New Perspectives on Racial Identity Development

Integrating Emerging Frameworks, Second Edition
Author: Charmaine L. Wijeyesinghe,Bailey W. Jackson
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814724523
Category: Psychology
Page: 272
View: 1543

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New Perspectives on Racial Identity Development brings together leaders in the field to deepen, broaden, and reassess our understandings of racial identity development. Contributors include the authors of some of the earliest theories in the field, such as William Cross, Bailey W. Jackson, Jean Kim, Rita Hardiman, and Charmaine L. Wijeyesinghe, who offer new analysis of the impact of emerging frameworks on how racial identity is viewed and understood. Other contributors present new paradigms and identify critical issues that must be considered as the field continues to evolve. This new and completely rewritten second edition uses emerging research from related disciplines that offer innovative approaches that have yet to be fully discussed in the literature on racial identity. Intersectionality receives significant attention in the volume, as it calls for models of social identity to take a more holistic and integrated approach in describing the lived experience of individuals. This volume offers new perspectives on how we understand and study racial identity in a culture where race and other identities are socially constructed and carry significant societal, political, and group meaning.

New Perspectives on Racial Identity Development

A Theoretical and Practical Anthology
Author: Charmaine L. Wijeyesinghe,Bailey W. Jackson
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814793428
Category: Social Science
Page: 281
View: 2107

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Drug testing has become the norm in many workplaces. In order to get a job, potential employees are required to provide their urine for testing. Pissing on Demand examines this phenomenon along with the resulting rise of the anti-drug testing movement, or the "detox industry," that works to beat these tests. Strategies include over-the-counter products like "body flushers" that sound innocent but are really designed to mask the presence of illegal drugs to kits advertised in pro-drug publications like High Times that make no bones about their real purpose. The first exposé of the detox industry in all its manifestations, this book is required reading for anyone concerned with social control, privacy, and workers' rights.

Racial Identity Theory

Applications to Individual, Group, and Organizational Interventions
Author: Chalmer E. Thompson,Robert T. Carter
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113580799X
Category: Psychology
Page: 302
View: 1559

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Racial identity theories have been in the psychological literature for nearly thirty years. Unlike most references to racial identity, however, Thompson and Carter demonstrate the value of integrating RACE and IDENTITY as systematic components of human functioning. The editors and their contributors show how the infusion of racial identity theory with other psychological models can successfully yield more holistic considerations of client functioning and well-being. Fully respecting the mutual influence of personal and environmental factors to explanations of individual and group functioning, they apply complex theoretical notions to real-life cases in psychological practice. These authors contend that race is a pervasive and formidable force in society that affects the development and functioning of individuals and groups. In a recursive fashion, individuals and groups influence and, indeed, nurture the notion of race and societal racism. Arguing that mental health practitioners are in key, influential positions to pierce this cycle, the authors provide evidence of how meaningful change can occur when racial identity theory is integrated into interventions that attempt to diminish the distress people experience in their lives. The interventions illustrated in this volume are applied in various contexts, including psychotherapy and counseling, supervision, family therapy, support groups, and organizational and institutional environments. This book can serve the needs and interests of advanced-level students and professionals in all mental health fields, as well as researchers and scholars in such disciplines as organizational management and forensic psychology. It can also be of value to anyone interested in the systematic implementation of strategies to overcome problems of race.

Recognizing Race and Ethnicity

Power, Privilege, and Inequality
Author: Kathleen J. Fitzgerald
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 042997440X
Category: Social Science
Page: 592
View: 8250

