On the War for Greek Freedom

Selections from The Histories
Author: Herodotus
Publisher: Hackett Publishing
ISBN: 1603846794
Category: History
Page: 232
View: 5509

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Designed for students with little or no background in ancient Greek language, history, and culture, this new abridgment presents those selections that comprise Herodotus’ historical narrative. These are meticulously annotated, and supplemented with a chronology of the Archaic Age, Historical Epilogue, glossary of main characters and places, index of proper names, and maps.

On the War for Greek Freedom

Selections from The Histories
Author: Herodotus
Publisher: Hackett Publishing
ISBN: 1624662269
Category: History
Page: 232
View: 6713

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Designed for students with little or no background in ancient Greek language, history, and culture, this new abridgment presents those selections that comprise Herodotus’ historical narrative. These are meticulously annotated, and supplemented with a chronology of the Archaic Age, Historical Epilogue, glossary of main characters and places, index of proper names, and maps.

On the War for Greek Freedom

Selections from the Histories
Author: Herodotus,Samuel Shirley,James S. Romm
Publisher: Hackett Publishing
ISBN: 9780872206670
Category: History
Page: 232
View: 2282

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Designed for students with little or no background in ancient Greek language, history, and culture, this new abridgement presents those selections that comprise Herodotus' historical narrative. These are meticulously annotated, and supplemented with a chronology of the Archaic Age, Historical Epilogue, glossary of main characters and places, index of proper names, and maps.

The Greek War of Independence

The Struggle for Freedom from Ottoman Oppression
Author: David Brewer
Publisher: Overlook Press
ISBN: 9781590206911
Category: History
Page: 393
View: 9021

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A classical scholar reconstructs the Greek war for independence from the Ottoman empire, a conflict that captured the imagination of Romantic-era Europe and spurred thousands of non-Greek volunteers to join the struggle.

On Justice, Power, and Human Nature

Selections from The History of the Peloponnesian War
Author: Thucydides,Paul Woodruff
Publisher: Hackett Publishing
ISBN: 9781603845069
Category:
Page: 216
View: 9937

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Designed for students with little or no background in ancient Greek language and culture, this collection of extracts from The History of the Peloponnesian War includes those passages that shed most light on Thucydides' political theory--famous as well as important but lesser-known pieces frequently overlooked by nonspecialists. Newly translated into spare, vigorous English, and situated within a connective narrative framework, Woodruff’s selections will be of special interest to instructors in political theory and Greek civilization. Includes maps, notes, glossary.

Lords of the Sea

The Epic Story of the Athenian Navy and the Birth of Democracy
Author: John R. Hale
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780670020805
Category: History
Page: 395
View: 5296

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Presents a history of the epic battles, the indomitable ships, and the men--from extraordinary leaders to seductive rogues--who established Athens' supremacy, taking readers on a tour of the far-flung expeditions and detailing the legacy of a forgotten maritime empire.

The Greek Slogan of Freedom and Early Roman Politics in Greece


Author: Sviatoslav Dmitriev
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195375181
Category: History
Page: 524
View: 9782

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This book elucidates the many uses of the slogan of freedom by ancient Greeks, beginning with the Peloponnesian war and continuing throughout the Hellenistic period, and shows in detail how the Romans appropriated and adjusted Greek political vocabulary and practices to establish the pax Romana over the Mediterranean world.

Taken at the Flood

The Roman Conquest of Greece
Author: Robin Waterfield
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199916896
Category: History
Page: 287
View: 6380

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Chronicles Rome's policies in the Greek East, which began as self-rule so that the Empire could focus on the Carthaginian menace in the West, but later moved to more direct control several decades later.

The hour of the bell

a novel of the 1821 Greek War of Independence against the Turks
Author: Harry Mark Petrakis
Publisher: Lake View Pr
ISBN: 9780385048774
Category: Fiction
Page: 363
View: 6196

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German Freedom and the Greek Ideal

The Cultural Legacy from Goethe to Mann
Author: William J. McGrath
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 9781137369475
Category: History
Page: 276
View: 7648

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In 1794, Friedrich Schiller declared that "beauty is the only possible expression of freedom in phenomena." German Freedom and the Greek Ideal traces this German idea of freedom from the late Enlightenment through the early twentieth century. It focuses on the stars of German intellectual and artistic life in the nineteenth century, with illuminating accounts of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Gottfried Semper, Richard Wagner, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Thomas Mann. Delving deeply into their works, McGrath shows how they invoked the ancient Greeks to in order to inspire Germans to cultural renewal and to enrich their understanding of freedom as something deeper and more urgent than political life could offer.

