Our America


Author: Lealan Jones,Lloyd Newman,David Isay
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0671004646
Category: Photography
Page: 208
View: 6910

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Interviews describe ghetto life

Our America

Life and Death on the South Side of Chicago
Author: Lealan Jones,Lloyd Newman,David Isay
Publisher: Paw Prints
ISBN: 9781442027367
Category:
Page: 203
View: 9257

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The award-winning creators of NPR's Ghetto Life 101 and Remorse combine their talents to focus on the Ida B. Wells housing project and their personal struggles to survive unrelenting tragedy. Reprint.

The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939


Author: Robert L. Harris, Jr.,Rosalyn Terborg-Penn
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231138116
Category: History
Page: 442
View: 5383

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Marian Anderson's famous 1939 concert in front of the Lincoln Memorial was a watershed moment in the struggle for racial justice. Beginning with this event, Robert L. Harris Jr. and Rosalyn Terborg-Penn chart the historical efforts of African Americans to address racism and inequality. They explore the rise of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements and the national and international contexts that shaped their ideologies and methods. They consider how changes in immigration patterns have complicated the conventional "black/white" dichotomy in American society and discuss the often uneasy coexistence between a growing African American middle class and a persistent and sizable underclass. Contributors consider specific issues in African American life, including the effects of the postindustrial economy and the influence of music, military service, sports, literature, culture, business, and the politics of self-designation, e.g., "Colored" vs. "Negro," "Black" vs. "African American." An invaluable resource, The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939 is a multifaceted map of a crucial historical period.

The South Side

A Portrait of Chicago and American Segregation
Author: Natalie Y. Moore
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1137280158
Category: Social Science
Page: 272
View: 1141

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Mayors Richard M. Daley and Rahm Emanuel have touted and promoted Chicago as a "world class city." The skyscrapers kissing the clouds, the billion-dollar Millennium Park, Michelin-rated restaurants, pristine lake views, fabulous shopping, vibrant theater scene, downtown flower beds and stellar architecture tell one story. Yet, swept under the rug is the stench of segregation that compromises Chicago. The Manhattan Institute dubs Chicago as one of the most segregated big cities in the country. Though other cities - including Cleveland, Los Angeles, and Baltimore - can fight over that mantle, it's clear that segregation defines Chicago. And unlike many other major U.S. cities, no one race dominates. Chicago is divided equally into black, white, and Latino, each group clustered in their various turfs. In this intelligent and highly important narrative, Chicago-native Natalie Moore shines a light on contemporary segregation on the South Side of Chicago through reported essays, showing the life of these communities through the stories of people who live in them. The South Side shows the important impact of Chicago's historic segregation - and the ongoing policies that keep it that way.

Listening Is an Act of Love

A Celebration of American Life from the StoryCorps Project
Author: Dave Isay
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101202630
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 320
View: 9611

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As heard on NPR, a wondrous nationwide celebration of our shared humanity StoryCorps founder and legendary radio producer Dave Isay selects the most memorable stories from StoryCorps' collection, creating a moving portrait of American life. The voices here connect us to real people and their lives--to their experiences of profound joy, sadness, courage, and despair, to good times and hard times, to good deeds and misdeeds. To read this book is to be reminded of how rich and varied the American storybook truly is, how resistant to easy categorization or stereotype. We are our history, individually and collectively, and Listening Is an Act of Love touchingly reminds us of this powerful truth. Dave Isay's newest book, Callings, is now available from Penguin Press.

Out of the Shadow

A Russian Jewish Girlhood on the Lower East Side
Author: Rose Cohen
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801471427
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 336
View: 2317

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In this appealing autobiography, Rose Cohen looks back on her family's journey from Tsarist Russia to New York City's Lower East Side. Her account of their struggles and of her own coming of age in a complex new world vividly illustrates what was, for some, the American experience. First published in 1918, Cohen's narrative conveys a powerful sense of the aspirations and frustrations of an immigrant Jewish family in an alien culture. With uncommon frankness, Cohen reports her youthful impressions of daily life in the tenements and of working conditions in garment sweatshops and domestic service. She introduces a large cast, including her co-workers, employers, mentors, family members, and friends. In simple yet moving terms, she recalls how, while confronting setbacks caused by poor health and dilemmas posed by courtship, she finds opportunities to educate herself. She also records the gradual weakening of her family's commitment to religion as they find their way from the shadow of poverty toward the mainstream of American life.

There Are No Children Here

The Story of Two Boys Growing Up in The Other America
Author: Alex Kotlowitz
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 0307814289
Category: Social Science
Page: 336
View: 1044

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This is the moving and powerful account of two remarkable boys struggling to survive in Chicago's Henry Horner Homes, a public housing complex disfigured by crime and neglect. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Yummy: The Last Days of a Southside Shorty


Author: Greg Neri
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781606869390
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 94
View: 8042

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A graphic novel based on the life and death of Robert "Yummy" Sandifer, an 11-year-old gang member from Chicago's Southside who was killed by his own gang members.

