruling strata of state officials and the capitalist class the potential basis for a new ruling class. This is set against the weakness of capital caused by its division into domestic and international, state and private, Chinese and indigenous. These factors are in turn set in the context of international influences the rise and fall of the oil boom, the activities of the IBRD and IMF, the decline of export earnings and the fiscal difficulties of the state. Since its original publication in 1986, Indonesia: The Rise of Capital has been the best selling academic book on Indonesian politics and the most cited in the SSCI and Google Scholar citation indexes. About the Author At the time of this publication in 1986, Richard Robison was Senior Lecturer in the Asian Studies Program at Murdoch University. He is now Emeritus Professor at Murdoch University and has been Professor of Political Economy at the International Institute of Social Studies in The Hague (2003 2006) and Professor and Director of the Australian Research Council s Special Centre for Research on Political and Social Change in Contemporary Asia (1995 1999). He is the author, editor of 14 books and has published in major international journals, including World Politics, World Development, Pacific Review, New Political Economy and the Journal of Development Studies. Professor Robison has been awarded Senior research fellowships from the Fulbright Foundation and the Leverhulme Trust."

Rise And Fall Of The Third Reich

A History of Nazi Germany
Author: William L. Shirer
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0671728687
Category: History
Page: 1264
View: 1726

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The classic history of Adolph Hitler's rise to power and his dramatic defeat

The Rise and Fall of Ancient Egypt


Author: Toby Wilkinson
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1408810026
Category: History
Page: 672
View: 6144

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A brilliantly readable, beautifully illustrated general history of ancient Egypt, from the builders of the first pyramids to Cleopatra

Last Call

The Rise and Fall of Prohibition
Author: Daniel Okrent
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781439171691
Category: History
Page: 480
View: 1730

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A brilliant, authoritative, and fascinating history of America’s most puzzling era, the years 1920 to 1933, when the U.S. Constitution was amended to restrict one of America’s favorite pastimes: drinking alcoholic beverages. From its start, America has been awash in drink. The sailing vessel that brought John Winthrop to the shores of the New World in 1630 carried more beer than water. By the 1820s, liquor flowed so plentifully it was cheaper than tea. That Americans would ever agree to relinquish their booze was as improbable as it was astonishing. Yet we did, and Last Call is Daniel Okrent’s dazzling explanation of why we did it, what life under Prohibition was like, and how such an unprecedented degree of government interference in the private lives of Americans changed the country forever. Writing with both wit and historical acuity, Okrent reveals how Prohibition marked a confluence of diverse forces: the growing political power of the women’s suffrage movement, which allied itself with the antiliquor campaign; the fear of small-town, native-stock Protestants that they were losing control of their country to the immigrants of the large cities; the anti-German sentiment stoked by World War I; and a variety of other unlikely factors, ranging from the rise of the automobile to the advent of the income tax. Through it all, Americans kept drinking, going to remarkably creative lengths to smuggle, sell, conceal, and convivially (and sometimes fatally) imbibe their favorite intoxicants. Last Call is peopled with vivid characters of an astonishing variety: Susan B. Anthony and Billy Sunday, William Jennings Bryan and bootlegger Sam Bronfman, Pierre S. du Pont and H. L. Mencken, Meyer Lansky and the incredible—if long-forgotten—federal official Mabel Walker Willebrandt, who throughout the twenties was the most powerful woman in the country. (Perhaps most surprising of all is Okrent’s account of Joseph P. Kennedy’s legendary, and long-misunderstood, role in the liquor business.) It’s a book rich with stories from nearly all parts of the country. Okrent’s narrative runs through smoky Manhattan speakeasies, where relations between the sexes were changed forever; California vineyards busily producing “sacramental” wine; New England fishing communities that gave up fishing for the more lucrative rum-running business; and in Washington, the halls of Congress itself, where politicians who had voted for Prohibition drank openly and without apology. Last Call is capacious, meticulous, and thrillingly told. It stands as the most complete history of Prohibition ever written and confirms Daniel Okrent’s rank as a major American writer.

