Research Methods for Creating and Curating Data in the Digital Humanities


Author: Matt Hayler
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 1474409679
Category: Computers
Page: 256
View: 5600

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As all scholars increasingly use digital tools to support their research, and every internet user becomes used to data being available, elucidating, and engaging, the creative aspects of Digital Humanities work are coming under increasing scrutiny. This volume explores the practice of making new tools, new images, new collections, and new artworks in an academic environment, detailing who needs to be involved and what their roles might be, and how they come together to produce knowledge as a collective. The chapters presented here demonstrate that creation is never neutral with political and theoretical concerns intentionally or unavoidably always being written into the fabric of what is being made, even if that's the seeming neatness of computer code. In presenting their own creative research, the writers in this volume offer examples of practice that will be of use to anyone interested in learning more about contemporary Digital Humanities scholarship and its implications.

Research Methods for Reading Digital Data in the Digital Humanities


Author: Gabriele Griffin
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 1474409628
Category: Reference
Page: 256
View: 4935

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The first volume to introduce the techniques and methods of reading digital material for researchDigital Humanities has become one of the new domains of academe at the interface of technological development, epistemological change, and methodological concerns. This volume explores how digital material might be read or utilized in research, whether that material is digitally born as fanfiction, for example, mostly is, or transposed from other sources. The volume asks questions such as what happens when text is transformed from printed into digital matter, and how that impacts on the methods we bring to bear on exploring that technologized matter, for example in the case of digital editions. Issues such as how to analyse visual material in digital archives or Twitter feeds, how to engage in data mining, what it means to undertake crowd-sourcing, big data, and what digital network analyses can tell us about online interactions are dealt with. This will give Humanities researchers ideas for doing digitally based research and also suggest ways of engaging with new digital research methods. Key featuresFirst volume centred on the navigation and interpretation of digital material as research methods in the HumanitiesUp-to-date analyses of issues and methods including big data, crowdsourcing, digital network analysis, working with digital additionsBased on actual research projects such as para-textual work with fanfiction, reading twitter, different kinds of distant and close readings

Digital Humanities in the Library

Challenges and Opportunities for Subject Specialists
Author: Arianne Hartsell-Gundy,Liorah Golomb
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780838987674
Category: Academic librarians
Page: 287
View: 880

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In the past decade there has been an intense growth in the number of library publishing services supporting faculty and students. Unified by a commitment to both access and service, library publishing programs have grown from an early focus on backlist digitization to encompass publication of student works, textbooks, research data, as well as books and journals. This growing engagement with publishing is a natural extensions of the academic library's commitment to support the creation of and access to scholarship.

Making Things and Drawing Boundaries

Experiments in the Digital Humanities
Author: Jentery Sayers
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 1452955964
Category: Art
Page: 448
View: 3977

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In Making Things and Drawing Boundaries, critical theory and cultural practice meet creativity, collaboration, and experimentation with physical materials as never before. Foregrounding the interdisciplinary character of experimental methods and hands-on research, this collection asks what it means to “make” things in the humanities. How is humanities research manifested in hand and on screen alongside the essay and monograph? And, importantly, how does experimentation with physical materials correspond with social justice and responsibility? Comprising almost forty chapters from ninety practitioners across twenty disciplines, Making Things and Drawing Boundaries speaks directly and extensively to how humanities research engages a growing interest in “maker” culture, however “making” may be defined. Contributors: Erin R. Anderson; Joanne Bernardi; Yana Boeva; Jeremy Boggs; Duncan A. Buell; Amy Burek; Trisha N. Campbell; Debbie Chachra; Beth Compton; Heidi Rae Cooley; Nora Dimmock; Devon Elliott; Bill Endres; Katherine Faull; Alexander Flamenco; Emily Alden Foster; Sarah Fox; Chelsea A. M. Gardner; Susan Garfinkel; Lee Hannigan; Sara Hendren; Ryan Hunt; John Hunter; Diane Jakacki; Janelle Jenstad; Edward Jones-Imhotep; Julie Thompson Klein; Aaron D. Knochel; J. K. Purdom Lindblad; Kim Martin; Gwynaeth McIntyre; Aurelio Meza; Shezan Muhammedi; Angel David Nieves; Marcel O’Gorman; Amy Papaelias; Matt Ratto; Isaac Record; Jennifer Reed; Gabby Resch; Jennifer Roberts-Smith; Melissa Rogers; Daniela K. Rosner; Stan Ruecker; Roxanne Shirazi; James Smithies; P. P. Sneha; Lisa M. Snyder; Kaitlyn Solberg; Dan Southwick; David Staley; Elaine Sullivan; Joseph Takeda; Ezra Teboul; William J. Turkel; Lisa Tweten.

