Population and Society

Essential Readings
Author: Frank Trovato
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195439786
Category: Social Science
Page: 424
View: 3085

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This second edition brings together a broad selection of classic and contemporary works in the study of human population and society. Integrating a unique global perspective throughout, the text examines the foundational principles and theories of demography before addressing such topics as the relationship between individual action and demographic phenomena; principles of aging composition; nuptiality and family processes; fertility, mortality, and migration; environmental issues; and population policy concerns. Introductory overviews for each of the ten sections establish common underlying themes and give students a contextual framework for the readings that follow. With twenty-three new readings by Canadian and international scholars and a fully updated pedagogical program, this comprehensive collection is an essential resource for studying population and society.

Environment and Society

A Reader
Author: Christopher Schlottmann,Colin Jerolmack,Anne Rademacher
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479805327
Category: Political Science
Page: 416
View: 2840

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Environment and Society connects the core themes of environmental studies to the urgent issues and debates of the twenty-first century. In an era marked by climate change, rapid urbanization, and resource scarcity, environmental studies has emerged as a crucial arena of study. Assembling canonical and contemporary texts, this volume presents a systematic survey of concepts and issues central to the environment in society, such as: social mobilization on behalf of environmental objectives; the relationships between human population, economic growth and stresses on the planet’s natural resources; debates about the relative effects of collective and individual action; and unequal distribution of the social costs of environmental degradation. Organized around key themes, with each section featuring questions for debate and suggestions for further reading, the book introduces students to the history of environmental studies, and demonstrates how the field’s interdisciplinary approach uniquely engages the essential issues of the present. Instructor's Guide

The Changing Face of Canada

Essential Readings in Population
Author: Roderic P. Beaujot,Donald W. Kerr
Publisher: Canadian Scholars’ Press
ISBN: 1551303221
Category: History
Page: 389
View: 2495

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Canadian society is rapidly changing. This concise, up-to-date volume masterfully captures this change. The work of leading Canadian demographers is featured and it promises to be an exciting new entry in Canadian population studies

Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection


Author: Peter Godfrey-Smith
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191567787
Category: Philosophy
Page: 224
View: 8249

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In 1859 Darwin described a deceptively simple mechanism that he called "natural selection," a combination of variation, inheritance, and reproductive success. He argued that this mechanism was the key to explaining the most puzzling features of the natural world, and science and philosophy were changed forever as a result. The exact nature of the Darwinian process has been controversial ever since, however. Godfrey-Smith draws on new developments in biology, philosophy of science, and other fields to give a new analysis and extension of Darwin's idea. The central concept used is that of a "Darwinian population," a collection of things with the capacity to undergo change by natural selection. From this starting point, new analyses of the role of genes in evolution, the application of Darwinian ideas to cultural change, and "evolutionary transitions" that produce complex organisms and societies are developed. Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection will be essential reading for anyone interested in evolutionary theory

International Handbook of Population Aging


Author: Peter Uhlenberg
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781402083563
Category: Family & Relationships
Page: 769
View: 5220

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The International Handbook of Population Aging examines research on a wide array of the profound implications of population aging. It demonstrates how the world is changing through population aging, and how demography is changing in response to it.

More

Population, Nature, and What Women Want
Author: Robert Engelman
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 9781597264464
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 3700

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In the capital of Ghana, a teenager nicknamed “Condom Sister” trolls the streets to educate other young people about contraception. Her work and her own aspirations point to a remarkable shift not only in the West African nation, where just a few decades ago women had nearly seven children on average, but around the globe. While world population continues to grow, family size keeps dropping in countries as diverse as Switzerland and South Africa. The phenomenon has some lamenting the imminent extinction of humanity, while others warn that our numbers will soon outgrow the planet’s resources. Robert Engelman offers a decidedly different vision—one that celebrates women’s widespread desire for smaller families. Mothers aren’t seeking more children, he argues, but more for their children. If they’re able to realize their intentions, we just might suffer less climate change, hunger, and disease, not to mention sky-high housing costs and infuriating traffic jams. In More, Engelman shows that this three-way dance between population, women’s autonomy, and the natural world is as old as humanity itself. He traces pivotal developments in our history that set population—and society—on its current trajectory, from hominids’ first steps on two feet to the persecution of “witches” in Europe to the creation of modern contraception. Both personal and sweeping, More explores how population growth has shaped modern civilization—and humanity as we know it. The result is a mind-stretching exploration of parenthood, sex, and culture through the ages. Yet for all its fascinating historical detail, More is primarily about the choices we face today. Whether society supports women to have children when and only when they choose to will not only shape their lives, but the world all our children will inherit.

