Nine Mile Canyon

The Archaeological History of an American Treasure
Author: Jerry D. Spangler
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781607812265
Category: Art
Page: 194
View: 507

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With an estimated 10,000 ancient rock art sites, Nine Mile Canyon has long captivated people the world over. The author takes the reader on a journey into Nine Mile Canyon through the eyes of the generations of archaeologists who have gone there only to leave bewildered by what it all means.

Last Chance Byway

The History of Nine Mile Canyon
Author: Jerry D. Spangler,Donna Kemp Spangler
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781607814429
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 6722

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"Nine Mile Canyon's role in the Old West--a story of fur trappers and miners, ranchers and homesteaders, cattle barons and barkeeps, outlaws and bounty hunters Nine Mile Canyon is famous the world over for its prehistoric art images and remnants of ancient Fremont farmers. But it also teems with Old West history that is salted with iconic figures of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Last Chance Byway lays out this newly told story of human endeavor and folly in a place historians have long ignored. The history of Nine Mile Canyon is not so much a story of those who lived and died there as it is of those whose came with dreams and left broke and disillusioned, although there were exceptions. Sam Gilson, the irascible U.S. marshal and famed polygamist hunter, became wealthy speculating in a hydrocarbon substance bearing his name, Gilsonite, a form of asphalt. The famed African American Buffalo Soldiers constructed a freight road through the canyon that for a time turned the Nine Mile Road into one of the busiest highways in Utah. Others who left their mark include famed outlaw hunter Joe Bush, infamous bounty hunter Jack Watson, the larger-than-life cattle baron Preston Nutter, and Robert Leroy Parker (known to most as Butch Cassidy)"--Provided by publisher.

Traces of Fremont

Society and Rock Art in Ancient Utah
Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Art
Page: 132
View: 8767

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Fremont is a culture (ca. 300-1300 A.D.) first defined by archaeologist Noel Morss in 1928 based on characteristics unique to the area. Intially thought to be a simple socio-political system, recent reassessments of the Fremont assume a more complex society. This volume places Fremont rock art studies in this contemporary context. Author Steven Simms offers an innovative model of Fremont society, politics, and world-view using the principles of analogy and current archaeological evidence. Simms takes readers on a trip back in time by describing what a typical Fremont "hamlet" or residential area might have looked like a thousand years ago, including the inhabitants' daily activities. Francois Gohier's captivating photographs of Fremont art and artifacts offer an engaging complement to Simms's text, aiding us in our understanding of the lives of these ancient people. Simms's book is excellent! I really like his take on Fremont, I like the narrative descriptions of various Fremont settlements, and I like his treatment of rock art--balanced and scholarly without losing the interest and excitement of that astonishing Fremont medium. --Stephen H. Lekson, professor of anthropology and curator, University of Colorado Museum of Natural History

Guide to Rock Art of the Utah Region

Sites with Public Access
Author: Dennis Slifer
Publisher: University of New Mexico Press
ISBN: 9781580960090
Category: Nature
Page: 245
View: 3290

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"Dennis Slifer has done extensive field work to identify those sites suitable for public visitation. Complete with maps and directions, this book describes more than fifty sites with public access in Utah, the Arizona strip, southern Nevada, and the western edge of Colorado. Richly illustrated with photographs and drawings, Guide to Rock Art of the Utah Region is a must for all rock art enthusiasts."--Jacket.

Sacred Images

A Vision of Native American Rock Art
Author: Leslie G. Kelen,David Sucec
Publisher: Gibbs Smith Publishers
ISBN: N.A
Category: Art
Page: 112
View: 7101

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For lovers of French decorating, this book reproduces some of the earliest toile designs from 18th-century France. Delicate flower prints, fun animal motifs, rich historic scenes, and complex architectural patterns are just some of the subjects reproduced here in rich color. The patterns in Toiles de Jouy are reproduced from an antiquarian book containing 50 plates of French toile fabric and wallpaper patterns. The range of colors is astounding and illustrates that toiles aren't always simply one color on a neutral ground. Some of the most fascinating were designed originally in multiple colors. A new introduction and stories about the toile patterns give decorators, home designers and Francophiles information about toiles that they've never seen before.

