Rena's Promise

A Story of Sisters in Auschwitz
Author: Rena Kornreich Gelissen,Heather Dune Macadam
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807095095
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 320
View: 3144

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An expanded edition of the powerful memoir about two sisters' determination to survive during the Holocaust featuring new and never before revealed information about the first transport of women to Auschwitz Sent to Auschwitz on the first Jewish transport, Rena Kornreich survived the Nazi death camps for over three years. While there she was reunited with her sister Danka. Each day became a struggle to fulfill the promise Rena made to her mother when the family was forced to split apart--a promise to take care of her sister. One of the few Holocaust memoirs about the lives of women in the camps, Rena's Promise is a compelling story of the fleeting human connections that fostered determination and made survival a possibility. From the bonds between mothers, daughters, and sisters, to the links between prisoners, and even prisoners and guards, Rena's Promise reminds us of the humanity and hope that survives inordinate inhumanity.

Rena's Promise

A Story of Sisters in Auschwitz
Author: Rena Kornreich Gelissen,Heather Dune Macadam
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807035378
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: N.A
View: 1721

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Sent to Auschwitz on the first Jewish transport, Rena Kornreich survived the Nazi death camps for over three years. While there she was reunited with her sister Danka. Each day became a struggle to fulfill the promise Rena made to her mother when the family was forced to split apart--a promise to take care of her sister. One of the few Holocaust memoirs about the lives of women in the camps, Rena's Promise is a compelling story of the fleeting human connections that fostered determination and made survival a possibility. From the bonds between mothers, daughters, and sisters, to the links between prisoners, and even prisoners and guards, Rena's Promise reminds us of the humanity and hope that survives inordinate inhumanity.

Things We Couldn't Say


Author: Diet Eman,James Schaap
Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
ISBN: 9780802847478
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 392
View: 5034

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Things We Couldn't Say is the true story of Diet Eman, a young Dutch woman, who, with her fiance, Hein Sietsma, risked everything to rescue imperiled Jews in Nazi-occupied Holland during World War II. Throughout the years that Diet and Hein aided the Resistance--work that would cost Diet her freedom and Hein his life--their courageous effort ultimately saved hundreds of Dutch Jews. Now available in paperback, Things We Couldn't Say tells an unforgettable story of heroism, faith, and--above all--love.

The Weeping Buddha


Author: Heather Dune Macadam
Publisher: Akashic Books
ISBN: 1617750972
Category: Fiction
Page: 350
View: 2425

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New Year’s Eve: Long Island detectives Devon Halsey and Lochwood Brennen, secret lovers, are thrust into mayhem by the grisly murder of Devon’s best friend. What has haunted Devon for years begins to take shape, and as she dissects the file, she learns that the carvings in the victims’ bodies are actually Koans—unanswerable questions that must be meditated upon in order to reach enlightenment. Heather Dune Macadam is a professor at Suffolk County Community College and a former dancer with the Martha Graham Dance Company. She is the author of Rena’s Promise, a nonfiction memoir about Auschwitz, which was nominated for a National Book Award. Her writing has appeared in Newsweek and the New York Times Sunday Magazine.

I Am a Star

Child of the Holocaust
Author: Inge Auerbacher
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101128008
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 96
View: 5218

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The Nazis tried to destroy Inge's life--but they could not break her spirit. Inge Auerbacher's childhood was as happy and peaceful as any other German child's--until 1942. By then, the Nazis were in power, and because Inge's family was Jewish, she and her parents were sent to a concentration camp in Czechoslovakia. The Auerbachers defied death for three years, and were finally freed in 1945. In her own words, Inge Auerbacher tells her family's harrowing story--and how they carried with them ever after the strength and courage of will that allowed them to survive.

Auschwitz (Oświęcim)

1940-1945
Author: Kazimierz Smoleń
Publisher:
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: 103
View: 4486

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Auschwitz was one of the first books to bring the full horror of the Nazi death camps to the American public; this is, as the New York Review of Books said, "the best brief account of the Auschwitz experience available." When the Nazis invaded Hungary in 1944, they sent virtually the entire Jewish population to Auschwitz. A Jew and a medical doctor, the prisoner Dr. Miklos Nyiszli was spared death for a grimmer fate: to perform "scientific research" on his fellow inmates under the supervision of the man who became known as the infamous "Angel of Death"—Dr. Josef Mengele. Nyiszli was named Mengele's personal research pathologist. In that capactity he also served as physician to the Sonderkommando, the Jewish prisoners who worked exclusively in the crematoriums and were routinely executed after four months. Miraculously, Nyiszli survived to give this horrifying and sobering account. Auschwitz was one of the first books to bring the full horror of the Nazi death camps to...