Cultural Heritage Infrastructures in Digital Humanities


Author: Agiatis Benardou,Erik Champion,Costis Dallas,Lorna Hughes
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131715651X
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 172
View: 4766

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What are the leading tools and archives in digital cultural heritage? How can they be integrated into research infrastructures to better serve their intended audiences? In this book, authors from a wide range of countries, representing some of the best research projects in digital humanities related to cultural heritage, discuss their latest findings, both in terms of new tools and archives, and how they are used (or not used) by both specialists and by the general public.

Heritage and Archaeology in the Digital Age

Acquisition, Curation, and Dissemination of Spatial Cultural Heritage Data
Author: Matthew L. Vincent,Víctor Manuel López-Menchero Bendicho,Marinos Ioannides,Thomas E. Levy
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319653709
Category: Social Science
Page: 198
View: 1094

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This book examines how computer-based programs can be used to acquire ‘big’ digital cultural heritage data, curate, and disseminate it over the Internet and in 3D visualization platforms with the ultimate goal of creating long-lasting “digital heritage repositories.’ The organization of the book reflects the essence of new technologies applied to cultural heritage and archaeology. Each of these stages bring their own challenges and considerations that need to be dealt with. The authors in each section present case studies and overviews of how each of these aspects might be dealt with. While technology is rapidly changing, the principles laid out in these chapters should serve as a guide for many years to come. The influence of the digital world on archaeology and cultural heritage will continue to shape these disciplines as advances in these technologies facilitate new lines of research. serif">The book is divided into three sections covering acquisition, curation, and dissemination (the major life cycles of cultural heritage data). Acquisition is one of the fundamental challenges for practitioners in heritage and archaeology, and the chapters in this section provide a template that highlights the principles for present and future work that will provide sustainable models for digital documentation. Following acquisition, the next section highlights how equally important curation is as the future of digital documentation depends on it. Preservation of digital data requires preservation that can guarantee a future for generations to come. The final section focuses on dissemination as it is what pushes the data beyond the shelves of storage and allows the public to experience the past through these new technologies, but also opens new lines of investigation by giving access to these data to researchers around the globe. Digital technology promises significant changes in how we approach social sciences, cultural heritage, and archaeology. However, researchers must consider not only the acquisition and curation, but also the dissemination of these data to their colleagues and the public. Throughout the book, many of the authors have highlighted the usefulness of Structure from Motion (SfM) work for cultural heritage documentation; others the utility and excitement of crowdsourcing as a ‘citizen scientist’ tool to engage not only trained students and researchers, but also the public in the cyber-archaeology endeavor. Both innovative tools facilitate the curation of digital cultural heritage and its dissemination. Together with all the chapters in this volume, the authors will help archaeologists, researchers interested in the digital humanities and scholars who focus on digital cultural heritage to assess where the field is and where it is going.

Positioning and Power in Academic Publishing: Players, Agents and Agendas

Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Electronic Publishing
Author: F. Loizides,B. Schmidt
Publisher: IOS Press
ISBN: 1614996490
Category: Computers
Page: 164
View: 8326

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The field of electronic publishing has grown exponentially in the last two decades, but we are still in the middle of this digital transformation. With technologies coming and going for all kinds of reasons, the distribution of economic, technological and discursive power continues to be negotiated.This book presents the proceedings of the 20th Conference on Electronic Publishing (Elpub), held in G�ttingen, Germany, in June 2016. This year's conference explores issues of positioning and power in academic publishing, and it brings together world leading stakeholders such as academics, practitioners, policymakers, students and entrepreneurs from a wide variety of fields to exchange information and discuss the advent of innovations in the areas of electronic publishing, as well as reflect on the development in the field over the last 20 years. Topics covered in the papers include how to maintain the quality of electronic publications, modeling processes and the increasingly prevalent issue of open access, as well as new systems, database repositories and datasets.This overview of the field will be of interest to all those who work in or make use of electronic publishing.

