Ohio Archaeology

An Illustrated Chronicle of Ohio's Ancient American Indian Cultures
Author: Bradley Thomas Lepper
Publisher: Orange Frazer PressInc
ISBN: 9781882203390
Category: History
Page: 300
View: 1203

Continue Reading →

Ohio Archaeology is a valuable resource for readers, teachers and students who want to learn more about the lifeways and legacies of the first Ohioans.

Ohio

A History of the Buckeye State
Author: Kevin F. Kern,Gregory S. Wilson
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118548329
Category: History
Page: 544
View: 7081

Continue Reading →

Ohio: A History of the Buckeye State explores the breadthof Ohio’s past, tracing the course of history from itsearliest geological periods to the present day in an accessible,single-volume format. Features the most up-to-date research on Ohio, drawing onmaterial in the disciplines of history, archaeology, and politicalscience Includes thematic chapters focusing on major social, economic,and political trends Amply illustrated with maps, drawings, and photographs Receipient of the Ohio Geneological Society's Henry HoweAward in 2014

Archaeology in America: An Encyclopedia [4 volumes]

An Encyclopedia
Author: Linda S. Cordell,Kent Lightfoot,Francis McManamon,George Milner
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313021899
Category: Social Science
Page: 1488
View: 8439

Continue Reading →

The greatness of America is right under our feet. The American past—the people, battles, industry and homes—can be found not only in libraries and museums, but also in hundreds of archaeological sites that scientists investigate with great care. These sites are not in distant lands, accessible only by research scientists, but nearby—almost every locale possesses a parcel of land worthy of archaeological exploration. Archaeology in America is the first resource that provides students, researchers, and anyone interested in their local history with a survey of the most important archaeological discoveries in North America. Leading scholars, most with an intimate knowledge of the area, have written in-depth essays on over 300 of the most important archaeological sites that explain the importance of the site, the history of the people who left the artifacts, and the nature of the ongoing research. Archaeology in America divides it coverage into 8 regions: the Arctic and Subarctic, the Great Basin and Plateau, the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains, the Midwest, the Northeast, the Southeast, the Southwest, and the West Coast. Each entry provides readers with an accessible overview of the archaeological site as well as books and articles for further research.

Ancient America

Fifty Archaeological Sites to See for Yourself
Author: Kenneth L. Feder
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 144226313X
Category: Travel
Page: 256
View: 5734

Continue Reading →

Presenting “the real deal” of American antiquity—as opposed to the hyped fare of many cable TV shows—Kenneth Feder invites readers to explore the stunning technological, architectural, engineering, and artistic achievements of America’s first peoples. Part travel guide, part friendly reference, Ancient America showcases fifty iconic and publicly-accessible sites located across the contiguous United States—including monumental pyramids of earth, “castles” ensconced in cliff niches, and vast rock art galleries. Among the places profiled are four World Heritage Sites (Chaco Canyon, NM; Mesa Verde, CO; Cahokia, IL; Poverty Point, LA); numerous Historic Landmarks and National Monuments (including Crystal River, FL; Town Creek Mound, NC; Casa Grande, AZ; and Hovenweep, UT); and stunningly diverse sites ranging from Serpent Mound (OH) and Horsethief Lake (WA) to Canyon de Chelly (AZ) and Nine Mile Canyon (UT). In addition to practical visitor information, Feder tells the fascinating stories of each site as revealed by archaeological research. Introductory chapters delve into the deep past of Native America; historical and cultural details as well as original photography round out the site entries. Readers will be inspired to visit these remarkable places where the past continues to resonate in the present.

Early Native Americans in West Virginia: The Fort Ancient Culture


Author: Darla Spencer
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1467118516
Category: History
Page: 158
View: 945

Continue Reading →

Once thought of as Indian hunting grounds with no permanent inhabitants, West Virginia is teeming with evidence of a thriving early native population. Today's farmers can hardly plow their fields without uncovering ancient artifacts, evidence of at least ten thousand years of occupation. Members of the Fort Ancient culture resided along the rich bottomlands of southern West Virginia during the Late Prehistoric and Protohistoric periods. Lost to time and rediscovered in the 1880s, Fort Ancient sites dot the West Virginia landscape. This volume explores sixteen of these sites, including Buffalo, Logan and Orchard. Archaeologist Darla Spencer excavates the fascinating lives of some of the Mountain State's earliest inhabitants in search of who these people were, what languages they spoke and who their descendants may be.

Hopewell Ceremonial Landscapes of Ohio

More Than Mounds and Geometric Earthworks
Author: Mark Lynott
Publisher: Oxbow Books
ISBN: 1782977570
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 3031

Continue Reading →

Nearly 2000 years ago, people living in the river valleys of southern Ohio built earthen monuments on a scale that is unmatched in the archaeological record for small-scale societies. The period from c. 200 BC to c. AD 500 (Early to Middle Woodland) witnessed the construction of mounds, earthen walls, ditches, borrow pits and other earthen and stone features covering dozen of hectares at many sites and hundreds of hectares at some. The development of the vast Hopewell Culture geometric earthwork complexes such as those at Mound City, Chilicothe; Hopewell; and the Newark earthworks was accompanied by the establishment of wide-ranging cultural contacts reflected in the movement of exotic and strikingly beautiful artefacts such as elaborate tobacco pipes, obsidian and chert arrowheads, copper axes and regalia, animal figurines and delicately carved sheets of mica. These phenomena, coupled with complex burial rituals, indicate the emergence of a political economy based on a powerful ideology of individual power and prestige, and the creation of a vast cultural landscape within which the monument complexes were central to a ritual cycle encompassing a substantial geographical area. The labour needed to build these vast cultural landscapes exceeds population estimates for the region, and suggests that people from near (and possibly far) travelled to the Scioto and other river valleys to help with construction of these monumental earthen complexes. Here, Mark Lynott draws on more than a decade of research and extensive new datasets to re-examine the spectacular and massive scale Ohio Hopewell landscapes and to explore the society that created them.

Ohio Valley History

The Journal of the Cincinnati Historical Society
Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Cincinnati (Ohio)
Page: N.A
View: 4731

Continue Reading →

Handbook of North American Indians

Environment, origins, and population
Author: Douglas H. Ubelaker,William C. Sturtevant
Publisher: US Government Printing Office
ISBN: 9780160775116
Category: History
Page: 1156
View: 4372

Continue Reading →

Encyclopedic summary of prehistory, history, cultures and political and social aspects of native peoples in Siberia, Alaska, the Canadian Arctic and Greenland.

Books in Print


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: American literature
Page: N.A
View: 1002

Continue Reading →

Books in print is the major source of information on books currently published and in print in the United States. The database provides the record of forthcoming books, books in-print, and books out-of-print.