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Despite promising changes over the last century, race remains a central organizing principle in US society, a key arena of inequality, power, and privilege, and the subject of ongoing conflict and debate. In this second edition of Recognizing Race and Ethnicity, Kathleen J. Fitzgerald continues to examine the sociology of race and encourages students to think differently by challenging the notion that we are, or should even aspire to be, color-blind. Fitzgerald considers how race manifests in both significant and obscure ways by looking across all racial/ethnic groups within the socio-historical context of institutions and arenas, rather than discussing each group by group. Incorporating recent research and contemporary theoretical perspectives, she guides students to examine racial ideologies and identities as well as structural racism; at the same time, she covers topics like popular culture, sports, and interracial relationships. This latest edition includes an expanded look at global perspectives on racial inequality, including international migration and Islamophobia; updated examples of contemporary issues, including the Black Lives Matter movement; more emphasis on intersectionality, specifically the ways sexuality and race intersect; and an extended discussion on why the sociology of race and the sociological imagination matter. Recognizing Race and Ethnicity continues to reflect the latest sociological research on race/ethnicity and provides unparalleled coverage of white privilege while remaining careful not to treat "white" as the norm against which all other groups are defined.

Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice


Author: Maurianne Adams,Lee Anne Bell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317688694
Category: Education
Page: 438
View: 9368

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For twenty years, Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice has been the definitive sourcebook of theoretical foundations, pedagogical and design frameworks, and curricular models for social justice teaching practice. Thoroughly revised and updated, this third edition continues in the tradition of its predecessors to cover the most relevant issues and controversies in social justice education in a practical, hands-on format. Filled with ready-to-apply activities and discussion questions, this book provides teachers and facilitators with an accessible pedagogical approach to issues of oppression in classrooms. The revised edition also focuses on providing students the tools needed to apply their learning about these issues. Features new to this edition include: A new bridging chapter focusing on the core concepts that need to be included in all SJE practice and illustrating ways of "getting started" teaching foundational core concepts and processes. A new chapter addressing the possibilities for adapting social justice education to online and blended courses. Expanded overview sections that highlight the historical contexts and legacies of oppression, opportunities for action and change, and the intersections among forms of oppression. Added coverage of key topics for teaching social justice issues, such as establishing a positive classroom climate, institutional and social manifestations of oppression, the global implications of contemporary SJE work, and action steps for addressing injustice. New and revised material for each of the core chapters in the book complemented by fully-developed online teaching designs, including over 150 downloadables, activities, and handouts on the book’s Companion Website (www.routledgetextbooks.com/textbooks/_author/teachingfordiversity). A classic for teachers across disciplines, Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice presents a thoughtful, well-constructed, and inclusive foundation for engaging students in the complex and often daunting problems of discrimination and inequality in American society.

Black and White Racial Identity

Theory, Research, and Practice
Author: Janet E. Helms
Publisher: Praeger Publishers
ISBN: 9780275946128
Category: Psychology
Page: 262
View: 5391

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This book examines the major theories of Black and White racial identity. Moreover, theoretical perspectives that were originally developed to describe social fomentation have been updated and expanded to explain the role of racial identity in counseling dyads, social relationships, and groups. Measures for assessing racial identity are described. Original research addresses the relationship of racial identity to other personality characteristics such as value orientations, decision-making styles and counseling process variables such as satisfaction, counselor strategies, and client reactions. Part 1 presents basic racial identity theory and measurement issues as they pertain to individuals and intergroup functioning. Ideally this material will be useful to persons who are seeking a basic introduction to Black and White racial identity theory. Part 2 introduces empirical attempts to examine the correlates of racial identity. This section is primarily intended for the reader who is interested in generating research questions and/or evaluating some of those that already have been generated. Part 3 includes speculative and empirical chapters that study the influence of racial identity on everyday interactions. This material also describes the influence of racial identity attitudes on various kinds of counseling interactions. The final chapter presents models for promoting identity development. This book should appeal to anyone interested in the social and behavioral sciences, including psychiatry, social work, and cross cultural psychology; nursing and education.

