Perils of a Restless Planet

Scientific Perspectives on Natural Disasters
Author: Ernest Zebrowski
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521654883
Category: Nature
Page: 324
View: 8878

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Traces the process of scientific inquiry, technological innovation, and public policy used to deal with such natural disasters as epidemics, tornadoes, and tidal waves, focusing on actual events from ancient times to the present. UP.

A History of the Circle

Mathematical Reasoning and the Physical Universe
Author: Ernest Zebrowski
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813528984
Category: Mathematics
Page: 215
View: 836

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Ranging from ancient times to twentieth-century theories of time and space, looks at how exploring the circle has lead to increased knowledge about the physical universe.

Economic and Societal Impacts of Tornadoes


Author: Kevin Simmons,Daniel Sutter
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1935704028
Category: Science
Page: 296
View: 3973

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For almost a decade, economists Kevin M. Simmons and Daniel Sutter have been studying the economic effects and social consequences of the approximately 1,200 tornadoes that touch down across the United States annually. During this time, they have compiled information from sources such as NOAA and the U.S. Census Bureau to examine the casualties caused by tornadoes and to evaluate the National Weather Service (NWS)’s efforts to reduce these casualties. Their unique database has enabled this fascinating and game-changing study for meteorologists, social scientists, emergency managers, and everyone studying severe weather, policy, disaster management, or applied economics.

Category 5

The Story of Camille, Lessons Unlearned from America's Most Violent Hurricane
Author: Ernest Zebrowski,Judith A. Howard
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 9780472032402
Category: History
Page: 276
View: 6326

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Provides the epic story of Camille, the most violent hurricane ever to strike the United States, the aftermath of destruction she left behind on the coast of Louisiana and Mississippi, and the lessons she taught about the complexities of disaster management and their failures that were not heeded during relief efforts of Katrina.

Leadership in Disaster

Learning for a Future with Global Climate Change
Author: Raymond Murphy
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 0773577882
Category: Political Science
Page: 480
View: 8997

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The study looks into whether technological development inadvertently constructed new vulnerabilities to nature's forces, thereby manufacturing a natural disaster. As this extreme weather may foreshadow what will occur with global warming, Murphy's interviews also explore the politics, economics, ethics, and cultural predispositions underlying climate change, investigating how modern societies create both risks they assume are acceptable and the burden of managing them. An innovative comparison with Amish communities, where the same extreme weather had trivial consequences, is instructive for avoiding future socio-environmental calamities.

Limits of Global Governance


Author: Jim Whitman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134302231
Category: Political Science
Page: 184
View: 5086

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Are we creating an ungovernable world? Can we be confident that our existing modes of global governance are sufficient, or adaptable enough, to meet the challenges of globalization? This new study powerfully tackles these key questions, delivering a provocative examination of the cognitive, practical and political limits on our ability to exercise systems of regulation and control on the same scale as the globalizing forces already shaping the human condition. Key issues addressed include: * an examination of the many meanings of 'global governance' * a contextualised view of global governance within the complex interaction of human and natural systems * an analysis of global governance at a fundamental and conceptual level * a case study of disseminative systems and global governance This book is essential reading for those with research interests in global politics, international relations and globalization.

Hollywood Science

Movies, Science, and the End of the World
Author: Sidney Perkowitz
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231142811
Category: Science
Page: 272
View: 8690

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In this book, a scientist and dedicated film enthusiast discusses the portrayal of science in more than one hundred films, including science fiction, scientific biographies, and documentaries. Beginning with early films like Voyage to the Moon and Metropolis and concluding with more recent offerings like The Matrix, War of the Worlds, A Beautiful Mind, and An Inconvenient Truth, Sidney Perkowitz questions how much faith we can put into Hollywood's depiction of scientists and their work, how accurately these films capture scientific fact and theory, whether cataclysms like our collision with a comet can actually happen, and to what extent these films influence public opinion about science and the future. Bringing together history, scientific theory, and humorous observation, Hollywood Science features dozens of film stills and a list of the all-time best and worst science-fiction movies.

