The British Working Class 1832-1940


Author: Andrew August
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317877977
Category: History
Page: 296
View: 5734

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In this insightful new study, Andrew August examines the British working class in the period when Britain became a mature industrial power, working men and women dominated massive new urban populations, and the extension of suffrage brought them into the political nation for the first time. Framing his subject chronologically, but treating it thematically, August gives a vivid account of working class life between the mid-nineteenth and mid-twentieth centuries, examining the issues and concerns central to working-class identity. Identifying shared patterns of experience in the lives of workers, he avoids the limitations of both traditional historiography dominated by economic determinism and party politics, and the revisionism which too readily dismisses the importance of class in British society.

Currents of Radicalism

Popular Radicalism, Organised Labour and Party Politics in Britain, 1850-1914
Author: Eugenio F. Biagini,Alastair J. Reid
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521394550
Category: History
Page: 305
View: 1810

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'Those who were originally called radicals and afterwards reformers, are called Chartists', declared Thomas Duncombe before Parliament in 1842, a comment which can be adapted for a later period and as a description of this collection of papers: 'those who were originally called Chartists were afterwards called Liberal and Labour activists'. In other words, the central argument of this book is that there was a substantial continuity in popular radicalism throughout the nineteenth and into the twentieth century. The papers stress both the popular elements in Gladstonian Liberalism and the radical liberal elements in the early Labour party. The first part of the book focuses on the continuity of popular attitudes across the commonly-assumed mid-century divide, with studies of significant personalities and movements, as well as a local case study. The second part examines the strong links between Gladstonian Liberalism and the working classes, looking in particular at labour law, taxation, and the Irish crisis. The final part assesses the impact of radical traditions on early Labour politics, in Parliament, the unions, and local government. The same attitudes towards liberty, the rule of law, and local democracy are highlighted throughout, and new questions are therefore posed about the major transitions in the popular politics of the period.

Democratisation in Britain

Elites, Civil Society and Reform Since 1800
Author: John Garrard
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 1137170409
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 1090

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Democratisation in Britain is a novel reinterpretation of British social and political history since 1800 in light of the continuing debate about democratisation. As such, the book goes far beyond standard histories of political reform. In common with the politics in Northern Europe, North America and Australasia, Britain's democratisation began early and in highly favourable circumstances. The process took place in stages, only half-consciously and in the context of a generally benign economic cycle. The country possessed a vibrant civil society at most levels of its adult population, along with a flexible, competitive and opportunistic set of political elites. Partly as a result, the popular expectations and demands released by democratisation were modest and untroublesome. Countries undergoing democratisation since 1918 have been far less fortunate, and the process in thereby much more difficult. Thus this book may be seen as portraying an 'ideal type' against which to compare and contrast these later experiences. Democratisation in Britain combines the disciplines of political science and history, and will be of interest to scholars and students in both fields.

Popular Politics in Nineteenth Century England


Author: Rohan McWilliam,Rohan Mcwilliam
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134839898
Category: History
Page: 144
View: 5375

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Popular Politics in Nineteenth Century England provides an accessible introduction to the culture of English popular politics between 1815 and 1900, the period from Luddism to the New Liberalism. This is an area that has attracted great historical interest and has undergone fundamental revision in the last two decades. Did the industrial revolution create the working class movement or was liberalism (which transcended class divisions) the key mode of political argument? Rohan McWilliam brings this central debate up to date for students of Nineteenth Century British History. He assesses popular ideology in relation to the state, the nation, gender and the nature of party formation, and reveals a much richer social history emerging in the light of recent historiographical developments.

A History of the British Labour Party, Third Edition


Author: Andrew Thorpe
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 1137248157
Category: History
Page: 408
View: 9324

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Thorpe's book is widely seen as the best single-volume study of the whole of the Labour party's history. Now thoroughly updated in the light of ongoing historiographical debates, this third edition brings the story up to the present with new and revised chapters on the development of 'New Labour' and the legacy of the Blair government.

Why Nations Fail

The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty
Author: Daron Acemoglu,James A. Robinson
Publisher: Crown Books
ISBN: 0307719227
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 529
View: 4334

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An award-winning professor of economics at MIT and a Harvard University political scientist and economist evaluate the reasons that some nations are poor while others succeed, outlining provocative perspectives that support theories about the importance of institutions. Reprint.

