Outsider in the House


Author: Bernie Sanders
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 9781859841778
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 244
View: 387

Continue Reading →

Profiles the Vermont congressman who is the first Independent elected to the House in forty years

An Outsider in the White House

Jimmy Carter, His Advisors, and the Making of American Foreign Policy
Author: Betty Glad
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801448157
Category: History
Page: 398
View: 2671

Continue Reading →

Jimmy Carter entered the White House with a desire for a collegial staff that would aid his foreign-policy decision making. He wound up with a "team of rivals" who contended for influence and who fought over his every move regarding relations with the USSR, the Peoples' Republic of China, arms control, and other crucial foreign-policy issues. In two areas—the Camp David Accords and the return of the Canal to Panama—Carter's successes were attributable to his particular political skills and the assistance of Secretary of State Cyrus Vance and other professional diplomats. The ultimate victor in the other battles was Carter's national security advisor, Zbigniew Brzezinski, a motivated tactician. Carter, the outsider who had sought to change the political culture of the executive office, found himself dependent on the very insiders of the political and diplomatic establishment against whom he had campaigned. Based on recently declassified documents in the Carter Library, materials not previously noted in the Vance papers, and a wide variety of interviews, Betty Glad's An Outsider in the White House is a rich and nuanced depiction of the relationship between policy and character. It is also a poignant history of damaged ideals. Carter's absolute commitment to human rights foundered on what were seen as national security interests. New data from the archives reveal how Carter's government sought the aid of Pope John Paul II to undercut the human-rights efforts of the El Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero. A moralistic approach toward the Soviet Union undermined Carter's early desire to reduce East-West conflicts and cut nuclear arms. As a result, by 1980 the Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty (SALT) was in limbo, and a nuclear counterforce doctrine had been adopted. Near the end of Carter's single term in office Vance stepped down as secretary of state, in part because Brzezinski's "muscular diplomacy" had come to dominate Carter's foreign policy. When Vance's successor, Edmund Muskie, took over, the State Department was reduced to implementing policies made by Brzezinski and his allies. For Carter, the rivalry for influence in the White House was concluded and the results, as Glad shows, were a mixed record and an uncertain presidential legacy.

Outsider in the White House


Author: Bernard Sanders,Huck Gutman
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1784784184
Category: Legislators
Page: 346
View: 8577

Continue Reading →

Sanders tells the story of his remarkable career as a progressive socialist and outspoken dissident, using his experience to expose the bias and injustice within one of the worlds most powerful political systems. From his fight for a livable minimum wage, to campaigning on behalf of fair electoral politics, Sanders makes much-needed suggestions for tackling contemporary issues, an uplifting take on the potential for democracy to deliver political and social justice. The revised edition will include a new introduction from Sanders explaining what led to his run for the presidency and a substantial afterword written by John Nichols, the Washington Correspondent of The Nation, bringing Sanders's story forward from the late 1990s to the present.

Journeys into Darkness

Critical Essays on Gothic Horror
Author: James Goho
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442231467
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 234
View: 6985

Continue Reading →

This single author collection of essays tackles the usual subjects in horror literature—particularly Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, H. P. Lovecraft and Ramsey Campbell—but also examines some of the less well-known names of the genre, including Charles Brockden Brown and Algernon Blackwood.

The Austin-Boston Connection

Five Decades of House Democratic Leadership, 1937-1989
Author: Anthony Champagne
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1603443266
Category: Electronic books
Page: 350
View: 4350

Continue Reading →

For the more than fifty years that Democrats controlled the U.S. House of Representatives, leadership was divided between Massachusetts and Texas. "The Austin-Boston Connection "analyzes the importance of the friendships (especially mentor-protege relationships) and enmi-ties within congressional delegations, regional affinities, and the lynchpin practice of appointing the Democratic Whip.

An Outsider in Vidor


Author: Donna Montgomery
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1493149229
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 83
View: 5995

Continue Reading →

My name is Donna, and I am an outsider in Vidor. It has a lot of twisted turns in the way that people look at you since their town has a lot of secrets, and you end up in it. When I got there, there was no way of knowing what I was in for. It just seemed like a small town. The paper said people lived to a ripe old age there, never mentioning that only a select few made it. As you read this, youll find out a lot about the backwoods of Vidor you would never know, and no locals would say a word to warn you.

Songs and Gifts at the Frontier


Author: Jose S. Buenconsejo
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136719806
Category: Music
Page: 446
View: 9997

Continue Reading →

First Published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

An Outsider in Politics


Author: Kr̥shṇā Basu
Publisher: Penguin Books India
ISBN: 9780670999552
Category: Politicians
Page: 256
View: 7338

Continue Reading →

Writer, Educationist And Three-Time Lok Sabha Mp From Kolkata, Krishna Bose Gives A Compelling Account Of Her Journey From The Time She Was A Schoolgirl Witnessing Some Of The Tragic Scenes That Accompanied Partition To Her Stint As Chairperson Of The Parliamentary Standing Committee On External Affairs. Married Into The Family Of Subhas Chandra Bose, Her Acute Yet Sympathetic Observations In An Outsider In Politics Illuminate The Changing World Of The Kolkata Intelligentsia From The 1940S To The Present Day. She Writes Vividly Of Her Experiences As An Academic And A Working Mother And Gives A Ringside View Of The Drama Of Election Campaigns, The Complexities Of Parliamentary Politics And The Forces Shaping India&Rsquo;S Foreign Policy At The Turn Of The New Millennium. This Understated But Elegantly Written Memoir Combines Intimate Family And Social History With A Gripping Political Memoir.