The Warmth of Other Suns

The Epic Story of America's Great Migration
Author: Isabel Wilkerson
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0679763880
Category: Social Science
Page: 622
View: 7865

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Presents an epic history that covers the period from the end of World War I through the 1970s, chronicling the decades-long migration of African Americans from the South to the North and West through the stories of three individuals and their families.

The Death and Life of Great American Cities


Author: Jane Jacobs
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 052543285X
Category: Social Science
Page: 480
View: 2951

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Thirty years after its publication, The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as "perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning....[It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book's arguments." Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jacobs's small masterpiece is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It is sensible, knowledgeable, readable, indispensable. The author has written a new foreword for this Modern Library edition.

Native Son


Author: Richard Wright
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: N.A
Category: African American men
Page: 359
View: 2144

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What Parish Are You From?

A Chicago Irish Community and Race Relations
Author: Eileen M. McMahon
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 9780813170541
Category: Social Science
Page: 226
View: 7753

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For Irish Americans, as for Chicago's other ethnic groups, the local parish once formed the nucleus of daily life. Focusing on the parish of St. Sabina's in southwest Chicago, Eileen McMahon takes a penetrating look at the response of Catholic ethnics to life in twentieth century America.

Steel Barrio

The Great Mexican Migration to South Chicago, 1915-1940
Author: Michael Innis-Jiménez
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814760155
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 2157

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Since the early twentieth century, thousands of Mexican Americans have lived, worked, and formed communities in Chicago’s steel mill neighborhoods. Drawing on individual stories and oral histories, Michael Innis-Jiménez tells the story of a vibrant, active community that continues to play a central role in American politics and society. Examining how the fortunes of Mexicans in South Chicago were linked to the environment they helped to build, Steel Barrio offers new insights into how and why Mexican Americans created community. This book investigates the years between the World Wars, the period that witnessed the first, massive influx of Mexicans into Chicago. South Chicago Mexicans lived in a neighborhood whose literal and figurative boundaries were defined by steel mills, which dominated economic life for Mexican immigrants. Yet while the mills provided jobs for Mexican men, they were neither the center of community life nor the source of collective identity. Steel Barrio argues that the Mexican immigrant and Mexican American men and women who came to South Chicago created physical and imagined community not only to defend against the ever-present social, political, and economic harassment and discrimination, but to grow in a foreign, polluted environment. Steel Barrio reconstructs the everyday strategies the working-class Mexican American community adopted to survive in areas from labor to sports to activism. This book links a particular community in South Chicago to broader issues in twentieth-century U.S. history, including race and labor, urban immigration, and the segregation of cities.

Wild Hundreds


Author: Nate Marshall
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press
ISBN: 0822981084
Category: Poetry
Page: 80
View: 4466

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Winner, 2017 Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writers Award (poetry category) Winner, 2016 BCALA Literary Award (poetry category) Winner of the 2014 Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize Finalist, 2015 NAACP Image Awards (poetry category) Wild Hundreds is a long love song to Chicago. The book celebrates the people, culture, and places often left out of the civic discourse and the travel guides. Wild Hundreds is a book that displays the beauty of black survival and mourns the tragedy of black death.

The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano


Author: Sonia Manzano
Publisher: Scholastic Inc.
ISBN: 0545469589
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 224
View: 6266

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One of America’s most influential Hispanics -- 'Maria' on Sesame Street -- presents a powerful novel set in New York's El Barrio in 1969 There are two secrets Evelyn Serrano is keeping from her Mami and Papo? her true feelings about growing up in her Spanish Harlem neighborhood, and her attitude about Abuela, her sassy grandmother who's come from Puerto Rico to live with them. Then, like an urgent ticking clock, events erupt that change everything. The Young Lords, a Puerto Rican activist group, dump garbage in the street and set it on fire, igniting a powerful protest. When Abuela steps in to take charge, Evelyn is thrust into the action. Tempers flare, loyalties are tested. Through it all, Evelyn learns important truths about her Latino heritage and the history makers who shaped a nation. Infused with actual news accounts from the time period, Sonia Manzano has crafted a gripping work of fiction based on her own life growing up during a fiery, unforgettable time in America, when young Latinos took control of their destinies.