Social Class on Campus

Theories and Manifestations
Author: Will Barratt
Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC.
ISBN: 9781579225742
Category: Education
Page: 256
View: 3599

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This is at once a playful text with a serious purpose: to provide the reader with the theoretical lenses to analyze the dynamics of social class. It will appeal to students, and indeed anyone interested in how class mediates relationships in higher education, both because of its engaging tone, and because it uses the college campus as a microcosm for observing and analyzing the concept of class – and does so in a way that will prompt the reader to reflect on her or his location in the continuum of class, and understand how every member of the campus community helps co-construct social class. Will Barratt starts from the premise that there is more than one way to study any idea; and that the more tools we use to examine a concept, the more fully we understand it in all its complexity and ambiguity. To illustrate salient features of class on campus, he introduces five fictional European-American women – Whitney Page, Louise, Misty, Ursula, and Eleanor – and also includes the real stories of students who represent a diversity of backgrounds. Social class is often neglected or ignored as an important issue in the lives of students. The book provides the reader with a language for analyzing class, with theories of class that go beyond standard economic and sociological models, and examples of the manifestation of class – all toward the end of helping the reader have more agency in working with this difficult and challenging concept. This book is suitable for students going to college for the first time, for courses exploring multicultural issues in contemporary society, and for anyone professionally involved with students. Each chapter includes a suggested experience and reflection questions to prompt readers to explore their thinking and feeling about class, as well as class discussion questions.

Racially Mixed People in America


Author: Maria P. P. Root
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 0803941021
Category: Social Science
Page: 387
View: 3339

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Although America has been experiencing a biracial baby boom for the last 25 years, there has been a dearth of information about how racially mixed people identify and view themselves as well as relate to one another. Racially Mixed People in America bridges this gap and offers a comprehensive look at all the issues involved in doing research with mixed race people, all in the context of America's multiracial past and present.

Cultivating the Spirit

How College Can Enhance Students' Inner Lives
Author: Alexander W. Astin,Helen S. Astin,Jennifer A. Lindholm
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470875712
Category: Education
Page: 224
View: 621

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Praise for Cultivating the Spirit "A groundbreaking study of the spiritual growth of college students.... The spiritual dimension of higher education has been explored from a variety of angles for the past twenty years, but not until now have we had a competent and comprehensive body of data organized around well-defined dimensions of this complex phenomenon. This is an essential book for anyone in academia who cares about the education of the whole person." —Parker J. Palmer, author, The Heart of Higher Education, A Hidden Wholeness, Let Your Life Speak, and The Courage to Teach "An extremely important book for layperson and professional alike. A stunning wake-up call for higher education—highly recommended!" —Ken Wilber, author, The Integral Vision "Cultivating the Spirit makes a unique and important contribution to one of the least examined yet most fundamental questions about undergraduate education: how students acquire the values and convictions that help to give meaning and purpose to their lives.... The authors provide a wealth of valuable findings about this vital process and its effects on student achievement, well-being, and personal growth in college." —Derek Bok, former president, Harvard University, and author, The Politics of Happiness "The fruit of a decade of elegantly designed and compelling research, Cultivating the Spirit provides timely and significant data for reorienting the conversation about the relationships among intellectual inquiry, traditional academic values, and the formation of the inner life. Informative, clearly written, essential, and evocative reading for today's faculty across all institutions—public and private, secular and religious." —Sharon Daloz Parks, author, Big Questions, Worthy Dreams and Leadership Can Be Taught

Time and the Rhythms of Emancipatory Education

Rethinking the temporal complexity of self and society
Author: Michel Alhadeff-Jones
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317541294
Category: Education
Page: 226
View: 4024

