Religion and Sports

An Introduction and Case Studies
Author: Rebecca T. Alpert
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231539320
Category: Religion
Page: 208
View: 7289

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Like religion, playing and watching sports is a deeply meaningful, celebratory ritual enjoyed by millions across the world. The first scholarly work designed for use in both religion and sports courses, this collection develops and then applies a theoretically grounded approach to studying sports engagement globally and its relationship to modern-day issues of violence, difference, social protest, and belonging. Case studies explore the place of sports in mainstream faiths, such as Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Christianity, and lesser-known religious groups, particularly in Africa. It covers football, baseball, and basketball but also archery, soccer, bullfighting, judo, and track. Essays reflect all skill levels, from amateur to professional, and find surprising affinities among practices and cultures in locations as disparate as Germany and Japan, Spain and Saudi Arabia. Thoroughly examining a range of phenomena, this collection fully captures the unique overlap of two universal institutions and their interplay with human society, politics, and culture.

Religion and Sports in American Culture


Author: Jeffrey Scholes,Raphael Sassower
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135121346
Category: Religion
Page: 168
View: 5083

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Religion and Sports in American Culture explores the relationship between religion and modern sports in America. Whether found in the religious purpose of ancient Olympic Games, in curses believed to plague the Chicago Cubs, or in the figure of Tim Tebow, religion and sports have been and are still tightly intertwined. While there is widespread suspicion that sports are slowly encroaching on the territory historically occupied by religion, Scholes and Sassower assert that sports are not replacing religion and that neither is sports a religion. Instead, the authors look at the relationship between sports and religion in America from a post-secular perspective that looks at both discourses as a part of the same cultural web. In this way each institution is able to maintain its own integrity, legitimacy, and unique expression of cultural values as they relate to each other. Utilizing important themes that intersect both religion and sports, Scholes and Sassower illuminate the complex and often publicly contentious relationship between the two. Appropriate for both classroom use and for the interested non-specialist, Religion and Sports in American Culture brings pilgrimage, sacrifice, relics, and redemption together in an unexpected cultural continuity.

Religion and Popular Culture in America, Third Edition


Author: Bruce David Forbes,Jeffrey H. Mahan
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520291468
Category: Religion
Page: 464
View: 3170

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"Since 2000, Religion and Popular Culture in America has been one [of the] standard books used in teaching this area of study. Modestly updated in 2005, it continues to be taught in colleges, universities and theological schools across the continent. The basic four-part structure of Religion and Popular Culture in America remains sound and is a feature that appeals to many who have taught the volume. Section One, Religion in Popular Culture, examines the way traditional religious symbols, narratives, and forms of religious practice appear in popular culture. Section Two, Popular Culture in Religion, considers how religion takes on and is reshaped by styles and values of popular culture. Section Three, Popular Culture as Religion, explores the ways that aspects of popular culture and their reception might be considered to be forms of religion. Section Four, Religion and Popular Culture in Dialogue, introduces religiously based critiques of popular culture and ways that popular culture articulates common critiques of religion. The third edition maintains the structure and basic length of the current edition and retains Forbes' introductory framework and update versions of key essay. But they replace many of the more dated subjects with new material drawing on more contemporary examples. A concluding essay by Mahan organizes key insights from the essays and relates them to the theories of popular culture illuminated in the introduction"--Provided by publisher.

Religion and Sports

An Introduction and Case Studies
Author: Rebecca T. Alpert
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231539320
Category: Religion
Page: 208
View: 1103

Continue Reading →

Like religion, playing and watching sports is a deeply meaningful, celebratory ritual enjoyed by millions across the world. The first scholarly work designed for use in both religion and sports courses, this collection develops and then applies a theoretically grounded approach to studying sports engagement globally and its relationship to modern-day issues of violence, difference, social protest, and belonging. Case studies explore the place of sports in mainstream faiths, such as Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Christianity, and lesser-known religious groups, particularly in Africa. It covers football, baseball, and basketball but also archery, soccer, bullfighting, judo, and track. Essays reflect all skill levels, from amateur to professional, and find surprising affinities among practices and cultures in locations as disparate as Germany and Japan, Spain and Saudi Arabia. Thoroughly examining a range of phenomena, this collection fully captures the unique overlap of two universal institutions and their interplay with human society, politics, and culture.

Religion and the Creation of Race and Ethnicity

An Introduction
Author: Craig R. Prentiss
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814767009
Category: Religion
Page: 243
View: 1717

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This volume, meant specifically for those new to the field, brings together an ensemble of prominent scholars and illuminates the role religious myths have played in shaping those social boundaries that we call "races" and "ethnicities".