Petroglyphs and Pictographs of Utah

The East and Northeast. Volume one
Author: Kenneth Bitner Castleton
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780874808292
Category: Social Science
Page: 232
View: 1502

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Profusely illustrated with photographs and drawings of hundreds of petroglyphs and pictographs across Utah, this volume covers the Capital Reef/Canyonlands area to the Uinta Mountains, and emphasizes art...

Indian Rock Art of the Southwest


Author: Polly Schaafsma
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826309136
Category: Art
Page: 379
View: 865

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This comprehensive view of carvings and paintings on stone by Native Americans from 200 B.C. through the nineteenth century surveys the rock art of Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, northern Mexico, and west Texas, providing an incomparable visual record of Southwest Indian culture, religion, and society. Rock carvings and paintings are important sources in the archaeological and historical interpretation of Southwest Indians. Rock art reflects the cosmic and mythic orientation of the culture that produced it, and understanding of prehistoric peoples, both hunters and gatherers and the Hohokam, Anasazi, Mogollon, and Fremont cultures, and the Pueblo, Navajo, and Apache Indians. Culturally significant events such as the shift in prehistoric times from spear and atlatl to the bow, or, in the historic period, the introduction of the horse into the Southwest, are recorded in rock art. The illustrations--thirty-two color plates, nearly 250 photographs, and numerous line drawings--bring together in one volume petroglyphs and rock paintings that are scattered over thousands of miles of desert and mesa, giving the reader an overview of Indian rock art that would be nearly impossible to achieve in the field. Indian Rock Art of the Southwestexamines from an archaeological perspective the rich legacy of stone drawings and carvings preserved throughout the Southwest. Professional and amateur archaeologists and historians, as well as the general reader with an interest in Indian art, will find this volume a valuable resource.

Talking Stone

Rock Art of the Cosos
Author: Paul Goldsmith
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781607815525
Category: HISTORY
Page: 104
View: 4933

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"This book acts as a visual vehicle to see the rock art of the Coso Range. The Coso Range sits on the edge of the Mojave Desert, just east of the Sierra Nevada. It is located within the 1.2 million acres Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) China Lake and contains distinctive and spectacular displays of rock art. This rock art fills the lava gorges of Renegade Canyon, Big Petroglyph Canyon, and Sheep Canyon with images of bighorn sheep, anthropomorphs, abstract geometric figures and shield-like figures. These are pecked into the dark basalt and most appear to be between 1000 to 3000 years old, although some may be older and date to the earliest occupation of the region roughly 13,000 years ago. Both the text and photography are by Paul Goldsmith, an acclaimed cinematographer. This project is highly visual in nature and provides a photographic tour of the canyons and rock art for those that will never have a chance to visit them"--Provided by publisher.

Ancient Ruins and Rock Art of the Southwest

An Archaeological Guide
Author: David Grant Noble
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1589799380
Category: Social Science
Page: 304
View: 5485

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This fourth edition of David Grant Noble's indispensable guide to archaeological ruins of the American Southwest includes updated text and many newly opened archaeological sites. From Alibates Flint Quarries in Texas to the Zuni-Acoma Trail in New Mexico, readers are provided with such favorites as Chaco Canyon and new treasures such as Sears Kay Ruin. In addition to descriptions of each site, Noble provides time-saving tips for the traveler, citing major highways, nearby towns and the facilities they offer, campgrounds, and other helpful information. Filled with photos of ruins, petroglyphs, and artifacts, as well as maps, this is a guide every traveler needs when exploring the Southwest.

Ancient America

Fifty Archaeological Sites to See for Yourself
Author: Kenneth L. Feder
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 144226313X
Category: Travel
Page: 256
View: 7935

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Presenting “the real deal” of American antiquity—as opposed to the hyped fare of many cable TV shows—Kenneth Feder invites readers to explore the stunning technological, architectural, engineering, and artistic achievements of America’s first peoples. Part travel guide, part friendly reference, Ancient America showcases fifty iconic and publicly-accessible sites located across the contiguous United States—including monumental pyramids of earth, “castles” ensconced in cliff niches, and vast rock art galleries. Among the places profiled are four World Heritage Sites (Chaco Canyon, NM; Mesa Verde, CO; Cahokia, IL; Poverty Point, LA); numerous Historic Landmarks and National Monuments (including Crystal River, FL; Town Creek Mound, NC; Casa Grande, AZ; and Hovenweep, UT); and stunningly diverse sites ranging from Serpent Mound (OH) and Horsethief Lake (WA) to Canyon de Chelly (AZ) and Nine Mile Canyon (UT). In addition to practical visitor information, Feder tells the fascinating stories of each site as revealed by archaeological research. Introductory chapters delve into the deep past of Native America; historical and cultural details as well as original photography round out the site entries. Readers will be inspired to visit these remarkable places where the past continues to resonate in the present.