Warnings

The True Story of how Science Tamed the Weather
Author: Michael Ray Smith
Publisher: Greenleaf Book Group
ISBN: 1608320340
Category: Nature
Page: 286
View: 788

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From the heart of tornado alley, Smith takes us into the eye of America's most devastating storms and behind the scenes of some of the world's most renowned scientific institutions to uncover the relationship between mankind and the weather.

Need to Know

Vocation as the Heart of Christian Epistemology
Author: John G. Stackhouse Jr.
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199376972
Category: Religion
Page: 320
View: 9667

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How should a Christian think? If a serious Christian wants to think seriously about a serious subject--from considering how to vote in the next election to choosing a career; from deciding among scientific theories to selecting a mate; from weighing competing marketing proposals to discerning the best fitness plan--what does he or she do? This basic question is at the heart of a complex discourse: epistemology. A bold new statement of Christian epistemology, Need to Know presents a comprehensive, coherent, and clear model of responsible Christian thinking. Grounded in the best of the Christian theological tradition while being attentive to a surprising range of thinkers in the history of philosophy, natural science, social science, and culture, the book offers a scheme for drawing together experience, tradition, scholarship, art, and the Bible into a practical yet theoretically profound system of thinking about thinking. John Stackhouse's fundamental idea is as simple as it is startling: Since God calls human beings to do certain things in the world, God can be relied upon to supply the knowledge necessary for human beings to do those things. The classic Christian concept of vocation, then, supplies both the impetus and the assurance that faithful Christians can trust God to guide their thinking--on a "need to know" basis.

The End

Natural Disasters, Manmade Catastrophes, and the Future of Human Survival
Author: Marq de Villiers
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9781429934404
Category: Nature
Page: 368
View: 7590

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What is the fate of the world as we know it? Tsunamis, earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes, pandemics, cosmic radiation, gamma bursts from space, colliding comets, and asteroids—these things used to worry us from time to time, but now they have become the background noise of our culture. Are natural calamities indeed more probable, and more frequent, than they were? Are things getting worse? Are the boundaries between natural and human-caused calamities blurring? Are we part of the problem? If so, what can we do about it? In The End, award-winning writer Marq de Villiers examines these questions at a time when there is an urgent need to understand the perils that confront us, to act in such a way as best we can for the inevitable disasters when they come. We can do nothing about some natural calamities, but about others we can do a great deal. De Villiers helps us understand which is which, and lays out some provocative ideas for mitigating the damage all such calamities can inflict on us and our world. The End is a brilliant and challenging look at what lies ahead, and at what we can do to influence our future.

Ecology of Fear

Los Angeles And The Imagination Of Disaster
Author: Mike Davis
Publisher: Metropolitan Books
ISBN: 146686284X
Category: Science
Page: 496
View: 5897

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Los Angeles has become a magnet for the American apocalyptic imagination. Riot, fire, flood, earthquake...only locusts are missing from the almost biblical list of disasters that have struck the city in the 1990s. From Ventura to Laguna, more than one million Southern Californians have been directly touched by disaster-related death, injury, or damage to their homes and businesses. Middle-class apprehensions about angry underclasses are exceeded only by anxieties about blind thrust faults underlying downtown L.A. or about the firestorms that periodically incinerate Malibu. And the force of real catastrophe has been redoubled by the obsessive fictional destruction of Los Angeles--by aliens, comets, and twisters--in scores of novels and films. The former "Land of Sunshine" is now seen by much of the world, including many of L.A.'s increasingly nervous residents, as a veritable Book of the Apocalypse theme park. In this extraordinary book, Mike Davis, the author of City of Quartz and our most fascinating interpreter of the American metropolis, unravels the secret political history of disaster, real and imaginary, in Southern California. As he surveys the earthquakes of Santa Monica, the burning of Koreatown, the invasion of "man-eating" mountain lions, the movie Volcano, and even Los Angeles's underrated tornado problem, he exposes the deep complicity between social injustice and perceptions of natural disorder. Arguing that paranoia about nature obscures the fact that Los Angeles has deliberately put itself in harm's way, Davis reveals how market-driven urbanization has for generations transgressed against environmental common sense. And he shows that the floods, fires, and earthquakes reaped by the city were tragedies as avoidable--and unnatural--as the beating of Rodney King and the ensuing explosion in the streets. Rich with detail, bold and original, Ecology of Fear is a gripping reconnaissance into the urban future, an essential portrait of America at the millennium.