Immigration and Population


Author: Stephanie A. Bohon,Meghan E. Conley
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745689000
Category: Social Science
Page: 200
View: 7081

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Immigration is the primary cause of population change in developed countries and a major component of population change in many developing countries. This clear and perceptive text discusses how immigration impacts population size, composition, and distribution. The authors address major socio-political issues of immigration through the lens of demography, bringing demographic insights to bear on a number of pressing questions currently discussed in the media, such as: Does immigration stimulate the economy? Do immigrants put an excessive strain on health care systems? How does the racial and ethnic composition of immigrants challenge what it means to be American (or French or German)? By systematically exploring demographic topics such as fertility, health, education, and age and sex structures, the book provides students of immigration with a broader understanding of the impact of immigration on populations and offers new ways to think about immigration and society.

Population and Society

An Introduction to Demography
Author: Dudley L. Poston, Jr,Leon F. Bouvier
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316883175
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
View: 9060

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This comprehensive yet accessible textbook is an ideal resource for undergraduate and graduate students taking their first course in demography. Clearly explaining technical demographic issues without using extensive mathematics, Population and Society is sociologically oriented, but incorporates a variety of social sciences in its approach, including economics, political science, geography, and history. It highlights the significant impact of decision-making at the individual level - especially regarding fertility, but also mortality and migration - on population change. The text engages students by providing numerous examples of demography's practical applications in their lives, and demonstrates the extent of its relevance by examining a wide selection of data from the United States, Africa, Asia, and Europe. This thoroughly revised edition includes four new chapters, covering topics such as race and sexuality, and encourages students to consider the broad implications of population growth and change for global challenges such as environmental degradation.

Provinces

Canadian Provincial Politics, Second Edition
Author: Christopher Dunn
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442608463
Category: Political Science
Page: 544
View: 8595

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Provinces is both a study of Canadian provincial government and a review of comparative politics. As such, it represents a long overdue return to the comparative tradition with its emphasis on subject-specific studies across the country. The chapters in this revised edition of Provinces, each of which has been written for the book by a leading scholar, are arranged according to four major sections?political life, institutions, public administration, and public policy?making the book highly suitable for those interested in areas beyond provincial politics. At the same time, the adopted comparative approach reveals a wealth of insight into Canadian politics at the beginning of the new millennium. This new edition covers some of the vital concerns of our time: a disquiet about the quality of democracy, concern about women?s place in provincial societies, interest in the nature and potential of governance in the north, unease on the question of the fiscal imbalance between all orders of government, a sensitivity to the needs of cities and communities, assessment of the retrenchment of the state, and consideration of the policy futures influenced by the changing demography of the provinces. Special Combined Price: Provinces, second edition may be ordered together with The Provincial State in Canada: Politics in the Provinces and Territories at a special discounted price. In order to secure the package price, the following ISBN must be used when ordering: 978-1-55402-587-9.

Mabiki

Infanticide and Population Growth in Eastern Japan, 1660-1950
Author: Fabian Drixler
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520272439
Category: History
Page: 417
View: 7930

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This book tells the story of a society reversing deeply held worldviews and revolutionizing its demography. In parts of eighteenth-century Japan, couples raised only two or three children. As villages shrank and domain headcounts dwindled, posters of child-murdering she-devils began to appear, and governments offered to pay their subjects to have more children. In these pages, the long conflict over the meaning of infanticide comes to life once again. Those who killed babies saw themselves as responsible parents to their chosen children. Those who opposed infanticide redrew the boundaries of humanity so as to encompass newborn infants and exclude those who would not raise them. In Eastern Japan, the focus of this book, population growth resumed in the nineteenth century. According to its village registers, more and more parents reared all their children. Others persisted in the old ways, leaving traces of hundreds of thousands of infanticides in the statistics of the modern Japanese state. Nonetheless, by 1925, total fertility rates approached six children per women in the very lands where raising four had once been considered profligate. This reverse fertility transition suggests that the demographic history of the world is more interesting than paradigms of unidirectional change would have us believe, and that the future of fertility and population growth may yet hold many surprises.

Population and Development


Author: W.T.S. Gould
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317638581
Category: Science
Page: 304
View: 7836

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The new edition of Population and Development offers an up-to-date perspective on one of the critical issues at the heart of the problems of development for all countries, and especially those that seek to implement major economic and social change: the reflexive relationships between a country’s population and its development. How does population size, distribution, age structure and skill base affect development patterns and prospects? How has global development been affected by regional population change? Retaining the structure of the well-received first edition, the book has been substantially revised and updated. The opening chapters of the book establish the theoretical and historical basis for examining the basic reflexive relationship, with exploration of the Malthusian perspective and its critics to examine how population change affects development, and exploration of the Demographic Transition Model and its critics to examine how, why and to what extent development drives population change. These are followed by empirically rich chapters on each of the main components of population change – mortality, fertility, internal and international migration, age structures and skill base – each elaborating key ideas with detailed and contrasting case studies from all regions of the developing world. There are concluding and more integrative discussions on population policies and global population futures. Bringing together Population Studies, Development Studies and Geography, the new edition of Population and Development is a key resource for undergraduate and postgraduate students across a range of programmes with specialist modules on population change. There is a large bibliography, with major new sections identifying a wide range of online resources for further study. Each chapter contains a reading guide with discussion questions. The text is enlivened by a number of case studies from around the world, most of which are new or have been substantially revised. Written by a leading international scholar in population, the book successfully integrates cutting-edge academic research with the focus and efforts of international development agencies.