The Rise of the Network Society


Author: Manuel Castells
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444356313
Category: Social Science
Page: 656
View: 9573

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This first book in Castells' groundbreaking trilogy, with a substantial new preface, highlights the economic and social dynamics of the information age and shows how the network society has now fully risen on a global scale. Groundbreaking volume on the impact of the age of information on all aspects of society Includes coverage of the influence of the internet and the net-economy Describes the accelerating pace of innovation and social transformation Based on research in the USA, Asia, Latin America, and Europe

The Rise of Political Anti-semitism in Germany & Austria


Author: Peter G. J. Pulzer
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674771666
Category: History
Page: 357
View: 6796

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To understand the twentieth century, we must know the nineteenth. It was then that an ancient prejudice was forged into a modern political weapon. How and why this happened is shown in this classic study by Peter Pulzer, first published in 1964 and now reprinted with a new introduction by the author.

The Fall and Rise of Jerusalem

Judah Under Babylonian Rule
Author: Oded Lipschitz
Publisher: Eisenbrauns
ISBN: 1575060957
Category: History
Page: 474
View: 6339

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The period of the demise of the kingdom of Judah at the end of the 6th century B.C.E., the fall of Jerusalem to the Babylonians, the exile of the elite to Babylon, and the reshaping of the territory of the new province of Judah, culminating at the end of the century with the first return of exiles--all have been subjects of intense scrutiny during the last decade. Lipschits takes into account the biblical textual evidence, the results of archaeological research, and the reports of Babylonian and Egyptian sources and provides a comprehensive survey and analysis of the evidence for the history of this 100-year-long era. He provides a lucid historical survey that will, no doubt, become the baseline for all future studies of this era.

The Rise of Anthropological Theory

A History of Theories of Culture
Author: Marvin Harris
Publisher: Rowman Altamira
ISBN: 9780759101333
Category: Social Science
Page: 806
View: 3391

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The best known, most often cited history of anthropological theory is finally available in paperback! First published in 1968, Harris's book has been cited in over 1,000 works and is one of the key documents explaining cultural materialism, the theory associated with Harris's work. This updated edition included the complete 1968 text plus a new introduction by Maxine Margolis, which discusses the impact of the book and highlights some of the major trends in anthropological theory since its original publication. RAT, as it is affectionately known to three decades of graduate students, comprehensively traces the history of anthropology and anthropological theory, culminating in a strong argument for the use of a scientific, behaviorally-based, etic approach to the understanding of human culture known as cultural materialism. Despite its popularity and influence on anthropological thinking, RAT has never been available in paperback_until now. It is an essential volume for the library of all anthropologists, their graduate students, and other theorists in the social sciences.

The Rise and Fall of the White Republic

Class Politics and Mass Culture in Nineteenth-century America
Author: Alexander Saxton
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 9781859844670
Category: History
Page: 397
View: 7876

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Saxton asks why white racism remained an ideological force in America long after the need to justify slavery and Western conquest had disappeared.

The Rise of Western Power

A Comparative History of Western Civilization
Author: Jonathan Daly
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1441118519
Category: History
Page: 464
View: 5717

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The West's history is one of extraordinary success; no other region, empire, culture, or civilization has left so powerful a mark upon the world. The Rise of Western Power charts the West's achievements-representative government, the free enterprise system, modern science, and the rule of law-as well as its misdeeds-two frighteningly destructive World Wars, the Holocaust, imperialistic domination, and the Atlantic slave trade. Adopting a global perspective, Jonathan Daly explores the contributions of other cultures and civilizations to the West's emergence. Historical, geographical, and cultural factors all unfold in the narrative. Adopting a thematic structure, the book traces the rise of Western power through a series of revolutions-social, political, technological, military, commercial, and industrial, among others. The result is a clear and engaging introduction to the history of Western civilization.

