Old Calabria


Author: Norman Douglas
Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.
ISBN: 1602063761
Category: History
Page: 340
View: 7215

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At the time when southern Italy was an isolated and underdeveloped region, Douglas wrote this 1915 travel guide to bring the beauty that he found in Calabria to the reading public. Inspired by the landscape, unique cultural traditions, and proximity to history, he found even traveling on long mule trails to be an enjoyable part of the journey rather than an inconvenience. Written in a chatty, conversational tone, Old Calabria will be of interest to armchair travelers and to anyone who enjoys stories of everyday adventure. British writer NORMAN DOUGLAS (1868-1952) wrote a number of books, including South Wind (1917).

Some Limericks

Collected for the Use of Students, & Ensplendour'd with Introduction, Geographical Index, and with Notes Explanatory and Critical
Author: Norman Douglas
Publisher: Library of Alexandria
ISBN: 1465533036
Category: Bawdy poetry
Page: 96
View: 8476

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Typescript transcription of the 2nd American edition dated 1928, actually published in 1931.

Together


Author: Norman Douglas
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Tyrol (Austria)
Page: 255
View: 8643

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Norman Douglas

a portrait
Author: Wilhelm Meusburger,Michael Allan,Helmut Swozilek
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 178
View: 8566

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South Wind


Author: Norman Douglas
Publisher: Head of Zeus Ltd
ISBN: 1786690098
Category: Fiction
Page: 320
View: 7115

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The bishop was feeling rather sea-sick. Confoundedly sea-sick, in fact. An Anglican bishop, on recuperative leave from his African diocese, alights at the island of Nepthene for a short stay on his passage to England. Soon he is caught up in the wild and exuberant antics of visitors and residents. Norman Douglas's famed, and infamous, novel of Capri is a hedonistic journey and an unforgettable classic.

The House of Percy

Honor, Melancholy, and Imagination in a Southern Family
Author: Bertram Wyatt-Brown
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198022305
Category: History
Page: 504
View: 1097

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The novels of Walker Percy--The Moviegoer, Lancelot, The Second Coming, and The Thanatos Syndrome to name a few--have left a permanent mark on twentieth-century Southern fiction; yet the history of the Percy family in America matches anything, perhaps, that he could have created. Two centuries of wealth, literary accomplishment, political leadership, depression, and sometimes suicide established a fascinating legacy that lies behind Walker Percy's acclaimed prose and profound insight into the human condition. In The House of Percy, Bertram Wyatt-Brown masterfully interprets the life of this gifted family, drawing out the twin themes of an inherited inclination to despondency and an abiding sense of honor. The Percy family roots in Mississippi and Louisiana go back to "Don Carlos" Percy, an eighteenth-century soldier of fortune who amassed a large estate but fell victim to mental disorder and suicide. Wyatt-Brown traces the Percys through the slaveholding heyday of antebellum Natchez, the ravages of the Civil War (which produced the heroic Colonel William Alexander Percy, the "Gray Eagle"), and a return to prominence in the Mississippi Delta after Reconstruction. In addition, the author recovers the tragic lives and literary achievements of several Percy-related women, including Sarah Dorsey, a popular post-Civil War novelist who horrified her relatives by befriending Jefferson Davis--a married man--and bequeathing to him her plantation home, Beauvoir, along with her entire fortune. Wyatt-Brown then chronicles the life of Senator LeRoy Percy, whose climactic re-election loss in 1911 to a racist demagogue deply stung the family pride, but inspired his bold defiance to the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s. The author goes on to tell the poignant story of poet and war hero Will Percy, the Senator's son. The weight of this family narrative found expression in Will Percy's memoirs, Lanterns on the Levee--and in the works of Walker Percy, who was reared in his cousin Will's Greenville home after the suicidal death of Walker's father and his mother's drowning. As the biography of a powerful dynasty, steeped in Sou8thern traditions and claims to kinship with English nobility, The House of Percy shows the interrelationship of legend, depression, and grand achievement. Written by a leading scholar of the South, it weaves together intensive research and thoughtful insights into a riveting, unforgettable story.

Norman Douglas

a biography
Author: Mark Holloway
Publisher: Harvill Secker
ISBN: N.A
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 519
View: 9539

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Siren Land


Author: Norman Douglas
Publisher: Guida Editori
ISBN: 9788860420862
Category: Travel
Page: 242
View: 5646

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Fountains in the Sand


Author: Norman Douglas
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781722295752
Category:
Page: 294
View: 2364

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Fountains in the Sand: Rambles Among the Oases of Tunisia by Norman Douglas * George Norman Douglas was a British writer, now best known for his 1917 novel South Wind. His travel books such as his 1915 Old Calabria were also appreciated for the quality of their writing. We are delighted to publish this classic book as part of our extensive Classic Library collection. Many of the books in our collection have been out of print for decades, and therefore have not been accessible to the general public. The aim of our publishing program is to facilitate rapid access to this vast reservoir of literature, and our view is that this is a significant literary work, which deserves to be brought back into print after many decades. The contents of the vast majority of titles in the Classic Library have been scanned from the original works. To ensure a high quality product, each title has been meticulously hand curated by our staff. Our philosophy has been guided by a desire to provide the reader with a book that is as close as possible to ownership of the original work. We hope that you will enjoy this wonderful classic work, and that for you it becomes an enriching experience.

Norman Douglas


Author: Henry Major Tomlinson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 77
View: 6290

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Norman Douglas


Author: Ralph D. Lindeman
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 208
View: 1774

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Popular Fiction in England, 1914-1918


Author: Harold Orel
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 9780813117898
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 249
View: 9445

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While Englishmen were dying by the thousands on the battlefields of Europe, their friends and relations on the home front were reading books of humor, tales of espionage and adventure, colorful romances, and historical swashbucklers. Harold Orel's penetrating book explains why escapist fiction dominated the popular literary market in England throughout the Great War. A large factor, he shows, was the view of publishers, reviewers, booksellers, libraries, literary groups, and the general reading public that escapist fiction was a useful diversion from the inescapable horrors of war. Orel begins with a survey of the British literary world and its attitudes toward the novel at the outbreak of the war. Within a broad social, cultural, and economic context he depicts the "fiction industry" at a time of extraordinary upheaval, before the triumph of Modernism, when the attitudes and esthetics of writers, the tastes of readers, and the economics of the marketplace were undergoing rapid transformation. Subsequent chapters offer detailed studies of fifteen of the most touted novels of the period and the ways they reflected--or, more often, failed to reflect--the radical changes taking place as they were being written. The writers examined include George Moore, Norman Douglas, Frank Swinnerton, Compton Mackenzie, Mary Webb, Joseph Conrad, Wyndham Lewis, John Buchan, Alec Waugh, H.G. Wells, and Arnold Bennett. Many of their novels during these years avoid mention of the war that was reshaping their world, or allude to it only obliquely. The book concludes with a review of changes in the publishing world in 1918, the last year of the Great War. In its comprehensive coverage of a wide range of oncepopular but now neglected novels, Orel's authoritative study fills a gap in the cultural and literary history of early twentieth-century England.