Population and Society

Essential Readings
Author: Frank Trovato
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195439786
Category: Social Science
Page: 424
View: 8440

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This second edition brings together a broad selection of classic and contemporary works in the study of human population and society. Integrating a unique global perspective throughout, the text examines the foundational principles and theories of demography before addressing such topics as the relationship between individual action and demographic phenomena; principles of aging composition; nuptiality and family processes; fertility, mortality, and migration; environmental issues; and population policy concerns. Introductory overviews for each of the ten sections establish common underlying themes and give students a contextual framework for the readings that follow. With twenty-three new readings by Canadian and international scholars and a fully updated pedagogical program, this comprehensive collection is an essential resource for studying population and society.

Environment and Society

A Reader
Author: Christopher Schlottmann,Colin Jerolmack,Anne Rademacher
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479801933
Category: Nature
Page: 416
View: 3891

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Environment and Society connects the core themes of environmental studies to the urgent issues and debates of the twenty-first century. In an era marked by climate change, rapid urbanization, and resource scarcity, environmental studies has emerged as a crucial arena of study. Assembling canonical and contemporary texts, this volume presents a systematic survey of concepts and issues central to the environment in society, such as: social mobilization on behalf of environmental objectives; the relationships between human population, economic growth and stresses on the planet’s natural resources; debates about the relative effects of collective and individual action; and unequal distribution of the social costs of environmental degradation. Organized around key themes, with each section featuring questions for debate and suggestions for further reading, the book introduces students to the history of environmental studies, and demonstrates how the field’s interdisciplinary approach uniquely engages the essential issues of the present. Instructor's Guide

Israel's changing society

population, ethnicity, and development
Author: Calvin Goldscheider
Publisher: Westview Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 271
View: 5441

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This book provides the most up-to-date assessment of Israel’s society today, portraying the country’s ethnic diversity, its economy, and demographic changes. Revealing linkages between demographic transformation and socioeconomic change, Goldscheider shows how ethnic group formation emerged in Israel to create the present mix of Jewish and Arab populations. He also reviews the policies of Palestinian and Israeli governments concerning immigration, describing the ways in which socioeconomic development within Israel, urbanization, and industrialization have evolved through the use of outside capital and increasing dependency.The book reveals two unique sets of processes about Israel today. The first concerns important changes in marriage, family and intermarriage, educational attainment and occupational achievement, ethnic politics, religion, and the changing role of women. A second but related concern pertains to the social and economic contexts of community life. Here Goldscheider investigates rapid change among Israel’s major urban centers, towns, and agricultural centers, including the Kibbutz as well as Arab communities.In concluding chapters, the author discusses the role of government in shaping population policy, including health, fertility, and contraceptive and abortion issues. He also describes the influence of Jewish communities outside of Israel and the impact of the Middle East conflict with Arab states on Israel’s domestic policy as well as the conflict with populations in territories administered by Israel since 1967.Likely to be a standard reference for years to come, the book is essential reading for political scientists, sociologists, anthropologists, and historians concerned with Israel’s politics and society.

The Changing Face of Canada

Essential Readings in Population
Author: Roderic P. Beaujot,Donald W. Kerr
Publisher: Canadian Scholars’ Press
ISBN: 1551303221
Category: History
Page: 389
View: 8273

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Canadian society is rapidly changing. This concise, up-to-date volume masterfully captures this change. The work of leading Canadian demographers is featured and it promises to be an exciting new entry in Canadian population studies

International Handbook of Population Aging


Author: Peter Uhlenberg
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781402083563
Category: Family & Relationships
Page: 769
View: 2646

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The International Handbook of Population Aging examines research on a wide array of the profound implications of population aging. It demonstrates how the world is changing through population aging, and how demography is changing in response to it.