The Rise of the Meritocracy


Author: Michael Young
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 9781412815727
Category: Social Science
Page: 180
View: 3009

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Michael Young has christened the oligarchy of the future “Meritocracy.” Indeed, the word is now part of the English language. It would appear that the formula: IQ+Effort=Merit may well constitute the basic belief of the ruling class in the twenty-first century. Projecting himself into the year 2034, the author of this sociological satire shows how present decisions and practices may remold our society. It is widespread knowledge that it is insufficient to be somebody's nephew to obtain a responsible post in business, government, teaching, or science. Experts in education and selection apply scientific principles to sift out the leaders of tomorrow. You need intelligence rating, qualification, experience, application, and a certain caliber to achieve status. In a word, one must show merit to advance in the new society of tomorrow. In a new opening essay, Young reflects on the reception of his work, and its production, in a candid and lively way. Many of the critical ambiguities surrounding its original publication are now clarified and resolved. What we have is what the Guardian of London called “A brilliant essay.” and what Time and Tide described as “a fountain gush of new ideas. Its wit and style make it compulsively enjoyable reading from cover to cover.”

Rise and Kill First

The Secret History of Israel's Targeted Assassinations
Author: Ronen Bergman
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0679604685
Category: History
Page: 784
View: 8669

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The first definitive history of the Mossad, Shin Bet, and the IDF’s targeted killing programs, hailed by The New York Times as “an exceptional work, a humane book about an incendiary subject.” WINNER OF THE NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD IN HISTORY NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY JENNIFER SZALAI, THE NEW YORK TIMES NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Economist • The New York Times Book Review • BBC History Magazine • Mother Jones • Kirkus Reviews The Talmud says: “If someone comes to kill you, rise up and kill him first.” This instinct to take every measure, even the most aggressive, to defend the Jewish people is hardwired into Israel’s DNA. From the very beginning of its statehood in 1948, protecting the nation from harm has been the responsibility of its intelligence community and armed services, and there is one weapon in their vast arsenal that they have relied upon to thwart the most serious threats: Targeted assassinations have been used countless times, on enemies large and small, sometimes in response to attacks against the Israeli people and sometimes preemptively. In this page-turning, eye-opening book, journalist and military analyst Ronen Bergman—praised by David Remnick as “arguably [Israel’s] best investigative reporter”—offers a riveting inside account of the targeted killing programs: their successes, their failures, and the moral and political price exacted on the men and women who approved and carried out the missions. Bergman has gained the exceedingly rare cooperation of many current and former members of the Israeli government, including Prime Ministers Shimon Peres, Ehud Barak, Ariel Sharon, and Benjamin Netanyahu, as well as high-level figures in the country’s military and intelligence services: the IDF (Israel Defense Forces), the Mossad (the world’s most feared intelligence agency), Caesarea (a “Mossad within the Mossad” that carries out attacks on the highest-value targets), and the Shin Bet (an internal security service that implemented the largest targeted assassination campaign ever, in order to stop what had once appeared to be unstoppable: suicide terrorism). Including never-before-reported, behind-the-curtain accounts of key operations, and based on hundreds of on-the-record interviews and thousands of files to which Bergman has gotten exclusive access over his decades of reporting, Rise and Kill First brings us deep into the heart of Israel’s most secret activities. Bergman traces, from statehood to the present, the gripping events and thorny ethical questions underlying Israel’s targeted killing campaign, which has shaped the Israeli nation, the Middle East, and the entire world. “A remarkable feat of fearless and responsible reporting . . . important, timely, and informative.”—John le Carré

The Rise of Commercial Empires

England and the Netherlands in the Age of Mercantilism, 1650-1770
Author: David Ormrod
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521819268
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 400
View: 9723

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A work of major importance for the economic history of both Europe and North America.