How Sweet the Sound

Music in the Spiritual Lives of Americans
Author: David Ware Stowe
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674012905
Category: Music
Page: 335
View: 9917

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The evolution of the sacred music in America's houses of worship from colonial times to today--and from early hymns to hip-hop--is traced in a study that suggests that sacred music may show how different forms of faith have proliferated and sustained themselves.

Understanding Sport as a Religious Phenomenon

An Introduction
Author: Eric Bain-Selbo,D. Gregory Sapp
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1472506987
Category: Religion
Page: 184
View: 9338

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Readers are introduced to a range of theoretical and methodological approaches used to understand religion – including sociology, philosophy, psychology, and anthropology – and how they can be used to understand sport as a religious phenomenon. Topics include the formation of powerful communities among fans and the religious experience of the fan, myth, symbols and rituals and the sacrality of sport, and sport and secularization. Case studies are taken from around the world and include the Olympics (ancient and modern), football in the UK, the All Blacks and New Zealand national identity, college football in the American South, and gymnastics. Ideal for classroom use, Understanding Sport as a Religious Phenomenon illuminates the nature of religion through sports phenomena and is a much-needed contribution to the field of religion and popular culture.

Playing for God

Evangelical Women and the Unintended Consequences of Sports Ministry
Author: Annie Blazer
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479819905
Category: Religion
Page: 256
View: 3123

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When sports ministry first emerged in the 1950s and 1960s, its founders imagined male celebrity athletes as powerful salespeople who could deliver a message of Christian strength: “If athletes can endorse shaving cream, razor blades, and cigarettes, surely they can endorse the Lord, too,” reasoned Fellowship of Christian Athletes founder Don McClanen. But combining evangelicalism and sport did much more than serve as an advertisement for religion: it gave athletes the opportunity to think about the embodied experiences of sport as a way to experience intimate connection with the divine. As sports ministry developed, it focused on individual religious experiences and downplayed celebrity sales power, opening the door for female Christian athletes to join and eventually dominate sports ministry. Today, women are the majority of participants in sports ministry in the United States. In Playing for God, Annie Blazer offers an exploration of the history and religious lives of Christian athletes, showing that evangelical engagement with popular culture can carry unintended consequences. When sport became an avenue for embodied worship, it forced a reckoning with evangelical teachings about the body. Female Christian athletes increasingly turned to their own bodies to understand their religious identity, and in so doing, came to question evangelical mainstays on gender and sexuality. What was once a male-dominated masculinist project of sports engagement became a female-dominated movement that challenged evangelical ideas on femininity, marriage hierarchy, and the sinfulness of homosexuality. Though evangelicalism has not changed sporting culture, for those involved in sports ministry, sport has changed evangelicalism.

Like Bread on the Seder Plate

Jewish Lesbians and the Transformation of Tradition
Author: Rebecca T. Alpert
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231096614
Category: Religion
Page: 214
View: 2549

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In 1846 a small book entitled Poems by Currer, Ellis and Acton Bellappeared on the British Literary scene. The three psuedonymous poets, the Brontë sisters went on to unprecedented success with such novels as Wuthering Heights, Agnes Grey, and Jane Eyre, all published in the following year. As children, these English sisters had begun writing poems and stories abotu an imaginary country named Gondal, yet they never sought to publish any of their work until Charlotte's discovery of Emily's more mature poems in the autumn of 1845. Charlotte later recalled: "I accidentally lighted on a MS. volume of verse in my sister Emily's handwriting....I looked it over, amd something more than surprise seized me -- a deep conviction that these were not common effusions, nor at all like the poetry women generally write. I thought them condensed and terse, vigorous and genuine. To my ear they had also a peculiar music -- wild, melancholy, and elevating." The renowned Hatfield edition of The Complete Poems of Emily Jane Brontë includes the poetry that captivated Charlotte Brontë a century and a half ago, a body of work that continues to resonate today. This incomparable volume includes Emily's verse from Poems by Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell as well as 200 works collected from various manuscript sources after her death in 1848. Some were deited and preserved by Charlotte and Arthur Bell Nichols; still others were discovered years later by Brontë scholars. Originally released in 1923, Hatfield's collection was the result of a remarkable attempt over twenty years to isolate Emily's poems from her sisters' and to achieve chronological order. Accompanied by an interpretive preface on "The Gondal Story" by Miss Fannie E. Ratchford, author of The Brontë's Web of Childhood, the edition is the definitive collection of Emily Brontë's poetical works.