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Time and the Rhythms of Emancipatory Education argues that by rethinking the way we relate to time, we can fundamentally rethink the way we conceive education. Beyond the contemporary rhetoric of acceleration, speed, urgency or slowness, this book provides an epistemological, historical and theoretical framework that will serve as a comprehensive resource for critical reflection on the relationship between the experience of time and emancipatory education. Drawing upon time and rhythm studies, complexity theories and educational research, Alhadeff-Jones reflects upon the temporal and rhythmic dimensions of education in order to (re)theorize and address current societal and educational challenges. The book is divided into three parts. The first begins by discussing the specificities inherent to the study of time in educational sciences. The second contextualizes the evolution of temporal constraints that determine the ways education is institutionalized, organized, and experienced. The third and final part questions the meanings of emancipatory education in a context of temporal alienation. This is the first book to provide a broad overview of European and North-American theories that inform both the ideas of time and rhythm in educational sciences, from school instruction, curriculum design and arts education, to vocational training, lifelong learning and educational policies. It will be of key interest to academics, researchers and postgraduate students in the fields of philosophy of education, sociology of education, history of education, psychology, curriculum and learning theory, and adult education.

A Guide to Planning & Implementing Instruction for Adults

A Theme-Based Approach
Author: John M. Dirkx,Suzanne M. Prenger
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
ISBN: N.A
Category: Education
Page: 159
View: 9717

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Adults learn more easily when classroom material is connected to their life experiences. A Guide for Planning and Implementing Instruction for Adults is an indispensable ?how to do it? guide for instructors and trainers in all areas of adult education who need a proven means of customizing what they teach to the needs and previous knowledge of their students. John Dirkx and Suzanne Prenger take a practical step-by-step approach, filling the book with a wealth of useful worksheets, charts, and graphs for use with theme-based instruction. They also give instructors a concise grounding in the theoretical base for this approach, covering such topics as how adults learn and how learning styles differ among adults. While sophisticated enough for experienced teachers, the book is an excellent resource for instructors and trainers who may have little or no classroom experience. The manual is especially suited to instructors of adult basic education, literacy education, English as a second language, and workplace basic education.

Identity In Adolescence


Author: Jane Kroger
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134462034
Category: Psychology
Page: 288
View: 4203

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Fully updated to include the most recent research and theoretical developments in the field, the third edition of Identity in Adolescence examines the two way interaction of individual and social context in the process of identity formation. Setting the developmental tradition in context, Jane Kroger begins by providing a brief overview of the theoretical approaches to adolescent identity formation currently in use. This is followed by a discussion of five developmental models which reflect a range of attempts from the oldest to among the most recent efforts to describe this process and include the work of Erik Erikson, Peter Blos, Lawrence Kohlberg, Jane Loevinger, and Robert Kegan. Although focussing on each theorist in turn, this volume also goes on to compare and integrate the varied theoretical models and research findings and sets out some of the practical implications for social response to adolescents. Different social and cultural conditions and their effect on the identity formation process are also covered as are contemporary contextual, narrative, and postmodern approaches to understanding and researching identity issues. The book is ideal reading for students of adolescence, identity and developmental psychology.

A History of Capitalism, 1500-1980


Author: Michel Beaud
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1583670408
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 348
View: 3802

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The conquest of the Americas inaugurated the slow accumulation of resources and the imperceptible structural transformations that culminated in the Industrial Revolution. From that moment on, capitalism grew and expanded with a dynamism and adaptability that are now all too familiar, profiting from wars and even managing to rebound after a series of devastating economic crises. In this highly-anticipated revised edition of the 1981 classic, Beaud extends one of the major strengths of the original: the interweaving of social, political, and economic factors in the context of history. At the same time, Beaud's analysis provides a realistic and thorough examination of the developments of capitalism in the last twenty years, including globalization, the accelerating speed of capital transfer, and the collapse of the Soviet empire and the subsequent absorption of its population into the world market. This new edition also offers a completely revised format that integrates diagrams and flow-charts not previously available in the English-language edition.