Curating Research Data


Author: Lisa R. Johnston
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780838988589
Category: Data curation in libraries
Page: 285
View: 942

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Data are becoming the proverbial coin of the digital realm: a research commodity that might purchase reputation credit in a disciplinary culture of data sharing, or buy transparency when faced with funding agency mandates or publisher scrutiny. Unlike most monetary systems, however, digital data can flow in all too great an abundance. Not only does this currency actually grow on trees, but it comes from animals, books, thoughts, and each of us! And that is what makes data curation so essential. The abundance of digital research data challenges library and information science professionals to harness this flow of information streaming from research discovery and scholarly pursuit and preserve the unique evidence for future use. Volume One of Curating Research Data explores the variety of reasons, motivations, and drivers for why data curation services are needed in the context of academic and disciplinary data repository efforts. Twelve chapters, divided into three parts, take an in-depth look at the complex practice of data curation as it emerges around us. Part I sets the stage for data curation by describing current policies, data sharing cultures, and collaborative efforts currently underway that impact potential services. Part II brings several key issues, such as cost recovery and marketing strategy, into focus for practitioners when considering how to put data curation services in action. Finally, Part III describes the full lifecycle of data by examining the ethical and practical reuse issues that data curation practitioners must consider as we strive to prepare data for the future. Digital data is ubiquitous and rapidly reshaping how scholarship progresses now and into the future. The information expertise of librarians can help ensure the resiliency of digital data, and the information it represents, by addressing how the meaning, integrity, and provenance of digital data generated by researchers today will be captured and conveyed to future researchers.

Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016


Author: Matthew K. Gold,Lauren F. Klein
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 1452951497
Category: Education
Page: 632
View: 9473

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Pairing full-length scholarly essays with shorter pieces drawn from scholarly blogs and conference presentations, as well as commissioned interviews and position statements, Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016 reveals a dynamic view of a field in negotiation with its identity, methods, and reach. Pieces in the book explore how DH can and must change in response to social justice movements and events like #Ferguson; how DH alters and is altered by community college classrooms; and how scholars applying DH approaches to feminist studies, queer studies, and black studies might reframe the commitments of DH analysts. Numerous contributors examine the movement of interdisciplinary DH work into areas such as history, art history, and archaeology, and a special forum on large-scale text mining brings together position statements on a fast-growing area of DH research. In the multivalent aspects of its arguments, progressing across a range of platforms and environments, Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016 offers a vision of DH as an expanded field—new possibilities, differently structured. Published simultaneously in print, e-book, and interactive webtext formats, each DH annual will be a book-length publication highlighting the particular debates that have shaped the discipline in a given year. By identifying key issues as they unfold, and by providing a hybrid model of open-access publication, these volumes and the Debates in the Digital Humanities series will articulate the present contours of the field and help forge its future. Contributors: Moya Bailey, Northeastern U; Fiona Barnett; Matthew Battles, Harvard U; Jeffrey M. Binder; Zach Blas, U of London; Cameron Blevins, Rutgers U; Sheila A. Brennan, George Mason U; Timothy Burke, Swarthmore College; Rachel Sagner Buurma, Swarthmore College; Micha Cárdenas, U of Washington–Bothell; Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, Brown U; Tanya E. Clement, U of Texas–Austin; Anne Cong-Huyen, Whittier College; Ryan Cordell, Northeastern U; Tressie McMillan Cottom, Virginia Commonwealth U; Amy E. Earhart, Texas A&M U; Domenico Fiormonte, U of Roma Tre; Paul Fyfe, North Carolina State U; Jacob Gaboury, Stony Brook U; Kim Gallon, Purdue U; Alex Gil, Columbia U; Brian Greenspan, Carleton U; Richard Grusin, U of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Michael Hancher, U of Minnesota; Molly O’Hagan Hardy; David L. Hoover, New York U; Wendy F. Hsu; Patrick Jagoda, U of Chicago; Jessica Marie Johnson, Michigan State U; Steven E. Jones, Loyola U; Margaret Linley, Simon Fraser U; Alan Liu, U of California, Santa Barbara; Elizabeth Losh, U of California, San Diego; Alexis Lothian, U of Maryland; Michael Maizels, Wellesley College; Mark C. Marino, U of Southern California; Anne B. McGrail, Lane Community College; Bethany Nowviskie, U of Virginia; Julianne Nyhan, U College London; Amanda Phillips, U of California, Davis; Miriam Posner, U of California, Los Angeles; Rita Raley, U of California, Santa Barbara; Stephen Ramsay, U of Nebraska–Lincoln; Margaret Rhee, U of Oregon; Lisa Marie Rhody, Graduate Center, CUNY; Roopika Risam, Salem State U; Stephen Robertson, George Mason U; Mark Sample, Davidson College; Jentery Sayers, U of Victoria; Benjamin M. Schmidt, Northeastern U; Scott Selisker, U of Arizona; Jonathan Senchyne, U of Wisconsin, Madison; Andrew Stauffer, U of Virginia; Joanna Swafford, SUNY New Paltz; Toniesha L. Taylor, Prairie View A&M U; Dennis Tenen; Melissa Terras, U College London; Anna Tione; Ted Underwood, U of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign; Ethan Watrall, Michigan State U; Jacqueline Wernimont, Arizona State U; Laura Wexler, Yale U; Hong-An Wu, U of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign.