Copenhagen Tales


Author: Helen Constantine
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191004227
Category: Fiction
Page: 320
View: 787

Continue Reading →

Exploring the many moods of the Danish capital. From the narrow twisting streets of the old town centre to the shady docklands, this rich anthology captures the essence of Copenhagen and its many faces. Through seventeen tales by some of the very best of Denmark's writers past and present, we travel the length and breadth of the Danish capital examining famous sights from unique perspectives. A guide book usefully informs a new visitor to Copenhagen but these stories allow the reader to experience the city and its history from the inside.

Outsider in Amsterdam


Author: Janwillem van de Wetering
Publisher: Soho Press
ISBN: 1569478252
Category: Fiction
Page: 304
View: 957

Continue Reading →

The first Amsterdam Cops mystery On a quiet street in downtown Amsterdam, a man is found hanging from the ceiling beam of his bedroom, upstairs from the new religious society he founded: a group that calls itself “Hindist” and supposedly mixes elements of various Eastern traditions. Detective-Adjutant Gripstra and Sergeant de Gier of the Amsterdam police are sent to investigate what looks like a simple suicide, but they are immediately suspicious of the circumstances. This now-classic novel, first published in 1975, introduces Janwillem van de Wetering’s lovable Amsterdam cop duo of portly, wise Gripstra and handsome, contemplative de Gier. With its unvarnished depiction of the legacy of Dutch colonialism and the darker facets of Amsterdam’s free drug culture, this excellent procedural asks the question of whether a murder may ever be justly committed. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Engines of Democracy

Politics and Policymaking in State Legislatures
Author: Alan Rosenthal
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 148330454X
Category: Political Science
Page: 442
View: 5592

Continue Reading →

State legislators have often been in the shadow of their national counterparts, but they drive the processes of democracy. Rosenthal brings together a lifetime of research and experience on state legislative politics into one eminently readable volume—a dynamic, inside view of the people involved, the politics that prevail, and the interest groups and lobbyists who advocate their causes. Building on earlier work with new data and recent interviews and observations, Rosenthal looks at the way representation works, Americans’ critical view of their legislatures, the role of legislative leaders, the dynamics of executive-legislative relationships, as well as norms and ethics. Both a complement and contrast to the policymaking process on Capitol Hill, Engines of Democracy proves that no one gives insight into state legislators and their work the way Alan Rosenthal can.

The House in France

A Memoir
Author: Gully Wells
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1408818221
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 320
View: 3628

Continue Reading →

In 2009, six years after her mother's death, Gully Wells returns to La Migoua, the house in Provence which belonged to her mother - the glamorous, funny, unpredictable and furiously rude American journalist, Dee Wells. Surrounded by the clutter of decades, Gully is taken back to her childhood, to her mother, her adored stepfather - the celebrated, brilliant, womanising Oxford philosopher, A. J. Ayer - and to the rich, sensual memories that the house evokes. Gully's beautiful, rebellious mother Dee fled Boston when she was seventeen to join the Canadian Army, where she became a Sergeant Major. She married, had Gully, divorced and moved to London where she would meet, and fall madly in love with, the icon of logical positivism, Ayer, who she would later persuade to marry her. There they lived in an extraordinary, liberated and intellectual world, with friends and acquaintances including Bobby Kennedy, Mary Quant, Iris Murdoch, Jonathan Miller, George Melly and Bertrand Russell. In the turbulent and vibrant milieu of sixties London, Gully develops from a cautious only child to a studious teenager. She has a childhood infatuation with the aristocratic homosexual Michael Pitt-Rivers, loses her virginity to a Provençal hairdresser and wins a scholarship to St Hilda's at Oxford, where she blossoms, studies French history under Theodore Zeldin, and falls in love with fellow student, Martin Amis. But as the affair ends, Gully moves on, explores love and travel, eventually settling down in New York. La Migoua, perched on a hill above Bandol, halfway between Toulon and Marseilles, is inextricably woven into Gully's existence. Unsentimental and gloriously witty, The House in France is a vivid and moving love letter to a beloved mother, and a celebration of family, of growing up and of the spirit of a cherished house.