All But My Life

A Memoir
Author: Gerda Weissmann Klein
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 1466812427
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 256
View: 3504

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All But My Life is the unforgettable story of Gerda Weissmann Klein's six-year ordeal as a victim of Nazi cruelty. From her comfortable home in Bielitz (present-day Bielsko) in Poland to her miraculous survival and her liberation by American troops--including the man who was to become her husband--in Volary, Czechoslovakia, in 1945, Gerda takes the reader on a terrifying journey. Gerda's serene and idyllic childhood is shattered when Nazis march into Poland on September 3, 1939. Although the Weissmanns were permitted to live for a while in the basement of their home, they were eventually separated and sent to German labor camps. Over the next few years Gerda experienced the slow, inexorable stripping away of "all but her life." By the end of the war she had lost her parents, brother, home, possessions, and community; even the dear friends she made in the labor camps, with whom she had shared so many hardships, were dead. Despite her horrifying experiences, Klein conveys great strength of spirit and faith in humanity. In the darkness of the camps, Gerda and her young friends manage to create a community of friendship and love. Although stripped of the essence of life, they were able to survive the barbarity of their captors. Gerda's beautifully written story gives an invaluable message to everyone. It introduces them to last century's terrible history of devastation and prejudice, yet offers them hope that the effects of hatred can be overcome.

Boy 30529: A Memoir


Author: Felix Weinberg
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1781680787
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 168
View: 9736

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Chronicles the author's Holocaust experience which began at age twelve, detailing his survival at five concentration camps, the loss of his mother and brother in the camps, and his reunion with his father in Britain after the war.

Of a Comb, a Prayer Book, Sugar Cubes, & Lice

Survivor of Six Concentration Camps : Elizabeth Blum Goldstein : A-20737
Author: Elizabeth Blum Goldstein,Shana Fogarty
Publisher: Comteq
ISBN: 9780976688945
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 75
View: 6312

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Survival In Auschwitz


Author: Primo Levi
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0684826801
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 187
View: 597

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The author describes his twenty month ordeal in the Nazi death camp.

After Auschwitz

A Story of Heartbreak and Survival by the Stepsister of Anne Frank
Author: Eva Schloss
Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton
ISBN: 144476070X
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 336
View: 458

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Eva was arrested by the Nazis on her fifteenth birthday and sent to Auschwitz. Her survival depended on endless strokes of luck, her own determination and the love and protection of her mother Fritzi, who was deported with her. When Auschwitz was liberated, Eva and Fritzi began the long journey home. They searched desperately for Eva's father and brother, from whom they had been separated. The news came some months later. Tragically, both men had been killed. Before the war, in Amsterdam, Eva had become friendly with a young girl called Anne Frank. Though their fates were very different, Eva's life was set to be entwined with her friend's for ever more, after her mother Fritzi married Anne's father Otto Frank in 1953. This is a searingly honest account of how an ordinary person survived the Holocaust. Eva's memories and descriptions are heartbreakingly clear, her account brings the horror as close as it can possibly be. But this is also an exploration of what happened next, of Eva's struggle to live with herself after the war and to continue the work of her step-father Otto, ensuring that the legacy of Anne Frank is never forgotten.

The Journal of Hélène Berr


Author: Hélène Berr
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 1602860947
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 307
View: 9442

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Following in the tradition of timeless Holocaust literature such as "Anne Frank: Diary of a Young Girl" and "Suite Francaise," this important literary contribution by a young writer presents an account of war-time Paris that is profoundly affecting and devastatingly lucid.

Helga's Diary: A Young Girl's Account of Life in a Concentration Camp

A Young Girl’s Account of Life in a Concentration Camp
Author: Helga Weiss
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393089746
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 240
View: 1664