The Origins of Nazi Genocide

From Euthanasia to the Final Solution
Author: Henry Friedlander
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 080786160X
Category: History
Page: 448
View: 6651

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Tracing the rise of racist and eugenic ideologies, Henry Friedlander explores in chilling detail how the Nazi program of secretly exterminating the handicapped and disabled evolved into the systematic destruction of Jews and Gypsies. He describes how the so-called euthanasia of the handicapped provided a practical model for the later mass murder, thereby initiating the Holocaust. The Nazi regime pursued the extermination of Jews, Gypsies, and the handicapped based on a belief in the biological, and thus absolute, inferiority of those groups. To document the connection between the assault on the handicapped and the Final Solution, Friedlander shows how the legal restrictions and exclusionary policies of the 1930s, including mass sterilization, led to mass murder during the war. He also makes clear that the killing centers where the handicapped were gassed and cremated served as the models for the extermination camps. Based on extensive archival research, the book also analyzes the involvement of the German bureaucracy and judiciary, the participation of physicians and scientists, and the nature of popular opposition.

British Friendly Societies, 1750-1914


Author: S. Cordery
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230598048
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 230
View: 5806

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The first monograph on this topic since 1961, this book provides an innovative interpretation of the Friendly Societies in Britain from the perspectives on social, gender and political history. It establishes the central role of the Friendly Societies in the political activism of British workers, changing understandings of masculinity and femininity, the ritualised expression of social tensions and the origins of the welfare state.

Anarchism and Syndicalism in the Colonial and Postcolonial World, 1870-1940

The Praxis of National Liberation, Internationalism, and Social Revolution
Author: Steven Hirsch,Lucien van der Walt
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004188495
Category: History
Page: 431
View: 495

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Before communism, anarchism and syndicalism were central to labour and the Left in the colonial and postcolonial world.Using studies from Africa,Asia, Eastern Europe, and Latin America, this groundbreaking volume examines the revolutionary libertarian Left's class politics and anti-colonialism in the first globalization and imperialism(1870/1930).

Ours to Master and to Own

Workers' Control from the Commune to the Present
Author: Immanuel Ness,Dario Azzellini
Publisher: Haymarket Books
ISBN: 160846119X
Category: History
Page: 443
View: 1874

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From the very dawn of the industrial epoch, wage earners have organised themselves into unions, fought bitter strikes and even gone so far as to challenge the premises of the system by enacting democratic self-management aimed at controlling production. A groundbreaking volume on workers' history, Ours to Master and to Own illuminates this under-appreciated and under-investigated aspect of working-class resistance.

The International Anarchist Movement in Late Victorian London (RLE: Terrorism and Insurgency)


Author: Hermia Oliver
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781138899742
Category:
Page: 192
View: 8251

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This book traces the history of the London anarchist movement and stress the complex network continuing to link it closely with European countries and North America. At the time of original publication in 1983, fresh biographical material concerning the chief British converts, threw new light on the Greenwich Park bomb of 1894. The study analyses anarchist view on education, work, trade unions, marriage and alternatives to the centralised social and political system established by western capitalism.

Alien Policy in Belgium, 1840-1940

The Creation of Guest Workers, Refugees and Illegal Aliens
Author: Frank Caestecker
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 9781571819864
Category: History
Page: 330
View: 6791

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Belgium has a unique place in the history of migration in that it was the first among industrialized nations in Continental Europe to develop into an immigrant society. In the nineteenth century Italians, Jews, Poles, Czechs, and North Africans settled in Belgium to work in industry and commerce. They were followed by Russians in the 1920s and Germans in the 1930s who were seeking a safe haven from persecution by totalitarian regimes. In the nineteenth century immigrants were to a larger extent integrated into Belgian society: they were denied political rights but participated on equal terms with Belgians in social life. This changed radically in the twentieth century; by 1940 the rights of aliens were severely curtailed, while those of Belgian citizens, in particular in the social domain, were extended. While the state evolved into a "welfare state" for its citizens it became more of a police state for immigrants. The state only tolerated immigrants who were prepared to carry out those jobs that were shunned by the Belgians. Under the pressure of public opinion, an exception was made in the cases of thousands of Jewish refugees that had fled from Nazi Germany. However, other immigrants were subjected to harsh regulations and in fact became the outcasts of twentieth-century Belgian liberal society. This remarkable study examines in depth and over a long time span how (anti-) alien policies were transformed, resulting in an illiberal exclusion of foreigners at the same time as democratization and the welfare state expanded. In this respect Belgium is certainly not unique but offers an interesting case study of developments that are characteristic for Europe as a whole. Frank Caesteckeris senior researcher at the University of Ghent, Department of Modern and Contemporary History.

Feminism and Democracy

Women's Suffrage and Reform Politics in Britain, 1900-1918
Author: Sandra Stanley Holton
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521521215
Category: History
Page: 220
View: 1408

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Offers a reinterpretation of the women's suffrage movement in Britain by focusing on lesser-known provincial suffragists. Specifically considers a group identified by the author as the "democratic suffragists" who guided the campaigns of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies.