Landscapes of Power

Politics of Energy in the Navajo Nation
Author: Dana E. Powell
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822372290
Category: Social Science
Page: 336
View: 1156

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In Landscapes of Power Dana E. Powell examines the rise and fall of the controversial Desert Rock Power Plant initiative in New Mexico to trace the political conflicts surrounding native sovereignty and contemporary energy development on Navajo (Diné) Nation land. Powell's historical and ethnographic account shows how the coal-fired power plant project's defeat provided the basis for redefining the legacies of colonialism, mineral extraction, and environmentalism. Examining the labor of activists, artists, politicians, elders, technicians, and others, Powell emphasizes the generative potential of Navajo resistance to articulate a vision of autonomy in the face of twenty-first-century colonial conditions. Ultimately, Powell situates local Navajo struggles over energy technology and infrastructure within broader sociocultural life, debates over global climate change, and tribal, federal, and global politics of extraction.

Archaeology and Ancient Religion in the American Midcontinent


Author: Brad H. Koldehoff,Timothy R. Pauketat
Publisher: University Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817319964
Category: Social Science
Page: 366
View: 7890

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Analyses of big datasets signal important directions for the archaeology of religion in the Archaic to Mississippian Native North America Across North America, huge data accumulations derived from decades of cultural resource management studies, combined with old museum collections, provide archaeologists with unparalleled opportunities to explore new questions about the lives of ancient native peoples. For many years the topics of technology, economy, and political organization have received the most research attention, while ritual, religion, and symbolic expression have largely been ignored. This was often the case because researchers considered such topics beyond reach of their methods and data. In Archaeology and Ancient Religion in the American Midcontinent, editors Brad H. Koldehoff and Timothy R. Pauketat and their contributors demonstrate that this notion is outdated through their analyses of a series of large datasets from the midcontinent, ranging from tiny charred seeds to the cosmic alignments of mounds, they consider new questions about the religious practices and lives of native peoples. At the core of this volume are case studies that explore religious practices from the Cahokia area and surrounding Illinois uplands. Additional chapters explore these topics using data collected from sites and landscapes scattered along the Mississippi and Ohio River valleys. This innovative work facilitates a greater appreciation for, and understanding of, ancient native religious practices, especially their seamless connections to everyday life and livelihood. The contributors do not advocate for a reduced emphasis on technology, economy, and political organization; rather, they recommend expanding the scope of such studies to include considerations of how religious practices shaped the locations of sites, the character of artifacts, and the content and arrangement of sites and features. They also highlight analytical approaches that are applicable to archaeological datasets from across the Americas and beyond.

Crafting in the World

Materiality in the Making
Author: Clare T. Burke,Suzanne M. Spencer-Wood
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319650882
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
View: 4918

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The volume expands understandings of crafting practices, which in the past was the major relational interaction between the social agency of materials, technology, and people, in co-creating an emergent ever-changing world. The chapters discuss different ways that crafting in the present is useful in understanding crafting experiences and methods in the past, including experiments to reproduce ancient excavated objects, historical accounts of crafting methods and experiences, craft revivals, and teaching historical crafts at museums and schools. The volume is unique in the diversity of its theoretical and multidisciplinary approaches to researching crafting, not just as a set of techniques for producing functional objects, but as social practices and technical choices embodying cultural ideas, knowledge, and multiple interwoven social networks. Crafting expresses and constitutes mental schemas, identities, ideologies, and cultures. The multiple meanings and significances of crafting are explored from a great variety of disciplinary perspectives, including anthropology, archaeology, sociology, education, psychology, women’s studies, and ethnic studies. This book provides a deep temporal range and a global geographical scope, with case studies ranging from Europe, Africa, and Asia to the Americas and a global internet website for selling home crafted items.

Don't Make Me Pull Over!

An Informal History of the Family Road Trip
Author: Richard Ratay
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501188763
Category: Travel
Page: 288
View: 3077

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Part pop history and part whimsical memoir in the spirit of National Lampoon's Vacation—Don’t Make Me Pull Over! is a nostalgic look at the golden age of family road trips—a halcyon era that culminated in the latter part of the twentieth century, before portable DVD players, iPods, and Google Maps. In the days before cheap air travel, families didn’t so much take vacations as survive them. Between home and destination lay thousands of miles and dozens of annoyances, and with his family Richard Ratay experienced all of them—from being crowded into the backseat with noogie-happy older brothers, to picking out a souvenir only to find that a better one might have been had at the next attraction, to dealing with a dad who didn’t believe in bathroom breaks. The birth of America's first interstate highways in the 1950s hit the gas pedal on the road trip phenomenon and families were soon streaming—sans seatbelts!—to a range of sometimes stirring, sometimes wacky locations. Frequently, what was remembered the longest wasn’t Mount Rushmore, Yellowstone, or Disney World, but such roadside attractions as “The Thing” in Texas Canyon, Arizona, or “The Mystery Spot” in Santa Cruz, California. In this road tourism-crazy era that stretched through the 1970’s, national parks attendance swelled to 165 million, and a whopping 2.2 million people visited Gettysburg each year, thirteen times the number of soldiers who fought in the battle. Now, decades later, Ratay offers a paean to what was lost, showing how family togetherness was eventually sacrificed to electronic distractions and the urge to "get there now." In hundreds of amusing ways, he reminds us of what once made the Great American Family Road Trip so great, including twenty-foot “land yachts,” oasis-like Holiday Inn “Holidomes,” “Smokey"-spotting Fuzzbusters, 28 glorious flavors of Howard Johnson’s ice cream, and the thrill of finding a “good buddy” on the CB radio. A rousing Ratay family ride-along, Don’t Make Me Pull Over! reveals how the family road trip came to be, how its evolution mirrored the country’s, and why those magical journeys that once brought families together—for better and worse—have largely disappeared.

Red Ink

Native Americans Picking Up the Pen in the Colonial Period
Author: Drew Lopenzina
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438439806
Category: History
Page: 412
View: 9846

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The Native peoples of colonial New England were quick to grasp the practical functions of Western literacy. Their written literary output was composed to suit their own needs and expressed views often in resistance to the agendas of the European colonists they were confronted with. Red Ink is an engaging retelling of American colonial history, one that draws on documents that have received scant critical and scholarly attention to offer an important new interpretation grounded in indigenous contexts and perspectives. Author Drew Lopenzina reexamines a literature that has been compulsively “corrected” and overinscribed with the norms and expectations of the dominant culture, while simultaneously invoking the often violent tensions of “contact” and the processes of unwitnessing by which Native histories and accomplishments were effectively erased from the colonial record. In a compelling narrative arc, Lopenzina enables the reader to travel through a history that, however familiar, has never been fully appreciated or understood from a Native-centered perspective.

They Shall Not Pass

The French Army on the Western Front 1914-1918
Author: Ian Sumner
Publisher: Pen and Sword
ISBN: 1848842090
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 7023

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This graphic collection of first-hand accounts sheds new light on the experiences of the French army during the Great War. It reveals in authentic detail the perceptions and emotions of soldiers and civilians who were caught up in the most destructive conflict the world had ever seen. Their testimony gives a striking insight into the mentality of the troops and their experience of combat, their emotional ties to their relatives at home, their opinions about their commanders and their fellow soldiers, the appalling conditions and dangers they endured, and their attitude to their German enemy. In their own words, in diaries, letters, reports and memoirs - most of which have never been published in English before - they offer a fascinating inside view of the massive life-and-death struggle that took place on the Western Front. Ian Sumner provides a concise narrative of the war in order to give a clear context to the eyewitness material. In effect the reader is carried through the experience of each phase of the war on the Western Front and sees events as soldiers and civilians saw them at the time. This emphasis on eyewitness accounts provides an approach to the subject that is completely new for an English-language publication. The authorÍs pioneering work will appeal to readers who may know something about the British and German armies on the Western Front, but little about the French army which bore the brunt of the fighting on the allied side. His book represents a milestone in publishing on the Great War.

The Risen Phoenix

Black Politics in the Post–Civil War South
Author: Luis-Alejandro Dinnella-Borrego
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 0813938732
Category: Social Science
Page: 304
View: 9877

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The Risen Phoenix charts the changing landscape of black politics and political culture in the postwar South by focusing on the careers of six black congressmen who served between the Civil War and the turn of the nineteenth century: John Mercer Langston of Virginia, James Thomas Rapier of Alabama, Robert Smalls of South Carolina, John Roy Lynch of Mississippi, Josiah Thomas Walls of Florida, and George Henry White of North Carolina. Drawing on a rich combination of traditional political history, gender and black history, and the history of U.S. foreign relations, the book argues that African American congressmen effectively served their constituents’ interests while also navigating their way through a tumultuous post–Civil War Southern political environment. Black congressmen represented their constituents by advancing a policy agenda encompassing strong civil rights protections, economic modernization, and expanded access to education. Local developments such as antiblack aggression and violent electoral contests shaped the policies supported by newly elected black congressmen, including the tactical decision to support amnesty for ex-Confederates. Yet black congressmen ultimately embraced their role as national leaders and as spokesmen not only for their congressional districts and states but for all African Americans throughout the South. As these black leaders searched for effective ways to respond to white supremacy, disenfranchisement, segregation, and lynching, they challenged the barriers of prejudice, paving the way for future black struggles for equality in the twentieth century.

Curator of Ephemera at the New Museum for Archaic Media


Author: Heid E. Erdrich
Publisher: MSU Press
ISBN: 1628952989
Category: Poetry
Page: 100
View: 5814

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Heid E. Erdrich writes from the present into the future where human anxiety lives. Many of her poems engage ekphrasis around the visual work of contemporary artists who, like Erdrich, are Anishinaabe. Poems in this collection also curate unmountable exhibits in not-yet-existent museums devoted to the ephemera of communication and technology. A central trope is the mixtape, an ephemeral form that Erdrich explores in its role of carrying the romantic angst of American couples. These poems recognize how our love of technology and how the extraction industries on indigenous lands that technology requires threaten our future and obscure the realities of indigenous peoples who know what it is to survive apocalypse. Deeply eco-poetic poems extend beyond the page in poemeos, collaboratively made poem films accessible in the text through the new but already archaic use of QR codes. Collaborative poems highlighting lessons in Anishinaabemowin also broaden the context of Erdrich’s work. Despite how little communications technology has helped to bring people toward understanding one another, these poems speak to the keen human yearning to connect as they urge engagement of the image, the moment, the sensual, and the real.

What Remains

Everyday Encounters with the Socialist Past in Germany
Author: Jonathan Bach
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231544308
Category: Social Science
Page: 200
View: 7401

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What happens when an entire modern state's material culture becomes abruptly obsolete? How do ordinary people encounter what remains? In this ethnography, Jonathan Bach examines the afterlife of East Germany following the fall of the Berlin Wall, as things and places from that vanished socialist past continue to circulate and shape the politics of memory. What Remains traces the unsettling effects of these unmoored artifacts on the German present, arguing for a rethinking of the role of the everyday as a site of reckoning with difficult pasts. Bach juxtaposes four sites where the stakes of the everyday appear: products commodified as nostalgia, amateur museums dedicated to collecting everyday life under socialism, the "people's palace" that captured the national imagination through its destruction, and the feared and fetishized Berlin Wall. Moving from the local, the intimate, and the small to the national, the impersonal, and the large, this book's interpenetrating chapters show the unexpected social and political force of the ordinary in the production of memory. What Remains offers a unique vantage point on the workings of the everyday in situations of radical discontinuity, contributing to new understandings of postsocialism and the intricate intersection of material remains and memory.

Do Glaciers Listen?

Local Knowledge, Colonial Encounters and Social Imagination
Author: Julie Cruikshank
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774851406
Category: HISTORY
Page: 328
View: 4891

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Do Glaciers Listen? explores the conflicting depictions of glaciers to show how natural and cultural histories are objectively entangled in the Mount Saint Elias ranges. This rugged area, where Alaska, British Columbia, and the Yukon Territory now meet, underwent significant geophysical change in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, which coincided with dramatic social upheaval resulting from European exploration and increased travel and trade among Aboriginal peoples. European visitors brought with them varying conceptions of nature as sublime, as spiritual, or as a resource for human progress. They saw glaciers as inanimate, subject to empirical investigation and measurement. Aboriginal oral histories, conversely, described glaciers as sentient, animate, and quick to respond to human behaviour. In each case, however, the experiences and ideas surrounding glaciers were incorporated into interpretations of social relations. Focusing on these contrasting views during the late stages of the Little Ice Age (1550-1900), Cruikshank demonstrates how local knowledge is produced, rather than discovered, through colonial encounters, and how it often conjoins social and biophysical processes. She then traces how the divergent views weave through contemporary debates about cultural meanings as well as current discussions about protected areas, parks, and the new World Heritage site. Readers interested in anthropology and Native and northern studies will find this a fascinating read and a rich addition to circumpolar literature.