The Rise of the Novel


Author: Ian Watt
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520230699
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 339
View: 5605

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Praise for the new (2001) edition: "Ian Watt's The Rise of the Novel still seems to me far and away the best book ever written on the early English novel—wise, humane, beautifully organized and expressed, one of the absolutely indispensable critical works in modern literary scholarship. And W. B. Carnochan's brilliant introduction does a wonderful job of showing how Watt's book came into being and changed for good the way the novel in general is taught and understood."—Max Byrd, author of Grant: A Novel "Ian Watt's The Rise of the Novel remains the single indispensable, absolutely essential book for students of the 18th-century novel."—John Richetti, author of The English Novel in History: 1700-1780 Praise for the original edition: "A remarkable book. . . . A pioneer work in the application of modern sociology to literature."—Manchester Guardian "An outstanding contribution to the field of historical sociology and the sociology of knowledge. . . . The author has set the 'rise of the novel' as a new literary genre in the social context of eighteenth-century England, with emphasis on the predominant middle-class features of the period."—American Journal of Sociology

Christianization and the Rise of Christian Monarchy

Scandinavia, Central Europe and Rus' c.900–1200
Author: Nora Berend
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139468367
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 8843

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This 2007 text is a comparative, analysis of one of the most fundamental stages in the formation of Europe. Leading scholars explore the role of the spread of Christianity and the formation of new principalities in the birth of Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Bohemia, Hungary, Poland and Rus' around the year 1000. Drawing on history, archaeology and art history, and emphasizing problems related to the sources and historiographical debates, they demonstrate the complex interdependence between the processes of religious and political change, covering conditions prior to the introduction of Christianity, the adoption of Christianity, and the development of the rulers' power. Regional patterns emerge, highlighting both the similarities in ruler-sponsored cases of Christianization, and differences in the consolidation of power and in institutions introduced by Christianity. The essays reveal how local societies adopted Christianity; medieval ideas of what constituted the dividing line between Christians and non-Christians; and the connections between Christianity and power.

The Rise of Respectable Society

A Social History of Victorian Britain, 1830-1900
Author: Francis Michael Longstreth Thompson
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674772854
Category: History
Page: 382
View: 8035

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One of England's grand masters of history provides a clear and persuasive interpretation of the creation of "respectable society" in Victorian Britain. Integrating a vast amount of research previously hidden in obscure or academic journals, he covers not only the economy, social structure, and patterns of authority, but also marriage and the family, childhood, homes and houses, work and play. By 1900 the structure of British society had become more orderly and well-defined than it had been in the 1830s and 1840s, but the result, Thompson shows, was fragmentation into a multiplicity of sections or classes with differing standards and notions of respectability. Each group operated its own social controls, based on what it considered acceptable or unacceptable conduct. This "internalized and diversified" respectability was not the cohesive force its middle-class and evangelical proponents had envisioned. The Victorian experience thus bequeathed structural problems, identity problems, and authority problems to the twentieth century, with which Britain is grappling.

The Rise of the Western World

A New Economic History
Author: Douglass C. North,Robert Paul Thomas
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521290999
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 170
View: 8037

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First published in 1973, this is a radical interpretation, offering a unified explanation for the growth of Western Europe between 900 A. D. and 1700, providing a general theoretical framework for institutional change geared to the general reader.

The Rise of the Fiscal State in Europe c.1200-1815


Author: Richard Bonney
Publisher: Clarendon Press
ISBN: 9780191542206
Category: History
Page: 540
View: 2948

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In this volume an international team of scholars builds up a comprehensive analysis of the fiscal history of Europe over six centuries. It forms a fundamental starting-point for an understanding of the distinctiveness of the emerging European states, and highlights the issue of fiscal power as an essential prerequisite for the development of the modern state. The study underlines the importance of technical developments by the state, its capacity to innovate, and, however imperfect the techniques, the greater detail and sophistication of accounting practice towards the end of the period. New taxes had been developed, new wealth had been tapped, new mechanisms of enforcement had been established. In general, these developments were made in western Europe; the lack of progress in some fiscal systems, especially those in eastern Europe, is an issue of historical importance in its own right and lends particular significance to the chapters on Poland and Russia. By the eighteenth century `mountains of debt' and high debt-revenue ratios had become the norm in western Europe, yet in the east only Russia was able to adapt to the western model by 1815. The capacity of governments to borrow, and the interaction of the constraints on borrowing and the power to tax had become the real test of the fiscal powers of the `modern state' by 1800-15.