Culture Centers in Higher Education

Perspectives on Identity, Theory, and Practice
Author: Lori D. Patton
Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC.
ISBN: 9781579225124
Category: Education
Page: 230
View: 9132

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Are cultural centers ethnic enclaves of segregation, or safe havens that provide minority students with social support that promotes persistence and retention? Though Black cultural centers boast a 40-year history, there is much misinformation about them and the ethnic counterparts to which they gave rise. Moreover, little is known about their historical roots, current status, and future prospects. The literature has largely ignored the various culture center models, and the role that such centers play in the experiences of college students. This book fills a significant void in the research on ethnic minority cultural centers, offers the historic background to their establishment and development, considers the circumstances that led to their creation, examines the roles they play on campus, explores their impact on retention and campus climate, and provides guidelines for their management in the light of current issues and future directions. In the first part of this volume, the contributors provide perspectives on culture centers from the point of view of various racial/ethnic identity groups, Latina/o, Asian, American Indian, and African American. Part II offers theoretical perspectives that frame the role of culture centers from the point of view of critical race theory, student development theory, and a social justice framework. Part III focuses specifically on administrative and practice-oriented themes, addressing such issues as the relative merits of full- and part-time staff, of race/ethnic specific as opposed to multicultural centers, relations with the outside community, and integration with academic and student affairs to support the mission of the institution. For administrators and student affairs educators who are unfamiliar with these facilities, and want to support an increasingly diverse student body, this book situates such centers within the overall strategy of improving campus climate, and makes the case for sustaining them. Where none as yet exist, this book offers a rationale and blueprint for creating such centers. For leaders of culture centers this book constitutes a valuable tool for assessing their viability, improving their performance, and ensuring their future relevance – all considerations of increased importance when budgets and resources are strained. This book also provides a foundation for researchers interested in further investigating the role of these centers in higher education.

Shades of Black

Diversity in African-American Identity
Author: William E. Cross
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780877229490
Category: Psychology
Page: 296
View: 4573

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In this controversial and path-breaking book, William E. Cross, Jr., presents the diversity and texture that have always been the hallmark of Black psychology. Shades of Black explodes the myth that self-hatred is the dominant theme in Black identity. With a thorough review of social scientific literature on Negro identity conducted between 1936 and 1967, Cross demonstrates that important themes of mental health and adaptive strength have been frequently overlooked by scholars, both Black and White, obsessed with proving Black pathology. He examines the Black Power Movement and critics who credit this era with a comprehensive change in Black self-esteem. Allowing for a considerable gain in group identity among Black people during this period, Cross shows how, before this, working and middle class, and even many poor Black families were able to offer their progeny a legacy of mental health and personal strength that sustained them in their struggles for political and cultural consensus. Author note: William E. Cross, Jr., is a psychologist and Associate Professor in the Africana Studies and Research Center of Cornell University.

Innovations in Transformative Learning

Space, Culture, & the Arts
Author: Beth Fisher-Yoshida,Kathy Dee Geller,Steven A. Schapiro
Publisher: Peter Lang
ISBN: 9781433102912
Category: Education
Page: 308
View: 5827

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This book addresses the disparity between transformative learning theory as espoused and practiced in the classrooms of the academy, and its application beyond. It articulates new models of transformative education that integrate transformative learning theory with other models of change and development. The three editors and eleven contributors draw on both theory and practice to illustrate how transformative learning has been introduced to a variety of settings and cultures, and synergistically integrated with theories of communication, participatory action research, and communities of inquiry and practice. Organized around the themes of creating space for learning; looking though the lenses of culture, diversity, and difference; and animating awareness through the expressive and performative arts, this collection will broaden awareness and aid scholars, students, and practitioners in using transformative learning as an approach to adult learning and social and organizational change in a range of settings.