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“A sacred reminder of what so many millions suffered, and only a few survived.”—Adam Kirsch, New Republic In 1939, Helga Weiss was a young Jewish schoolgirl in Prague. Along with some 45,000 Jews living in the city, Helga’s family endured the first wave of the Nazi invasion: her father was denied work; she was forbidden from attending regular school. As Helga witnessed the increasing Nazi brutality, she began documenting her experiences in a diary. In 1941, Helga and her parents were sent to the concentration camp of Terezín. There, Helga continued to write with astonishing insight about her daily life: the squalid living quarters, the cruel rationing of food, and the executions—as well as the moments of joy and hope that persisted in even the worst conditions. In 1944, Helga and her family were sent to Auschwitz. Before she left, Helga’s uncle, who worked in the Terezín records department, hid her diary and drawings in a brick wall. Miraculously, he was able to reclaim them for her after the war. Of the 15,000 children brought to Terezín and later deported to Auschwitz, only 100 survived. Helga was one of them. Reconstructed from her original notebooks, the diary is presented here in its entirety. With an introduction by Francine Prose, a revealing interview between translator Neil Bermel and Helga, and the artwork Helga made during her time at Terezín, Helga's Diary stands as a vivid and utterly unique historical document.

Inside America's Concentration Camps

Two Centuries of Internment and Torture
Author: James L. Dickerson
Publisher: Chicago Review Press
ISBN: 1569767483
Category: History
Page: 312
View: 3814

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Exploring the history and tragedy of concentration camps that were built, staged, and filled with adults and children under the orders of the U.S. government, this vivid narrative brings the stories of victims and flaws of American government to life. Beginning in the 1830s with the imprisonment of Native Americans, this investigation details the camps that reappeared during World War II with the round-up of Japanese Americans, German Americans, Italian Americans, and Jews fleeing Nazi Germany, as well as more recently during the Bush administration with the construction of new concentration camps in Cuba. The moving personal experiences of those imprisoned in the camps, including accounts of how the U.S. government removed children of Japanese ancestry from orphanages only to replace them in camps, are revealed within this eye-opening history. Both heartbreaking and inspirational, this authoritative record of survival suggests a call to action for those who read it.

The Holocaust

A German Historian Examines the Genocide
Author: Wolfgang Benz
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231112147
Category: History
Page: 186
View: 2914

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Examines the holocaust from a German perspective, providing and analyzing the facts and political decisions which led to the murder of millions of Jews and other ethnic groups during the Nazi regime

The Secret Holocaust Diaries

The Untold Story of Nonna Bannister
Author: N.A
Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.
ISBN: 9781414341774
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 336
View: 5603

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The author documents her experiences during World War II through a secret diary she kept during her time in a concentration camp and the years following the war.

I Am a Star

Child of the Holocaust
Author: Inge Auerbacher
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0140364013
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 87
View: 6931

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The author's reminiscences about her childhood in Germany, years of which were spent in a Nazi concentration camp. Includes several of her original poems.

Alicia

My Story
Author: Alicia Appleman
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 0307788644
Category: History
Page: 448
View: 3684

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After losing her entire family to the Nazis at age 13, Alicia Appleman-Jurman went on to save the lives of thousands of Jews, offering them her own courage and hope in a time of upheaval and tragedy. Not since The Diary of Anne Frank has a young voice so vividly expressed the capacity for humanity and heroism in the face of Nazi brutality.

Great Soul of Siberia

Passion, Obsession, and One Man's Quest for the World's Most Elusive Tiger
Author: Sooyong Park
Publisher: Greystone Books
ISBN: 1771641142
Category: Nature
Page: 340
View: 5042

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In The Great Soul of Siberia, renowned tiger researcher Sooyong Park tracks three generations of Siberian tigers living in remote southeastern Russia. Reminiscent of the way Timothy Treadwell (the so-called Grizzly Man) immersed himself in the lives of bears, Park sets up underground bunkers to observe the tigers, living thrillingly close to these beautiful but dangerous apex predators. At the same time, he draws from twenty years of experience and research to focus on the Siberian tigers’ losing battle against poaching and diminishing habitat. Over the two years of his harrowing stakeout, Park’s poignant and poetic observations of the tigers draw a fiercely compassionate portrait of these elusive, endangered creatures.

One Thousand White Women

The Journals of May Dodd
Author: Jim Fergus
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 9781429938846
Category: Fiction
Page: 304
View: 1843

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One Thousand White Women is the story of May Dodd and a colorful assembly of pioneer women who, under the auspices of the U.S. government, travel to the western prairies in 1875 to intermarry among the Cheyenne Indians. The covert and controversial "Brides for Indians" program, launched by the administration of Ulysses S. Grant, is intended to help assimilate the Indians into the white man's world. Toward that end May and her friends embark upon the adventure of their lifetime. Jim Fergus has so vividly depicted the American West that it is as if these diaries are a capsule in time.