Marathon


Author: Richard Billows
Publisher: Gerald Duckworth & Co
ISBN: 0715642456
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 6406

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The Battle of Marathon in 490B.C. is not only the most decisive event in the struggle between the Greeks and the Persians but, arguably a defining event for Western civilisation. John Stuart Mill famously proposed "the Battle of Marathon, even as an event in British history, is more important than the Battle of Hastings." Richard A. Billows starts by providing a rich and detailed overview of the Greek world at a time leading up to Marathon, including an examination of the Greek concept of 'bestness' and a look at a prosperous, democratic Athens under Kleisthenes, which could, for the first time, deploy a citizen army in full panoply, to devastating effect against the lightly outfitted Persian infantry, despite its greater numbers. Key players include the Athenian general Miltiades, who, from the point of view of military history, was the first to utilize a totally oufitted hoplite phalanx to its fullest and develop the groundbreaking battle tactics in advance of the contest that provided the fulcrum for the Greeks' victory over King Darius' Persian army. The legend of the Greek messenger Philippides running twenty-six miles from Marathon to Athens with news of the Greek victory is the inspiration for our modern day marathon race, introduced at the Athens Olympic Games of 1896. Billows suggests, however, that the sources present it differently; with two runs- the messenger running 280 miles round trip to Sparta to ask for aid, and the entire Greek army in full panoply, after fierce ad exhausting fighting, marching at a rapid speed back to Athens in the event they were needed to defend its port.

Lysistrata


Author: Aristophanes
Publisher: The Floating Press
ISBN: 1775458105
Category: Drama
Page: 109
View: 587

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One of the few plays that survived intact from the heyday of ancient Grecian drama, Lysistrata is an enormously influential work of satirical comedy. In order to bring an end to a destructive and never-ending war, the women of Greece take a temporary vow of chastity, pledging to remain abstinent until the conflict ends. As can be expected, mayhem -- and hilarity -- ensues.

Women in the Athenian Agora


Author: Susan I. Rotroff,Robert Lamberton
Publisher: ASCSA
ISBN: 9780876616444
Category: History
Page: 56
View: 372

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Using evidence from the Athenian Agora the authors show how objects discovered during excavations provide a vivid picture of women's lives. The book is structured according to the social roles women played - as owners of property, companions (in and outside of marriage), participants in ritual, craftspeople, producers, and consumers. A final section moves from the ancient world to the modern, discussing the role of women as archaeologists in the early years of the Agora excavations.

A History of Greece, 1300 to 30 BC


Author: Victor Parker
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118559339
Category: History
Page: 440
View: 3351

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A History of Greece: 1300‒30 BC, offers a comprehensive introduction to the foundational political history of Greece, from the late Mycenaean Age through to the death of Cleopatra VII, the last Hellenistic monarch of Egypt. Introduces textual and archaeological evidence used by historians to reconstruct historical events during Greece’s Bronze, Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods Reveals the political and social structure of the Greek world in the late Mycenaean period (thirteenth century BC) through analysis of the Linear B tablets, the oldest surviving records in Greek Features numerous references to original source materials, including various fragmentary papyri, inscriptions, coins, and other literary sources Provides extensive coverage of the Hellenistic period, and covers areas excluded from most Greek history texts, including the Greek West Features judicious use of illustrations throughout, and considers instructors’ teaching needs by structuring the later sections to facilitate teaching a parallel course in Roman History Balances scholarship with a reader-friendly approach to create an accessible introduction to the political history of one of most remarkable ancient civilizations and sophisticated periods of world history

Children of the Dictatorship

Student Resistance, Cultural Politics and the 'Long 1960s' in Greece
Author: Kostis Kornetis
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782380019
Category: History
Page: 392
View: 8811

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Putting Greece back on the cultural and political map of the "Long 1960s," this book traces the dissent and activism of anti-regime students during the dictatorship of the Colonels (1967-74). It explores the cultural as well as ideological protest of Greek student activists, illustrating how these "children of the dictatorship" managed to re-appropriate indigenous folk tradition for their "progressive" purposes and how their transnational exchange molded a particular local protest culture. It examines how the students' social and political practices became a major source of pressure on the Colonels' regime, finding its apogee in the three day Polytechnic uprising of November 1973 which laid the foundations for a total reshaping of Greek political culture in the following decades.