The River Knows Everything

Desolation Canyon and the Green
Author: James M Aton
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 0874217369
Category: History
Page: 246
View: 5861

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Desolation Canyon is one of the West's wild treasures. Visitors come to study, explore, run the river, and hike a canyon that is deeper at its deepest than the Grand Canyon, better preserved than most of the Colorado River system, and full of eye-catching geology-castellated ridges, dramatic walls, slickrock formations, and lovely beaches. Rafting the river, one may see wild horses, blue herons, bighorn sheep, and possibly a black bear. Signs of previous people include the newsworthy, well-preserved Fremont Indian ruins along Range Creek and rock art panels of Nine Mile Canyon, both Desolation Canyon tributaries. Historic Utes also pecked rock art, including images of graceful horses and lively locomotives, in the upper canyon. Remote and difficult to access, Desolation has a surprisingly lively history. Cattle and sheep herding, moonshine, prospecting, and hideaways brought a surprising number of settlers--ranchers, outlaws, and recluses--to the canyon.

A History of the Ancient Southwest


Author: Stephen H. Lekson
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 439
View: 3769

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According to archaeologist Stephen H. Lekson, much of what we think we know about the Southwest has been compressed into conventions and classifications and orthodoxies. This book challenges and reconfigures these accepted notions by telling two parallel stories, one about the development, personalities, and institutions of Southwestern archaeology and the other about interpretations of what actually happened in the ancient past. While many works would have us believe that nothing much ever happened in the ancient Southwest, this book argues that the region experienced rises and falls, kings and commoners, war and peace, triumphs and failures. In this view, Chaco Canyon was a geopolitical reaction to the "Colonial Period" Hohokam expansion and the Hohokam "Classic Period" was the product of refugee Chacoan nobles, chased off the Colorado Plateau by angry farmers. Far to the south, Casas Grandes was a failed attempt to create a Mesoamerican state, and modern Pueblo people--with societies so different from those at Chaco and Casas Grandes--deliberately rejected these monumental, hierarchical episodes of their past. From the publisher: The second printing of A History of the Ancient Southwest has corrected the errors noted below. SAR Press regrets an error on Page 72, paragraph 4 (also Page 275, note 2) regarding "absolute dates." "50,000 dates" was incorrectly published as "half a million dates." Also P. 125, lines 13-14: "Between 21,000 and 27,000 people lived there" should read "Between 2,100 and 2,700 people lived there."

People of the Middle Fraser Canyon

An Archaeological History
Author: Anna Marie Prentiss,Ian Kuijt
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 077482171X
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 506

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The Middle Fraser Canyon contains some of the most important archaeological sites in British Columbia, including the remains of ancient villages that supported hundreds, if not thousands, of people. How and why did these villages come into being? Why were they abandoned? In search of answers to these questions, Prentiss and Kuijt take readers on a voyage of discovery into the ancient history of the St'�t'imc, or Upper Lillooet, a people whose struggles and successes are brought to vivid life through photographs, artistic and fictionalized reconstructions of life in the villages, and discussions of evidence from archaeological surveys and excavations.

The Colorado River through Glen Canyon before Lake Powell

historic photo journal, 1872 to 1964
Author: Eleanor Inskip,Glen Canyon Natural History Association
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 95
View: 5043

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River trips through Glen Canyon from 1872-1964 were combined beginning at North Wash & ending at Lees Ferry, to present Glen Canyon before the lake. Landscape photographs & quotations from the explorers complete the journal. Fifty photographers & authors are represented. Photographs are identified by photographer, photo date & location. Quotations are identified by author & source. A map of Lake Powell is provided as a guide for today's visitor. The reader can take this book on the lake & go to the buoy indicated to compare Lake Powell today with the Glen Canyon of yesterday. Glen Canyon Natural History Association is co-publishing this book in support of the educational objectives of the National Park Service at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. A Special Limited (1,500 copies) First Edition is available. Silk-bound Limited Edition, $150, Paper-bound Edition, $25. Trade discounts available. Order from Inskip Ink, 366 East 100 North, Moab, UT 84532. Tel. & FAX 801-259-8452 or your local distributor.