Population and Development


Author: W.T.S. Gould
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317638581
Category: Science
Page: 304
View: 2897

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The new edition of Population and Development offers an up-to-date perspective on one of the critical issues at the heart of the problems of development for all countries, and especially those that seek to implement major economic and social change: the reflexive relationships between a country’s population and its development. How does population size, distribution, age structure and skill base affect development patterns and prospects? How has global development been affected by regional population change? Retaining the structure of the well-received first edition, the book has been substantially revised and updated. The opening chapters of the book establish the theoretical and historical basis for examining the basic reflexive relationship, with exploration of the Malthusian perspective and its critics to examine how population change affects development, and exploration of the Demographic Transition Model and its critics to examine how, why and to what extent development drives population change. These are followed by empirically rich chapters on each of the main components of population change – mortality, fertility, internal and international migration, age structures and skill base – each elaborating key ideas with detailed and contrasting case studies from all regions of the developing world. There are concluding and more integrative discussions on population policies and global population futures. Bringing together Population Studies, Development Studies and Geography, the new edition of Population and Development is a key resource for undergraduate and postgraduate students across a range of programmes with specialist modules on population change. There is a large bibliography, with major new sections identifying a wide range of online resources for further study. Each chapter contains a reading guide with discussion questions. The text is enlivened by a number of case studies from around the world, most of which are new or have been substantially revised. Written by a leading international scholar in population, the book successfully integrates cutting-edge academic research with the focus and efforts of international development agencies.

More

Population, Nature, and What Women Want
Author: Robert Engelman
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 9781597264464
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 2245

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In the capital of Ghana, a teenager nicknamed “Condom Sister” trolls the streets to educate other young people about contraception. Her work and her own aspirations point to a remarkable shift not only in the West African nation, where just a few decades ago women had nearly seven children on average, but around the globe. While world population continues to grow, family size keeps dropping in countries as diverse as Switzerland and South Africa. The phenomenon has some lamenting the imminent extinction of humanity, while others warn that our numbers will soon outgrow the planet’s resources. Robert Engelman offers a decidedly different vision—one that celebrates women’s widespread desire for smaller families. Mothers aren’t seeking more children, he argues, but more for their children. If they’re able to realize their intentions, we just might suffer less climate change, hunger, and disease, not to mention sky-high housing costs and infuriating traffic jams. In More, Engelman shows that this three-way dance between population, women’s autonomy, and the natural world is as old as humanity itself. He traces pivotal developments in our history that set population—and society—on its current trajectory, from hominids’ first steps on two feet to the persecution of “witches” in Europe to the creation of modern contraception. Both personal and sweeping, More explores how population growth has shaped modern civilization—and humanity as we know it. The result is a mind-stretching exploration of parenthood, sex, and culture through the ages. Yet for all its fascinating historical detail, More is primarily about the choices we face today. Whether society supports women to have children when and only when they choose to will not only shape their lives, but the world all our children will inherit.

Population 10 Billion


Author: Danny Dorling
Publisher: Constable
ISBN: 1780338783
Category: Fiction
Page: 160
View: 9360

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Before May 2011 the top demographics experts of the United Nations had suggested that world population would peak at 9.1 billion in 2100, and then fall to 8.5 billion people by 2150. In contrast, the 2011 revision suggested that 9.1 billion would be achieved much earlier, maybe by 2050 or before, and by 2100 there would be 10.1 billion of us. What's more, they implied that global human population might still be slightly rising in our total numbers a century from now. So what shall we do? Are there too many people on the planet? Is this the end of life as we know it? Distinguished geographer Professor Danny Dorling thinks we should not worry so much and that, whatever impending doom may be around the corner, we will deal with it when it comes. In a series of fascinating chapters he charts the rise of the human race from its origins to its end-point of population 10 billion. Thus he shows that while it took until about 1988 to reach 5 billion we reached 6 billion by 2000, 7 billion eleven years later and will reach 8 billion by 2025. By recording how we got here, Dorling is able to show us the key issues that we face in the coming decades: how we will deal with scarcity of resources; how our cities will grow and become more female; why the change that we should really prepare for is the population decline that will occur after 10 billion. Population 10 Billion is a major work by one of the world's leading geographers and will change the way you think about the future. Packed full of counter-intuitive ideas and observations, this book is a tool kit to prepare for the future and to help us ask the right questions