Contesting Stereotypes and Creating Identities

Social Categories, Social Identities, and Educational Participation
Author: Andrew J. Fuligni
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
ISBN: N.A
Category: Education
Page: 269
View: 3010

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Since the end of legal segregation in schools, most research on educational inequality has focused on economic and other structural obstacles to the academic achievement of disadvantaged groups. But in Contesting Stereotypes and Creating Identities, a distinguished group of psychologists and social scientists argue that stereotypes about the academic potential of some minority groups remain a significant barrier to their achievement. This groundbreaking volume examines how low institutional and cultural expectations of minorities hinder their academic success, how these stereotypes are perpetuated, and the ways that minority students attempt to empower themselves by redefining their identities. The contributors to Contesting Stereotypes and Creating Identities explore issues of ethnic identity and educational inequality from a broad range of disciplinary perspectives, drawing on historical analyses, social-psychological experiments, interviews, and observation. Meagan Patterson and Rebecca Bigler show that when teachers label or segregate students according to social categories (even in subtle ways), students are more likely to rank and stereotype one another, so educators must pay attention to the implicit or unintentional ways that they emphasize group differences. Many of the contributors contest John Ogbu’s theory that African Americans have developed an “oppositional culture” that devalues academic effort as a form of “acting white.” Daphna Oyserman and Daniel Brickman, in their study of black and Latino youth, find evidence that strong identification with their ethnic group is actually associated with higher academic motivation among minority youth. Yet, as Julie Garcia and Jennifer Crocker find in a study of African-American female college students, the desire to disprove negative stereotypes about race and gender can lead to anxiety, low self-esteem, and excessive, self-defeating levels of effort, which impede learning and academic success. The authors call for educational institutions to diffuse these threats to minority students’ identities by emphasizing that intelligence is a malleable rather than a fixed trait. Contesting Stereotypes and Creating Identities reveals the many hidden ways that educational opportunities are denied to some social groups. At the same time, this probing and wide-ranging anthology provides a fresh perspective on the creative ways that these groups challenge stereotypes and attempt to participate fully in the educational system.

The Limits of Whiteness

Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race
Author: Neda Maghbouleh
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 1503603431
Category: Social Science
Page: 248
View: 1941

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When Roya, an Iranian American high school student, is asked to identify her race, she feels anxiety and doubt. According to the federal government, she and others from the Middle East are white. Indeed, a historical myth circulates even in immigrant families like Roya's, proclaiming Iranians to be the "original" white race. But based on the treatment Roya and her family receive in American schools, airports, workplaces, and neighborhoods—interactions characterized by intolerance or hate—Roya is increasingly certain that she is not white. In The Limits of Whiteness, Neda Maghbouleh offers a groundbreaking, timely look at how Iranians and other Middle Eastern Americans move across the color line. By shadowing Roya and more than 80 other young people, Maghbouleh documents Iranian Americans' shifting racial status. Drawing on never-before-analyzed historical and legal evidence, she captures the unique experience of an immigrant group trapped between legal racial invisibility and everyday racial hyper-visibility. Her findings are essential for understanding the unprecedented challenge Middle Easterners now face under "extreme vetting" and potential reclassification out of the "white" box. Maghbouleh tells for the first time the compelling, often heartbreaking story of how a white American immigrant group can become brown and what such a transformation says about race in America.

Preventing Prejudice

A Guide for Counselors, Educators, and Parents
Author: Joseph G. Ponterotto,Shawn O. Utsey,Paul B. Pedersen
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9780761928188
Category: Education
Page: 358
View: 7489

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The Second Edition of Preventing Prejudice: A Guide for Counselors, Educators, and Parents has been completely revised and expanded to provide the most up-to-date and extensive coverage of prejudice and racism available. The new edition of this bestselling text presents a comprehensive overview of these topics and also includes practical tools for combating prejudice development in children, adolescents, and adults.

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?

And Other Conversations About Race
Author: Beverly Daniel Tatum
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 1541616588
Category: Social Science
Page: 464
View: 516

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The classic, bestselling book on the psychology of racism--now fully revised and updated Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Is this self-segregation a problem to address or a coping strategy? Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, argues that straight talk about our racial identities is essential if we are serious about enabling communication across racial and ethnic divides. These topics have only become more urgent as the national conversation about race is increasingly acrimonious. This fully revised edition is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the dynamics of race in America. "An unusually sensitive work about the racial barriers that still divide us in so many areas of life."-Jonathan Kozol