Software Studies

A Lexicon
Author: Roger F. Malina,Sean Cubitt
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262062747
Category: Computers
Page: 334
View: 742

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This collection of short expository, critical and speculative texts offers a field guide to the cultural, political, social and aesthetic impact of software. Experts from a range of disciplines each take a key topic in software and the understanding of software, such as algorithms and logical structures.

Research Methods for History


Author: Lucy Faire
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 1474408745
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 9303

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Historians have become increasingly sensitive to social and cultural theory since the 1980s, yet the actual methods by which research is carried out in History have been largely taken for granted. Research Methods for History encourages those researching the past to think creatively about the wide range of methods currently in use, to understand how these methods are used and what historical insights they can provide. This updated new edition has been expanded to cover not only sources and methods that are well-established in History, such as archival research, but also those that have developed recently, such as the impact of digital history research. The themes of the different chapters have been selected to reflect new trends in the subject, including landscape studies, material culture and ethics. Every chapter presents new insights and perspectives and will open researchers minds to the expanding possibilities of historical research.

Digital Methods


Author: Richard Rogers
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262313391
Category: Computers
Page: 280
View: 8354

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In Digital Methods, Richard Rogers proposes a methodological outlook for social and cultural scholarly research on the Web that seeks to move Internet research beyond the study of online culture. It is not a toolkit for Internet research, or operating instructions for a software package; it deals with broader questions. How can we study social media to learn something about society rather than about social media use? Rogers proposes repurposing Web-native techniques for research into cultural change and societal conditions. We can learn to reapply such "methods of the medium" as crawling and crowd sourcing, PageRank and similar algorithms, tag clouds and other visualizations; we can learn how they handle hits, likes, tags, date stamps, and other Web-native objects. By "thinking along" with devices and the objects they handle, digital research methods can follow the evolving methods of the medium. Rogers uses this new methodological outlook to examine such topics as the findings of inquiries into 9/11 search results, the recognition of climate change skeptics by climate-change-related Web sites, and the censorship of the Iranian Web. With Digital Methods, Rogers introduces a new vision and method for Internet research and at the same time applies them to the Web's objects of study, from tiny particles (hyperlinks) to large masses (social media).

Practice-led Research, Research-led Practice in the Creative Arts


Author: Hazel Smith
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748636307
Category: Art
Page: 288
View: 9571

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This book addresses one of the most exciting and innovative developments within higher education: the rise in prominence of the creative arts and the accelerating recognition that creative practice is a form of research. The book considers how creative practice can lead to research insights through what is often known as practice-led research. But unlike other books on practice-led research, it balances this with discussion of how research can impact positively on creative practice through research-led practice. The editors posit an iterative and web-like relationship between practice and research. Essays within the book cover a wide range of disciplines including creative writing, dance, music, theatre, film and new media, and the contributors are from the UK, US, Canada and Australia. The subject is approached from numerous angles: the authors discuss methodologies of practice-led research and research-led practice, their own creative work as a form of research, research training for creative practitioners, and the politics and histories of practice-led research and research-led practice within the university. The book will be invaluable for creative practitioners, researchers, students in the creative arts and university leaders. Key Features*The first book to document, conceptualise and analyse practice-led research in the creative arts and to balance it with research-led practice*Written by highly qualified academics and practitioners across the creative arts and sciences *Brings together empirical, cultural and creative approaches*Presents illuminating case histories of creative work and practice-led research

Digital Curation in the Digital Humanities

Preserving and Promoting Archival and Special Collections
Author: Arjun Sabharwal
Publisher: Chandos Publishing
ISBN: 0081001789
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 182
View: 8412