Jewish Radical Feminism

Voices from the Women’s Liberation Movement
Author: Joyce Antler
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814705391
Category: History
Page: 464
View: 5540

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Fifty years after the start of the women’s liberation movement, a book that at last illuminates the profound impact Jewishness and second-wave feminism had on each other

Race, Nation, and Religion in the Americas


Author: Henry Goldschmidt,Elizabeth McAlister
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 019514919X
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 338
View: 6599

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A collection of new essays exploring the complex and unstable articulations of race and religion. Drawing on original research, the authors investigate how race and religion have defined global relations, shaped the everyday lives of individuals and communities and how communities use religion to contest the power of racism.

Global Practices and Training in Applied Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology

A Case Study Approach
Author: J. Gualberto Cremades,Lauren S. Tashman
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1317230582
Category: Psychology
Page: 462
View: 4480

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Global Practices and Training in Applied Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology offers case analysis as a vehicle to address issues and experiences in the application of sport, exercise, and performance psychology (SEPP) and the supervision/training of individuals to become professionals in the field. A follow-up to Becoming a Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology Professional (2014), this book features a discussion of real-world case examples which highlight various aspects of professional practice as well as supervision and training. Professionals from around the world, including the United States and Canada, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia share diverse experiences, providing a uniquely in-depth, global perspective. The case studies contained in the book were selected to provide insight into specific elements of applied practice and supervision/training through a global lens as well as demonstrate the value of incorporating case analysis and reflection into one’s training and continued professional development. Case analysis is an essential part of learning and instruction. Beyond educating the reader about theories and research on related topics in the field, case analysis allows for more complex levels of learning, including analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of diverse scenarios. In Part I of this book, the cases focus on applied SEPP practice; Part II is comprised of cases that focus on training and supervision. This book is essential reading for graduate students and neophyte professionals in the field for whom it is critical to learn how to effectively apply knowledge to real-world sport, exercise, and performance psychology scenarios. In addition, the book is a useful resource for seasoned and expert practitioners and supervisors who can use case analysis as a means of continuing their professional development.

Science and Religion

Are They Compatible?
Author: Daniel C. Dennett,Alvin Plantinga
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: N.A
Category: Religion
Page: 96
View: 3294

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An enlightening discussion that will motivate students to think critically, the book opens with Plantinga's assertion that Christianity is compatible with evolutionary theory because Christians believe that God created the living world, and it is entirely possible that God did so by using a process of evolution.

Betraying Spinoza

The Renegade Jew Who Gave Us Modernity
Author: Rebecca Goldstein
Publisher: Schocken
ISBN: 9780307514172
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 304
View: 5245

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Part of the Jewish Encounter series In 1656, Amsterdam’s Jewish community excommunicated Baruch Spinoza, and, at the age of twenty–three, he became the most famous heretic in Judaism. He was already germinating a secularist challenge to religion that would be as radical as it was original. He went on to produce one of the most ambitious systems in the history of Western philosophy, so ahead of its time that scientists today, from string theorists to neurobiologists, count themselves among Spinoza’s progeny. In Betraying Spinoza, Rebecca Goldstein sets out to rediscover the flesh-and-blood man often hidden beneath the veneer of rigorous rationality, and to crack the mystery of the breach between the philosopher and his Jewish past. Goldstein argues that the trauma of the Inquisition’ s persecution of its forced Jewish converts plays itself out in Spinoza’s philosophy. The excommunicated Spinoza, no less than his excommunicators, was responding to Europe’ s first experiment with racial anti-Semitism. Here is a Spinoza both hauntingly emblematic and deeply human, both heretic and hero—a surprisingly contemporary figure ripe for our own uncertain age. From the Hardcover edition.

Einstein's God

Conversations about Science and the Human Spirit
Author: Krista Tippett
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143116770
Category: Religion
Page: 286
View: 7383

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Collects interviews and discussions on the interplay between scientific and religious inquiry, contributed by some of today's greatest thinkers, including Dr. Mehmet Oz, Freeman Dyson, Paul Davies, and Esther Sternberg.

Sports in American Life

A History
Author: Richard O. Davies
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118912543
Category: History
Page: 464
View: 9384

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The third edition of author Richard O. Davies? highly praised narrative of American sports, Sports in American Life: A History, features extensive revisions and updates to its presentation of an interpretative history of the relationship of sports to the larger themes of U.S. history. Updated include a new section on concussions caused by contact sports and new biographies of John Wooden and Joe Paterno.? Features extensive revisions and updates, along with a leaner, faster-paced narrative than previous editions Addresses the social, economic, and cultural interaction between sports and gender, race, class, and other larger issues Provides expanded coverage of college sports, women in sports, race and racism in organized sports, and soccer?s sharp rise in popularity Features an all-new section that tackles the growing controversy of head injuries and concussions caused by contact sports