Herodotus and the Persian Wars


Author: John Claughton
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: N.A
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 160
View: 479

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An exciting series that provides students with direct access to the ancient world by offering new translations of extracts from its key texts. Herodotus, writing in the second half of the 5th century BC, is the first historian of western civilisation. His narrative tells of the expansion of the Persian Empire in the 6th and 5th centuries BC and the wars between Greece and Persia in 490 and 480 BC. Some of the most famous battles of history, Marathon, Thermopylae and Salamis, are dramatically described in his work. His purpose is to explain why the wars happened and his sophisticated and complex answer encompasses the relation of gods to men, the nature of different peoples and the character of individuals.

The Geography of Thought


Author: Richard Nisbett
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 1857884191
Category: Psychology
Page: 288
View: 4420

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When Richard Nisbett showed an animated underwater scene to his American students, they zeroed in on a big fish swimming among smaller fish. Japanese subjects, on the other hand, made observations about the background environment...and the different "seeings" are a clue to profound underlying cognitive differences between Westerners and East Asians. As Professor Nisbett shows in The Geography of Thought people actually think - and even see - the world differently, because of differing ecologies, social structures, philosophies, and educational systems that date back to ancient Greece and China, and that have survived into the modern world. As a result, East Asian thought is "holistic" - drawn to the perceptual field as a whole, and to relations among objects and events within that field. By comparison to Western modes of reasoning, East Asian thought relies far less on categories, or on formal logic; it is fundamentally dialectic, seeking a "middle way" between opposing thoughts. By contrast, Westerners focus on salient objects or people, use attributes to assign them to categories, and apply rules of formal logic to understand their behaviour.

Greece, the Decade of War

Occupation, Resistance and Civil War
Author: David Brewer
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857729365
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 7309

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During the 1940s Greece was torn apart twice, first by World War II and second by Civil War.Beginning in 1941, the occupation of Greece by Germany was intensely brutal. Children starved on the streets of Athens. The Jewish population was decimated in the Holocaust. Heroic acts of resistance - performed in concert with the SOE - were met with vicious reprisals. When Greece was finally freed from Nazi rule in 1944, the fractured and embittered nation became engulfed in civil war, as conflict flared between the British and American-sponsored government and communist-led rebels. Acclaimed historian of Greece David Brewer here investigates this tumultuous decade in Greece's modern history, providing a compelling military and political history.

Xerxes Invades Greece


Author: Herodotus
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141963816
Category: History
Page: 128
View: 4587

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A king who would be worshipped as a god... When Xerxes, King of Persia, crosses the Hellespont at the head of a formidable army, it seems inevitable that Greece will be crushed beneath its might. But the Greeks are far harder to defeat than he could ever have imagined. As storms lash the Persian ships, and sinister omens predict a cruel fate for the expedition, Xerxes strives onward, certain his enemies will accept him as their king. But as he soon discovers, the Greeks will sacrifice anything, even their lives, to keep their liberty...

That Greece Might Still be Free

The Philhellenes in the War of Independence
Author: William St. Clair
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
ISBN: 1906924007
Category: History
Page: 484
View: 2547

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When in 1821, the Greeks rose in violent revolution against the rule of the Ottoman Turks, waves of sympathy spread across Western Europe and the United States. More than a thousand volunteers set out to fight for the cause. The Philhellenes, whether they set out to recreate the Athens of Pericles, start a new crusade, or make money out of a war, all felt that Greece had unique claim on the sympathy of the world. As Byron wrote, 'I dreamed that Greece might Still be Free'; and he died at Missolonghi trying to translate that dream into reality. William St Clair's meticulously researched and highly readable account of their aspirations and experiences was hailed as definitive when it was first published. Long out of print, it remains the standard account of the Philhellenic movement and essential reading for any students of the Greek War of Independence, Byron, and European Romanticism. Its relevance to more modern ethnic and religious conflicts is becoming increasingly appreciated by scholars worldwide. This new and revised edition includes a new Introduction by Roderick Beaton, an updated Bibliography and many new illustrations.