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Archives and special collections departments have a long history of preserving and providing long-term access to organizational records, rare books, and other unique primary sources including manuscripts, photographs, recordings, and artifacts in various formats. The careful curatorial attention to such records has also ensured that such records remain available to researchers and the public as sources of knowledge, memory, and identity. Digital curation presents an important framework for the continued preservation of digitized and born-digital collections, given the ephemeral and device-dependent nature of digital content. With the emergence of analog and digital media formats in close succession (compared to earlier paper- and film-based formats) came new standards, technologies, methods, documentation, and workflows to ensure safe storage and access to content and associated metadata. Researchers in the digital humanities have extensively applied computing to research; for them, continued access to primary data and cultural heritage means both the continuation of humanities scholarship and new methodologies not possible without digital technology. Digital Curation in the Digital Humanities, therefore, comprises a joint framework for preserving, promoting, and accessing digital collections. This book explores at great length the conceptualization of digital curation projects with interdisciplinary approaches that combine the digital humanities and history, information architecture, social networking, and other themes for such a framework. The individual chapters focus on the specifics of each area, but the relationships holding the knowledge architecture and the digital curation lifecycle model together remain an overarching theme throughout the book; thus, each chapter connects to others on a conceptual, theoretical, or practical level. theoretical and practical perspectives on digital curation in the digital humanities and history in-depth study of the role of social media and a social curation ecosystem the role of hypertextuality and information architecture in digital curation study of collaboration and organizational dimensions in digital curation reviews of important web tools in digital humanities

A Companion to Digital Humanities


Author: Susan Schreibman,Ray Siemens,John Unsworth
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470999861
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 640
View: 3205

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This Companion offers a thorough, concise overview of the emerging field of humanities computing. Contains 37 original articles written by leaders in the field. Addresses the central concerns shared by those interested in the subject. Major sections focus on the experience of particular disciplines in applying computational methods to research problems; the basic principles of humanities computing; specific applications and methods; and production, dissemination and archiving. Accompanied by a website featuring supplementary materials, standard readings in the field and essays to be included in future editions of the Companion.

The Routledge Companion to Digital Humanities in Theatre and Performance


Author: Nic Leonhardt
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781138917774
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 2096

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Digital Humanities has emerged in recent years as a new paradigm within theatre and performance studies. This is the first volume to compile scholarly and best practice knowledge from around the globe, and to address both the history and future of this new field. Contributors examine a range of projects documenting, reconstructing and visualizing theatre and performance practices both past and present; discuss a new methodology for theatre scholarship, and for archiving and preserving works; and consider the impact of the Digital Humanities on higher education in theatre and performance studies.

Digital Humanities in Practice


Author: Claire Warwick,Melissa Terras,Julianne Nyhan
Publisher: Facet Publishing
ISBN: 1856047660
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 192
View: 6353

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This cutting-edge and comprehensive introduction to digital humanities explains the scope of the discipline and state of the art and provides a wide-ranging insight into emerging topics and avenues of research. Each chapter interweaves the expert commentary of leading academics with analysis of current research and practice, exploring the possibilities and challenges that occur when culture and digital technologies intersect. International case studies of projects ranging from crowdsourced manuscript transcription to computational reconstruction of frescoes are included in each chapter, providing a wealth of information and inspiration. QR codes within each chapter link to a dedicated website where additional content, such as further case studies, is located. Key topics covered include: • studying users and readers • social media and crowdsourcing • digitization and digital resources • image processing in the digital humanities • 3D recording and museums • electronic text and text encoding • book history, texts and digital editing • open access and online teaching of digital humanities • institutional models for digital humanities. Readership: This is an essential practical guide for academics, researchers, librarians and professionals involved in the digital humanities. It will also be core reading for all humanities students and those taking courses in the digital humanities in particular.

Research Methods for Cultural Studies


Author: Michael Pickering
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748631194
Category: Reference
Page: 256
View: 6221

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This new textbook addresses the neglect of practical research methods in cultural studies. It provides readers with clearly written overviews of research methods in cultural studies, along with guidelines on how to put these methods into operation. It advocates a multi-method approach, with students drawing from a pool of techniques and approaches suitable for their own topics of investigation.The book covers the following main areas:* Drawing on experience, and studying how narratives make sense of experience.* Investigating production processes in the cultural industries, and the consumption and assimilation of cultural products by audiences and fans.* Taking both quantitative and qualitative approaches to the study of cultural life.* Analysing visual images and both spoken and written forms of discourse.* Exploring cultural memory and historical representation.

Defining Digital Humanities

A Reader
Author: Dr Edward Vanhoutte
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409469638
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 330
View: 7050

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This reader brings together the essential readings that have emerged in Digital Humanities. It provides a historical overview of how the term ‘Humanities Computing’ developed into the term ‘Digital Humanities’, and highlights core readings which explore the meaning, scope, and implementation of the field. To contextualize and frame each included reading, the editors and authors provide a commentary on the original piece. There is also an annotated bibliography of other material not included in the text to provide an essential list of reading in the discipline.