Mabiki

Infanticide and Population Growth in Eastern Japan, 1660-1950
Author: Fabian Drixler
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520272439
Category: History
Page: 417
View: 8333

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This book tells the story of a society reversing deeply held worldviews and revolutionizing its demography. In parts of eighteenth-century Japan, couples raised only two or three children. As villages shrank and domain headcounts dwindled, posters of child-murdering she-devils began to appear, and governments offered to pay their subjects to have more children. In these pages, the long conflict over the meaning of infanticide comes to life once again. Those who killed babies saw themselves as responsible parents to their chosen children. Those who opposed infanticide redrew the boundaries of humanity so as to encompass newborn infants and exclude those who would not raise them. In Eastern Japan, the focus of this book, population growth resumed in the nineteenth century. According to its village registers, more and more parents reared all their children. Others persisted in the old ways, leaving traces of hundreds of thousands of infanticides in the statistics of the modern Japanese state. Nonetheless, by 1925, total fertility rates approached six children per women in the very lands where raising four had once been considered profligate. This reverse fertility transition suggests that the demographic history of the world is more interesting than paradigms of unidirectional change would have us believe, and that the future of fertility and population growth may yet hold many surprises.

Political Sociology and the People's Health


Author: Jason Beckfield
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019049249X
Category: Medical
Page: 176
View: 9106

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A social epidemiologist looks at health inequalities in terms of the upstream factors that produced them. A political sociologist sees these same inequalities as products of institutions that unequally allocate power and social goods. Neither is wrong -- but can the two talk to one another? In a stirring new synthesis, Political Sociology and the People's Health advances the debate over social inequalities in health by offering a new set of provocative hypotheses around how health is distributed in and across populations. It joins political sociology's macroscopic insights into social policy, labor markets, and the racialized and gendered state with social epidemiology's conceptualizations and measurements of populations, etiologic periods, and distributions. The result is a major leap forward in how we understand the relationships between institutions and inequalities -- and essential reading for those in public health, sociology, and beyond.

Population Geography

Tools and Issues
Author: K. Bruce Newbold
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442265329
Category: Social Science
Page: 366
View: 3489

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This text provides a comprehensive introduction to population geography, grounding students in the tools and techniques that are commonly used to describe and understand population concepts. Arguing that an understanding of population is essential to prepare for the future, Newbold provides undergraduates with a thorough grasp of the field.

Environment and Society

A Critical Introduction
Author: Paul Robbins,John Hintz,Sarah A. Moore
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118451562
Category: Science
Page: 350
View: 4542

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Substantially updated for the second edition, this engaging and innovative introduction to the environment and society uses key theoretical approaches to explore familiar objects. Features substantial revisions and updates for the second edition, including new chapters on E waste, mosquitoes and uranium, improved maps and graphics, new exercises, shorter theory chapters, and refocused sections on environmental solutions Discusses topics such as population and scarcity, commodities, environmental ethics, risks and hazards, and political economy and applies them to objects like bottled water, tuna, and trees Accessible for students, and accompanied by in-book and online resources including exercises and boxed discussions, an online test bank, notes, suggested reading, and website links for enhanced understanding Offers additional online support for instructors, including suggested teaching models, PowerPoint slides for each chapter with full-color graphics, and supplementary images and teaching material

Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth?