A Woman's Place Is in the House

Campaigning for Congress in the Feminist Era
Author: Barbara C. Burrell
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 9780472083848
Category: Political Science
Page: 224
View: 2418

Continue Reading →

DIVStudy of women candidates for U.S. House that argues women are successful in winning elections /div

The Dreams in the Witch House

And Other Weird Stories
Author: H. P. Lovecraft
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781440650772
Category: Fiction
Page: 480
View: 2046

Continue Reading →

"The dreams were wholly beyond the pale of sanity . . . " Plagued by insane nightmare visions, Walter Gilman seeks help in Miskatonic University's infamous library of forbidden books, where, in the pages of Abdul Alhazred's dreaded Necronomicon, he finds terrible hints that seem to connect his own studies in advanced mathematics with the fantastic legends of elder magic. The Dreams in the Witch House, gathered together here with more than twenty other tales of terror, exemplifies H. P. Lovecraft's primacy among twentieth-century American horror writers. This volume is a companion to the other two Penguin Classics edition of Lovecraft's work: The Call of the Cthulhu and The Thing on the Doorstep. This original collection presents the definitive texts of the work, including a newly restored text of "The Shadow out of time" along with S. T. Joshi's invaluable introduction and notes. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Experimental Irish Theatre

After W.B. Yeats
Author: I. Walsh
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137001364
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 202
View: 2089

Continue Reading →

This book examines experimental Irish theatre that ran counter to the naturalistic 'peasant' drama synonymous with Irish playwriting. Focusing on four marginalised playwrights after Yeats, it charts a tradition linking the experimentation of the early Irish theatre movement with the innovation of contemporary Irish and international drama.

Playing House in the American West

Western Women’s Life Narratives, 1839-1987
Author: Cathryn Halverson
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817318038
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 251
View: 8908

Continue Reading →

Examining an eclectic group of western women’s autobiographical texts—canonical and otherwise—Playing House in the American West argues for a distinct regional literary tradition characterized by strategic representations of unconventional domestic life. The controlling metaphor Cathryn Halverson uses in her engrossing study is “playing house.” From Caroline Kirkland and Laura Ingalls Wilder to Willa Cather and Marilynne Robinson, from the mid-nineteenth to the late-twentieth centuries, western authors have persistently embraced wayward or eccentric housekeeping to prove a woman’s difference from western neighbors and eastern readers alike. The readings in Playing House investigate the surprising textual ends to which westerners turn the familiar terrain of the home: evaluating community; arguing for different conceptions of race and class; and perhaps most especially, resisting traditional gender roles. Western women writers, Halverson argues, render the home as a stage for autonomy, resistance, and imagination rather than as a site of sacrifice and obligation. The western women examined in Playing House in the American West are promoted and read as representatives of a region, as insiders offering views of distant and intriguing ways of life, even as they conceive of themselves as outsiders. By playing with domestic conventions, they recast the region they describe, portraying the West as a place that fosters female agency, individuality, and subjectivity.

The Truth of Power: Intellectual Affairs in the Clinton White House


Author: Benjamin R. Barber
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393070409
Category: Political Science
Page: 336
View: 8184

Continue Reading →

Ideas and the presidency flirt with each other, but can they really get along? President Clinton had a romance with big ideas. He intently cultivated intellectuals, seducing them with his characteristic charm and with the promise of real influence on the political stage. Yet most often he disappointed the big thinkers whose advice he sought. Benjamin Barber was first invited to Camp David in 1994, along with other prominent members of the academic community, to participate in a "seminar" with President Clinton on the future of Democratic ideas and ideals. Afterwards, he became a steady informal adviser to the White House. For a politically committed professor like Barber, the opportunity was exhilarating—here was an opportunity to put ideas into action, to link ideas to power. The result was enlightening, if unexpected. The most unpredictable factor was the president himself: a man of astonishing intellectual gifts, a consummate listener and synthesizer of ideas, who nonetheless failed to present a stirring progressive vision or even to craft a memorable speech. With great perceptiveness, wit, and élan, Barber provides a startling meditation on truth and power—and the truth of power, which is the responsibility of the elected not to an idea but to the electorate. He identifies the fault lines that future progressive candidates must straddle if they are to win—and the gift they must have, if they are to be great, of calling forth the best in their fellow citizens. In the end, Barber give us a unique portrait of our compelling and maddening ex-president, and the hopes and disillusionments he represents.

The Outsider


Author: Penelope Williamson
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1476740070
Category: Fiction
Page: 576
View: 7951

Continue Reading →

Penelope Williamson’s classic bestseller blends the best of historical western and Amish romance in a sweeping tale “sure to please any fan of good old-fashioned storytelling” (Library Journal). A daughter of the faith…a stranger with a gun…a forbidden love. Throughout the years on her Montana homestead, Rachel Yoder had never been afraid—the creed of the Plain People had been her strength. Then the day came when lawless men killed Rachel’s husband in an act of blind greed. Now, at her darkest hour, an outsider walks across her meadow and into her life… Johnny Cain is bloody, near death, and armed to the teeth. A man hardened by his violent past, Cain has never known a woman like Rachel—someone who offers him a chance to heal more than his physical wounds. Cain’s lazy smile and teasing ways steal Rachel's heart and confound her soul. Soon she must choose between all she holds dear—her faith, her family, perhaps her very salvation—and the man they call the Outsider.