Learning From the Octopus

How Secrets from Nature Can Help Us Fight Terrorist Attacks, Natural Disasters, and Disease
Author: Rafe Sagarin
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465029817
Category: Science
Page: 320
View: 8283

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"How the study of ecology and evolution can fortify us against disaster and war"--

Disaster Response


Author: Fred C. Pampel
Publisher: Library in a Book
ISBN: N.A
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 298
View: 6119

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Provides an overview of emergency management and disaster response, including current laws and regulations, important events, biographical listings, and a directory of state, federal, and international agencies and organizations.

Environmental Hazards

Assessing Risk and Reducing Disaster
Author: Keith Smith
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136647147
Category: Science
Page: 504
View: 3817

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The much expanded sixth edition of Environmental Hazards provides a fully up-to-date overview of all the extreme events that threaten people and what they value in the 21st century. It integrates cutting-edge material from the physical and social sciences to illustrate how natural and human systems interact to place communities of all sizes, and at all stages of economic development, at risk. It also explains in detail the various measures available to reduce the ongoing losses to life and property. Part One of this established textbook defines basic concepts of hazard, risk, vulnerability and disaster. Attention is given to the evolution of theory, to the scales and patterns of disaster impact and to the optimum management strategies needed to minimize the future impact of damaging events. Part Two employs a consistent chapter structure to demonstrate how individual hazards, such as earthquakes, severe storms, floods and droughts, plus biophysical and technological processes, create distinctive impacts and challenges throughout the world. The ways in which different societies can make positive responses to these threats are placed firmly in the context of sustainable development and global environmental change. This extensively revised edition includes: A new concluding chapter that summarizes the globalization of hazard and critically examines the latest perspectives on climate-related disasters Fresh perspectives on the reliability of disaster data, disaster risk reduction, severe storms, droughts and technological hazards More boxed sections with a focus on both generic issues and the lessons to be learned from a carefully selected range of recent extreme events An annotated list of key resources, including further reading and relevant websites, for all chapters 183 diagrams, now in full colour, and available to download on: www.routledge.com/9780415681063/ Over 30 colour photographs and more than 1,000 references to some of the most significant and recent published material. Environmental Hazards is a clearly-written, authoritative account of the causes and consequences of the extreme natural and technological processes that cause death and destruction across the globe. It draws on the latest research findings to guide the reader from common problems, theories and policies to explore practical, real-world situations and solutions. This carefully structured and balanced book captures the complexity and dynamism of environmental hazards and has become essential reading for students of every kind seeking to understand this most important contemporary issue.

The Art of Being a Scientist

A Guide for Graduate Students and their Mentors
Author: Roel Snieder,Ken Larner
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107268680
Category: Science
Page: N.A
View: 3622

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This is a hands-on guide for graduate students and young researchers wishing to perfect the practical skills needed for a successful research career. By teaching junior scientists to develop effective research habits, the book helps to make the experience of graduate study a more efficient and rewarding one. The authors have taught a graduate course on the topics covered for many years, and provide a sample curriculum for instructors in graduate schools wanting to teach a similar course. Topics covered include choosing a research topic, department, and advisor; making workplans; the ethics of research; using scientific literature; perfecting oral and written communication; publishing papers; writing proposals; managing time effectively; and planning a scientific career and applying for jobs in research and industry. The wealth of advice is invaluable to students, junior researchers and mentors in all fields of science, engineering, and the humanities. The authors have taught a graduate course on the topics covered for many years, and provide a sample curriculum for instructors in graduate schools wanting to teach a similar course. The sample curriculum is available in the book as Appendix B, and as an online resource.