Black Gods of the Asphalt

Religion, Hip-Hop, and Street Basketball
Author: Onaje X. O. Woodbine
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231541120
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 519

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J-Rod moves like a small tank on the court, his face mean, staring down his opponents. "I play just like my father," he says. "Before my father died, he was a problem on the court. I'm a problem." Playing basketball for him fuses past and present, conjuring his father's memory into a force that opponents can feel in each bone-snapping drive to the basket. On the street, every ballplayer has a story. Onaje X. O. Woodbine, a former streetball player who became an all-star Ivy Leaguer, brings the sights and sounds, hopes and dreams of street basketball to life. He shows that big games have a trickster figure and a master of black talk whose commentary interprets the game for audiences. The beats of hip-hop and reggae make up the soundtrack, and the ballplayers are half-men, half-heroes, defying the ghetto's limitations with their flights to the basket. Basketball is popular among young black American men but not because, as many claim, they are "pushed by poverty" or "pulled" by white institutions to play it. Black men choose to participate in basketball because of the transcendent experience of the game. Through interviews with and observations of urban basketball players, Onaje X. O. Woodbine composes a rare portrait of a passionate, committed, and resilient group of athletes who use the court to mine what urban life cannot corrupt. If people turn to religion to reimagine their place in the world, then black streetball players are indeed the hierophants of the asphalt.

36 Arguments for the Existence of God

A Work of Fiction
Author: Rebecca Goldstein
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307456714
Category: Fiction
Page: 506
View: 463

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Psychology professor Cass Seltzer finds his relationship challenged by a former girlfriend's invitation to join her biochemistry experiment in immortality, an effort that is complicated by his ongoing quest to understand religion.

Union Made

Working People and the Rise of Social Christianity in Chicago
Author: Heath W. Carter
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199385971
Category: Religion
Page: 240
View: 3472

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In Gilded Age America, rampant inequality gave rise to a new form of Christianity, one that sought to ease the sufferings of the poor not simply by saving their souls, but by transforming society. In Union Made, Heath W. Carter advances a bold new interpretation of the origins of American Social Christianity. While historians have often attributed the rise of the Social Gospel to middle-class ministers, seminary professors, and social reformers, this book places working people at the very center of the story. The major characters--blacksmiths, glove makers, teamsters, printers, and the like--have been mostly forgotten, but as Carter convincingly argues, their collective contribution to American Social Christianity was no less significant than that of Walter Rauschenbusch or Jane Addams. Leading readers into the thick of late-19th-century Chicago's tumultuous history, Carter shows that countless working-class believers participated in the heated debates over the implications of Christianity for industrializing society, often with as much fervor as they did in other contests over wages and the length of the workday. The city's trade unionists, socialists, and anarchists advanced theological critiques of laissez faire capitalism and protested "scab ministers" who cozied up to the business elite. Their criticisms compounded church leaders' anxieties about losing the poor, such that by the turn-of-the-century many leading Christians were arguing that the only way to salvage hopes of a Christian America was for the churches to soften their position on "the labor question." As denomination after denomination did just that, it became apparent that the Social Gospel was, indeed, ascendant--from below. At a time when the fate of the labor movement and rising economic inequality are once more pressing social concerns, Union Made opens the door for a new way forward--by changing the way we think about the past.

American Jews and America's Game

Voices of a Growing Legacy in Baseball
Author: Larry Ruttman
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803264828
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 438
View: 5446

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Most fans don’t know how far the Jewish presence in baseball extends beyond a few famous players such as Greenberg, Rosen, Koufax, Holtzman, Green, Ausmus, Youkilis, Braun, and Kinsler. In fact, that presence extends to the baseball commissioner Bud Selig, labor leaders Marvin Miller and Don Fehr, owners Jerry Reinsdorf and Stuart Sternberg, officials Theo Epstein and Mark Shapiro, sportswriters Murray Chass, Ross Newhan, Ira Berkow, and Roger Kahn, and even famous Jewish baseball fans like Alan Dershowitz and Barney Frank. The life stories of these and many others, on and off the field, have been compiled from nearly fifty in-depth interviews and arranged by decade in this edifying and entertaining work of oral and cultural history. In American Jews and America’s Game each person talks about growing up Jewish and dealing with Jewish identity, assimilation, intermarriage, future viability, religious observance, anti-Semitism, and Israel. Each tells about being in the midst of the colorful pantheon of players who, over the past seventy-five years or more, have made baseball what it is. Their stories tell, as no previous book has, the history of the larger-than-life role of Jews in America’s pastime.