See What I See


Author: Gloria Whelan
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062039717
Category: Young Adult Fiction
Page: 208
View: 9417

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Kate Tapert sees her life in paintings. She makes sense of the world around her by relating it to what she adores—art. Armed with a suitcase, some canvases, and a scholarship to art school in Detroit, Kate is ready to leave home and fully immerse herself in painting. Sounds like heaven. All Kate needs is a place to stay. That place is the home of her father, famous and reclusive artist Dalton Quinn, a father she hasn't seen or heard from in nearly ten years. When Kate knocks on his door out of the blue, little does she realize what a life-altering move that will turn out to be. But Kate has a dream, and she will work her way into Dalton's life, into his mind, into his heart . . . whether he likes it or not.

Michelle Obama

A Life
Author: Peter Slevin
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307949311
Category: African American lawyers
Page: 432
View: 9224

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Biography of the 46th First Lady of the United States (1964).

Building Cathedrals


Author: Ted Travis
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780997371710
Category:
Page: 290
View: 5830

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As a young urban youth worker, Ted Travis was captivated by a question posed by Christian community development pioneer Dr. John Perkins: "How do we build incentive in inner-city youth, motivating them toward Christ and a life of meaning and purpose?" Over the next 30 years, Ted wrestled with this question as he and his wife Shelly ministered to hundreds of teens in Denver's Five Points neighborhood- an inner-city community facing the daunting challenges of poverty, gangs, crime, and unemployment. Along the way, Ted pressed biblical principles and tried-in the-trenches strategies into a philosophy of youth leadership development he calls "transformational discipleship." In Building Cathedrals, Ted shares his blueprint for transformational discipleship (as well as accounts of its profound impact on young people) and exhorts today's youth workers to reimagine their ministries and raise up a new generation of visionary urban leaders. This book has been revised and expanded, including the addition of a index.

Mo' Meta Blues

The World According to Questlove
Author: Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson,Ben Greenman
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
ISBN: 1455501360
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 9569

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"You have to bear in mind that [Questlove] is one of the smartest motherf*****s on the planet. His musical knowledge, for all practical purposes, is limitless." --Robert Christgau MO' META BLUES The World According to Questlove Mo' Meta Blues is a punch-drunk memoir in which Everyone's Favorite Questlove tells his own story while tackling some of the lates, the greats, the fakes, the philosophers, the heavyweights, and the true originals of the music world. He digs deep into the album cuts of his life and unearths some pivotal moments in black art, hip hop, and pop culture. Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson is many things: virtuoso drummer, producer, arranger, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon bandleader, DJ, composer, and tireless Tweeter. He is one of our most ubiquitous cultural tastemakers, and in this, his first book, he reveals his own formative experiences--from growing up in 1970s West Philly as the son of a 1950s doo-wop singer, to finding his own way through the music world and ultimately co-founding and rising up with the Roots, a.k.a., the last hip hop band on Earth. Mo' Meta Blues also has some (many) random (or not) musings about the state of hip hop, the state of music criticism, the state of statements, as well as a plethora of run-ins with celebrities, idols, and fellow artists, from Stevie Wonder to KISS to D'Angelo to Jay-Z to Dave Chappelle to...you ever seen Prince roller-skate?!? But Mo' Meta Blues isn't just a memoir. It's a dialogue about the nature of memory and the idea of a post-modern black man saddled with some post-modern blues. It's a book that questions what a book like Mo' Meta Blues really is. It's the side wind of a one-of-a-kind mind. It's a rare gift that gives as well as takes. It's a record that keeps going around and around.

High-Risers

Cabrini-Green and the Fate of American Public Housing
Author: Ben Austen
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062235087
Category: Social Science
Page: 400
View: 5233

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Joining the ranks of Evicted, The Warmth of Other Sons, and classic works of literary non-fiction by Alex Kotlowitz and J. Anthony Lukas, High-Risers braids personal narratives, city politics, and national history to tell the timely and epic story of Chicago’s Cabrini-Green, America’s most iconic public housing project. Built in the 1940s atop an infamous Italian slum, Cabrini-Green grew to twenty-three towers and a population of 20,000—all of it packed onto just seventy acres a few blocks from Chicago’s ritzy Gold Coast. Cabrini-Green became synonymous with crime, squalor, and the failure of government. For the many who lived there, it was also a much-needed resource—it was home. By 2011, every high-rise had been razed, the island of black poverty engulfed by the white affluence around it, the families dispersed. In this novelistic and eye-opening narrative, Ben Austen tells the story of America’s public housing experiment and the changing fortunes of American cities. It is an account told movingly though the lives of residents who struggled to make a home for their families as powerful forces converged to accelerate the housing complex’s demise. Beautifully written, rich in detail, and full of moving portraits, High-Risers is a sweeping exploration of race, class, popular culture, and politics in modern America that brilliantly considers what went wrong in our nation’s effort to provide affordable housing to the poor—and what we can learn from those mistakes.