The Golden Band from Tigerland

A History of LSU's Marching Band
Author: Tom Continé,Faye Phillips
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 9780807163504
Category: Social Science
Page: 184
View: 7700

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Well over a century has passed since two cadets of the Ole War Skule decided to create a brass band for their university, beginning a tradition that continues to the present day. World renowned for its commitment to excellence, LSU’s Golden Band from Tigerland celebrates the sports endeavors of the school teams, creates pride in school traditions, and entertains millions of fans every year. This beautifully illustrated history of LSU’s beloved marching band moves from its military inspiration through the directorships of Castro Carazo, William F. Swor, and Frank B. Wickes to the first female drum major, Kristie Smith, in 1999. Tom Continé and Faye Phillips highlight the band’s recent triumphs as well, including the Sudler Trophy awarded by the John Philip Sousa Foundation, induction into the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame, and traveling abroad to march in Hong Kong’s Chinese New Year celebration and Dublin’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade. The excitement of the Pregame Salute, the triumphant spirit of the halftime show, and the hard work that goes into the performances are all captured here in 150 spectacular photographs. Above all, The Golden Band from Tigerland serves as an enduring tribute to the generations of LSU students whose talent and energy transformed a small brass group into an acclaimed marching band.

Paul Goble Gallery

Three Native American Stories
Author: Paul Goble
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
ISBN: 9780689822193
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 112
View: 5634

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A breathtaking collection of three complete classics--Her Seven Brothers, The Gift of the Sacred Dog, and The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses--displays the author's brilliant artwork and his passion for the Native American Landscape and rich storytelling tradition.

Native Americans, Christianity, and the Reshaping of the American Religious Landscape


Author: Joel W. Martin,Mark A. Nicholas
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807834068
Category: Social Science
Page: 325
View: 9147

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The essays here explore a variety of post-contact identities, including indigenous Christians, "mission friendly" non-Christians, and ex-Christians, thereby exploring the shifting world of Native-white cultural and religious exchange. Rather than questioning the authenticity of Native Christian experiences, these scholars reveal how indigenous peoples negotiated change with regard to missions, missionaries, and Christianity. This collection challenges the pervasive stereotype of Native Americans as culturally static and ill-equipped to navigate the roiling currents associated with colonialism and missionization."--pub. desc.

India Calling


Author: Anand Giridharadas
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 1458763099
Category:
Page: 384
View: 6083

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Reversing his parents immigrant path, a young writer returns to India and discovers an old country making itself new. Anand Giridharadas sensed something was afoot as his plane prepared to land in Bombay. An elderly passenger looked at him and said, Were all trying to go that way, pointing to the rear. You, youre going this way. Giridharadas was returning to the land of his ancestors, amid an unlikely economic boom. But he was interested less in its gold rush than in its cultural upheaval, as a new generation has sought to reconcile old traditions with new ambitions. In India Calling, Giridharadas brings to life the people and the dilemmas of India today, as seen through the prism of his migr family history and his childhood memories. He blends the objectivity of the outsider with the intimacy of the insider. The result is India seen at once from within and without. Giridharadas introduces us to entrepreneurs, radicals, industrialists and religious seekers, but, most of all, to Indian families. Through their stories, and his own, he paints an intimate portrait of a country becoming modern while striving to remain itself.

Karl Bodmer's North American Prints


Author: Karl Bodmer
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803213265
Category: Art
Page: 382
View: 1546

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In 1832, twenty-two-year-old Swiss artist Karl Bodmer was employed to create a "faithful and vivid image" of America and its people. This book contains 431 illustrations (most in color), which reflect the updating of Bodmer's documenting process, and essays and appendices elucidating all aspects of the project.

Crystals and Sacred Sites

Use Crystals to Access the Power of Sacred Landscapes for Personal and Planetary Transformation
Author: Judy Hall
Publisher: Fair Winds Press
ISBN: 1610586263
Category: Body, Mind & Spirit
Page: 192
View: 1463

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From the pyramids of Giza to Stonehenge to Machu Picchu, people are captivated by the magic of the world’s most sacred and mysterious sites. Crystals and Sacred Sites teaches you how to tap into the healing energy of these sites from anywhere in the world using the power of crystals and sacred stones. Noted crystal authority Judy Hall takes you to the most revered sacred sites in the ancient world as well as newly discovered ones that are emerging as power points critical to our evolution as a planet. With the assistance of specially selected crystals and accompanying meditations and rituals, you can open the doorways to transformation and healing.