In Search of the Old Ones


Author: David Roberts
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781439127230
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 6888

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An exuberant, hands-on fly-on-the-wall account that combines the thrill of canyoneering and rock climbing with the intellectual sleuthing of archaeology to explore the Anasazi. David Roberts describes the culture of the Anasazi—the name means “enemy ancestors” in Navajo—who once inhabited the Colorado Plateau and whose modern descendants are the Hopi Indians of Arizona. Archaeologists, Roberts writes, have been puzzling over the Anasazi for more than a century, trying to determine the environmental and cultural stresses that caused their society to collapse 700 years ago. He guides us through controversies in the historical record, among them the haunting question of whether the Anasazi committed acts of cannibalism. Roberts’s book is full of up-to-date thinking on the culture of the ancient people who lived in the harsh desert country of the Southwest.

Comb Ridge and its people

the ethnohistory of a rock
Author: Robert S. McPherson
Publisher: Utah State University Press
ISBN: 9780874217377
Category: History
Page: 252
View: 7984

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West of the Four Corners and east of the Colorado River, in southeastern Utah, a unique one-hundred-mile-long, two-hundred-foot-high, serrated cliff cuts the sky. Whether viewed as barrier wall or sheltering sanctuary, Comb Ridge has helped define life and culture in this region for thousands of years. Today, the area it crosses is still relatively remote, though an important part of a scenic complex of popular tourist destinations that includes Natural Bridges National Monument and Grand Gulch just to the west, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Lake Powell a bit farther west, Canyonlands National Park to the north, Hovenweep National Monument to the east, and the San Juan River and Monument Valley to the south. Prehistorically Comb Ridge split an intensively used Ancient Puebloan homeland. It later had similar cultural—both spiritual and practical—significance to Utes, Paiutes, and Navajos and played a crucial role in the history of European American settlement. To tell the story of this rock that is unlike any other rock in the world and the diverse people whose lives it has affected, Robert S. McPherson, author of multiple books on Navajos and on the Four Corners region, draws on the findings of a major, federally funded project to research the cultural history of Comb Ridge. He carries the story forward to contention over present and future uses of Comb Ridge and the spectacular country surrounding it.

Miles and Miles of Texas

100 Years of the Texas Highway Department
Author: Carol Dawson,Roger Allen Polson
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1623494575
Category: History
Page: 420
View: 2378

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On the eve of its centennial, Carol Dawson and Roger Allen Polson present almost 100 years of history and never-before-seen photographs that track the development of the Texas Highway Department. An agency originally created “to get the farmer out of the mud,” it has gone on to build the vast network of roads that now connects every corner of the state. When the Texas Highway Department (now called the Texas Department of Transportation or TxDOT) was created in 1917, there were only about 200,000 cars in Texas traveling on fewer than a thousand miles of paved roads. Today, after 100 years of the Texas Highway Department, the state boasts over 80,000 miles of paved, state-maintained roads that accommodate more than 25 million vehicles. Sure to interest history enthusiasts and casual readers alike, decades of progress and turmoil, development and disaster, and politics and corruption come together once more in these pages, which tell the remarkable story of an infrastructure 100 years in the making.

In Search of Chaco

New Approaches to an Archaeological Enigma
Author: David Grant Noble
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: N.A
Category: Religion
Page: 140
View: 5707

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Startling discoveries and impassioned debates have emerged from the "Chaco Phenomenon" since the publication of New Light on Chaco Canyon twenty years ago. This completely updated edition features seventeen original essays, scores of photographs, maps, and site plans, and the perspectives of archaeologists, historians, and Native American thinkers. Key topics include the rise of early great houses; the structure of agricultural life among the people of Chaco Canyon; their use of sacred geography and astronomy in organizing their spiritual cosmology; indigenous knowledge about Chaco from the perspective of Hopi, Tewa, and Navajo peoples; and the place of Chaco in the wider world of archaeology.For more than a century archaeologists and others have pursued Chaco Canyon's many and elusive meanings. In Search of Chaco brings these explorations to a new generation of enthusiasts.

Canyon of Dreams

Stories from Grand Canyon History
Author: Don Lago
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781607813149
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 2802

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An engaging storyteller brings to life true stories from Grand Canyon's human history