Fewer

How the New Demography of Depopulation Will Shape Our Future
Author: Ben J. Wattenberg
Publisher: Ivan R Dee
ISBN: N.A
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 241
View: 5887

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"What Mr. Wattenberg has to say about the impact of declining world population will underline its profound impact on the lives of people everywhere - from the dominance of the elderly and their demands on the resources of their governments, to the enormous potential of China and India, to the relatively privileged position of the United States vis-a-vis the major world powers. In an age already beset by a transformation in world politics, Fewer will help explain current trends as well as sketch the shape of our future."--BOOK JACKET.

Essential Readings in Health Policy and Law


Author: Joel B. Teitelbaum,Sara E. Wilensky
Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Publishers
ISBN: 0763738514
Category: Health & Fitness
Page: 447
View: 6447

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This compilation of carefully selected readings is meant to allow for deeper analysis of the issues covered in Essentials of Health Policy and Law, yet also serves as an excellent complement to any text on health policy.

Women, Population and Global Crisis

A Political-Economic Analysis
Author: Asoka Bandarage
Publisher: Zed Books
ISBN: 9781856494281
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 384
View: 574

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It has been widely assumed that over-population is one of the root causes of global crisis; even amongst feminist and environmental movements, the common wisdom on population has never been seriously critiqued. This book provides that critique; it gives a historical overview of the population question and places the population-poverty-environment-security debate within a broad theoretical perspective. The first part of the book looks at conventional ideologies of population control - from malthusianism to the contraceptive revolution. In part two, the author develops an alternative analysis of 'overpopulation' - exploring the roots of the einvronmental crisis, violence and inequality en route. Critiquing capitalism, industrialism, patriarchy and white supremacy, she shows how population control acts as another dimension of our essentially hierarchical world order - and one that is moving us inexorably towards violence and destruction. Finally, Asoka Bandarage explores new global visions and efforts towards peace, justice and ecology - efforts that place human and planetary reproduction above economic production. Arguing for a new partnership paradigm which stresses the interconnectedness of life, the book's political significance lies in the synthesis of third world, feminist, socialist and ecological thinking and solutions. A major contribution to the socio-historical analysis of population-poverty-environment relations, this book cuts across the North/South divide bringing to light the dialectics of gender, race and class on a global scale. As such it is essential reading for students and academics in women's, development and environment studies as well as in philosophy, social theory and courses on ethnic relations.

The Escape from Hunger and Premature Death, 1700-2100

Europe, America, and the Third World
Author: Robert William Fogel
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521004886
Category: History
Page: 191
View: 5780

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A compelling new study from Nobel laureate Robert Fogel, examining health, nutrition and technology over the last three centuries and beyond. It will be essential reading for all those interested in economics, demography, history and health care policy.

A Pivotal Moment

Population, Justice, and the Environmental Challenge
Author: Laurie Ann Mazur
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 9781610911412
Category: Health & Fitness
Page: 432
View: 7324

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Through a series of essays by leading demographers, environmentalists and reproductive health advocates, A Pivotal Moment offers a new perspective on the complex connection between population dynamics and environmental quality. It presents the latest research on the relationship between population growth and climate change, ecosystem health and other environmental issues. It surveys the new demographic landscape—in which population growth rates have fallen, but human numbers continue to increase. It looks back at the lessons learned from half a century of population policy—and forward to propose twenty-first century population policies that are sustainable and just. A Pivotal Moment puts forth the concept of “population justice,” which is inspired by reproductive justice and environmental justice movements. Population justice holds that inequality is a root cause of both rapid population growth and environmental degradation. As the authors in this volume explain, to slow population growth and build a sustainable future, women and men need access to voluntary family planning and other reproductive health services. They need education and employment opportunities, especially for women. Population justice means tackling the deep inequities—both gender and economic—that are associated with rapid population growth and unsustainable resource consumption. Where family planning is available, where couples are confident their children will survive, where girls go to school, where young men and women have economic opportunity—there couples will have healthier and smaller families.

Too Many People?

Population, Immigration, and the Environmental Crisis
Author: Ian Angus,Simon Butler
Publisher: Haymarket Books
ISBN: 1608461408
Category: Nature
Page: 266
View: 8007

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A clear, evocative, and well-documented refutation of the idea that overpopulation is at the root of many environmental problems.