Demography and Politics in the Twenty-First Century
Author: Eric Kaufmann
Publisher: Profile Books
ISBN: 1847651941
Category: Religion
Page: 330
View: 9894

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Dawkins and Hitchens have convinced many western intellectuals that secularism is the way forward. But most people don't read their books before deciding whether to be religious. Instead, they inherit their faith from their parents, who often innoculate them against the elegant arguments of secularists. And what no one has noticed is that far from declining, the religious are expanding their share of the population: in fact, the more religious people are, the more children they have. The cumulative effect of immigration from religious countries, and religious fertility will be to reverse the secularisation process in the West. Not only will the religious eventually triumph over the non-religious, but it is those who are the most extreme in their beliefs who have the largest families. Within Judaism, the Ultra-Orthodox may achieve majority status over their liberal counterparts by mid-century. Islamist Muslims have won the culture war in much of the Muslim world, and their success provides a glimpse of what awaits the Christian West and Israel. Based on a wealth of demographic research, considering questions of multiculturalism and terrorism, Kaufmann examines the implications of the decline in liberal secularism as religious conservatism rises - and what this means for the future of western modernity.

Population Change in Canada


Author: Roderic P. Beaujot,Donald W. Kerr
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780199002627
Category: Canada
Page: 448
View: 2678

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Population Change in Canada offers a comprehensive, up-to-date survey of Canadian demography from the sixteenth century to the present day. Now in its third edition, this accessible and enlightening narrative provides students with the foundation they need to fully understand population changeand to prepare to meet its challenges both now and in the future.

Integrating Islam

Political and Religious Challenges in Contemporary France
Author: Jonathan Laurence,Justin Vaïsse
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 0815751524
Category: Religion
Page: 342
View: 2185

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Nearly five million Muslims call France home, the vast majority from former French colonies in North Africa. While France has successfully integrated waves of immigrants in the past, this new influx poses a new variety of challenges—much as it does in neighboring European countries. Alarmists view the growing role of Muslims in French society as a form of "reverse colonization"; they believe Muslim political and religious networks seek to undermine European rule of law or that fundamentalists are creating a society entirely separate from the mainstream. Integrating Islam portrays the more complex reality of integration's successes and failures in French politics and society. From intermarriage rates to economic indicators, the authors paint a comprehensive portrait of Muslims in France. Using original research, they devote special attention to the policies developed by successive French governments to encourage integration and discourage extremism. Because of the size of its Muslim population and its universalistic definition of citizenship, France is an especially good test case for the encounter of Islam and the West. Despite serious and sometimes spectacular problems, the authors see a "French Islam" slowly replacing "Islam in France"–in other words, the emergence of a religion and a culture that feels at home in, and is largely at peace with, its host society. Integrating Islam provides readers with a comprehensive view of the state of Muslim integration into French society that cannot be found anywhere else. It is essential reading for students of French politics and those studying the interaction of Islam and the West, as well as the general public.

Too Many People?

Population, Immigration, and the Environmental Crisis
Author: Ian Angus,Simon Butler
Publisher: Haymarket Books
ISBN: 1608461408
Category: Nature
Page: 266
View: 7814

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A clear, evocative, and well-documented refutation of the idea that overpopulation is at the root of many environmental problems.

Essential Readings in Health Policy and Law


Author: Joel B. Teitelbaum,Sara E. Wilensky
Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Publishers
ISBN: 0763738514
Category: Health & Fitness
Page: 447
View: 3501

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This compilation of carefully selected readings is meant to allow for deeper analysis of the issues covered in Essentials of Health Policy and Law, yet also serves as an excellent complement to any text on health policy.

Among the Hidden


Author: Margaret Peterson Haddix
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9780689848070
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 160
View: 1717

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In a future where the Population Police enforce the law limiting a family to only two children, Luke, an illegal third child, has lived all his twelve years in isolation and fear on his family's farm in this start to the Shadow Children series from Margaret Peterson Haddix. Luke has never been to school. He's never had a birthday party, or gone to a friend's house for an overnight. In fact, Luke has never had a friend. Luke is one of the shadow children, a third child forbidden by the Population Police. He's lived his entire life in hiding, and now, with a new housing development replacing the woods next to his family's farm, he is no longer even allowed to go outside. Then, one day Luke sees a girl's face in the window of a house where he knows two other children already live. Finally, he's met a shadow child like himself. Jen is willing to risk everything to come out of the shadows -- does Luke dare to become involved in her dangerous plan? Can he afford not to?