Minds, Brains, and Law

The Conceptual Foundations of Law and Neuroscience
Author: Michael S. Pardo,Dennis Patterson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199812136
Category: Law
Page: 240
View: 1659

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This book addresses the philosophical questions that arise when neuroscientific research and technology are applied in the legal system. The empirical, practical, ethical, and conceptual issues that Pardo and Patterson seek to redress will deeply influence how we negotiate and implement the fruits of neuroscience in law and policy in the future.

Minds, Brains, and Law

The Conceptual Foundations of Law and Neuroscience
Author: Michael S. Pardo,Dennis Patterson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019025310X
Category: Law
Page: 276
View: 2425

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Cognitive neuroscientists have deepened our understanding of the complex relationship between mind and brain and complicated the relationship between mental attributes and law. New arguments and conclusions based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG), and other increasingly sophisticated technologies are being applied to debates and processes in the legal field, from lie detection to legal doctrine surrounding criminal law, including the insanity defense to legal theory. In Minds, Brains, and Law, Michael S. Pardo and Dennis Patterson analyze questions that lie at the core of implementing neuroscientific research and technology within the legal system. They examine the arguments favoring increased use of neuroscience in law, the scientific evidence available for the reliability of neuroscientific evidence in legal proceedings, and the integration of neuroscientific research into substantive legal doctrines. The authors also explore the basic philosophical questions that lie at the intersection of law, mind, and neuroscience. In doing so, they argue that mistaken inferences and conceptual errors arise from mismatched concepts, such as the disconnect between lying and what constitutes "lying" in many neuroscientific studies. The empirical, practical, ethical, and conceptual issues that Pardo and Patterson seek to redress will deeply influence how we negotiate and implement the fruits of neuroscience in law and policy in the future. This paperback edition contain a new Preface covering developments in this subject since the hardcover edition published in 2013.

Philosophical Foundations of Law and Neuroscience


Author: Michael S. Pardo
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198743092
Category:
Page: 272
View: 7320

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The intersection between law and neuroscience has been a focus of intense research for the past decade, as an unprecedented amount of attention has been triggered by the increased use of neuroscientific evidence in courts. While the majority of this attention is currently devoted to criminal law, including capital cases, the wide-ranging proposals for how neuroscience may inform issues of law and public policy extend to virtually every substantive area in law. Bringing together the latest work from leading scholars in the field, this volume examines the philosophical issues that inform this emerging and vibrant subfield of law. From discussions featuring the philosophy of the mind to neuroscience-based lie detection, each chapter addresses foundational questions that arise in the application of neuroscientific technology in the legal sphere.

Law and Truth


Author: Dennis Patterson
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780195132472
Category: Law
Page: 189
View: 2891

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Taking up a single question - 'What does it mean to say that a proposition of law is true?' - this book advances a major new account of truth in law. Drawing upon the later philosophy of Wittgenstein, as well as more recent postmodern theory of the relationship between language, meaning, and the world, Patterson examines leading contemporary jurisprudential approaches to this question and finds them flawed in similar and previously unnoticed ways. Despite surface differences, the most widely discussed accounts of legal meaning - from moral realism to interpretivism - each commit themselves, Patterson argues, to a defective notion of reference in accounting for the truth of legal propositions. Tracing this common truth-conditional perspective - wherein propositions of law are true in virtue of some condition, be it a moral essence, a social fact, or communal agreement - to its source in modernism, Patterson develops an alternative (postmodern) account of legal justification, one in which linguistic practice - the use of forms of legal argument - holds the key to legal meaning.

A Primer on Criminal Law and Neuroscience

A Contribution of the Law and Neuroscience Project, Supported by the MacArthur Foundation
Author: Stephen J. Morse,Adina L. Roskies
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199859175
Category: Law
Page: 293
View: 4403

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This handbook, the result of a three-year multidisciplinary initiative supported by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur foundation, brings lawyers, neuroscientists, and philosophers together to explore the appropriate relation between neuroscience and law.

Philosophical Foundations of Neurolaw


Author: Martin Roth
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 149853967X
Category: Philosophy
Page: 236
View: 9864

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The central philosophical issue confronting neurolaw is whether we can reconcile the conception of ourselves as free, responsible agents with the conception of ourselves as complex physical machines. This book develops and defends an account of free and responsible agency that shows how such reconciliation is possible.

Law and Neuroscience


Author: Owen D. Jones,Jeffrey D. Schall,Francis X. Shen
Publisher: Wolters Kluwer Law & Business
ISBN: 1454847034
Category: Law
Page: 816
View: 733

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The implications for law of new neuroscientific techniques and findings are now among the hottest topics in legal, academic, and media venues. Law and Neuroscience – a collaboration of professors in law, neuroscience, and biology – is the first coursebook to chart this new territory, providing the world’s most comprehensive collection of neurolaw materials. Features: Designed from the ground up with extensive e-capability in mind, with each e-chapter extensively linked to outside sources. Technical subjects explained in an accessible and user-friendly manner. Extensive glossary of key terms. Covers highly current material; over 60% of the cases and publications included were published since 2008

Neuroscience and Legal Responsibility


Author: Nicole A Vincent
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199925615
Category: Medical
Page: 408
View: 7766

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Adopting a broadly compatibilist approach, this volume's authors argue that the behavioral and mind sciences do not threaten the moral foundations of legal responsibility. Rather, these sciences provide fresh insight into human agency and updated criteria as well as powerful diagnostic and intervention tools for assessing and altering minds.

The Moral Conflict of Law and Neuroscience


Author: Peter A. Alces
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022651353X
Category: Law
Page: 368
View: 8949

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Law relies on a conception of human agency, the idea that humans are capable of making their own choices and are morally responsible for the consequences. But what if that is not the case? Over the past half century, the story of the law has been one of increased acuity concerning the human condition, especially the workings of the brain. The law already considers select cognitive realities in evaluating questions of agency and responsibility, such as age, sanity, and emotional distress. As new neuroscientific research comprehensively calls into question the very idea of free will, how should the law respond to this revised understanding? Peter A. Alces considers where and how the law currently fails to appreciate the neuroscientific revelation that humans may in key ways lack normative free will--and therefore moral responsibility. The most accessible setting in which to consider the potential impact of neuroscience is criminal law, as certain aspects of criminal law already reveal the naivet� of most normative reasoning, such as the inconsistent treatment of people with equally disadvantageous cognitive deficits, whether congenital or acquired. But tort and contract law also assume a flawed conception of human agency and responsibility. Alces reveals the internal contradictions of extant legal doctrine and concludes by considering what would be involved in constructing novel legal regimes based on emerging neuroscientific insights.

Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience


Author: M. R. Bennett,P. M. S. Hacker
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9781405108386
Category: Philosophy
Page: 480
View: 6884

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In this provocative survey, a distinguished philosopher and a leading neuroscientist outline the conceptual problems at the heart of cognitive neuroscience. Surveys the conceptual problems inherent in many neuroscientific theories. Encourages neuroscientists to pay more attention to conceptual questions. Provides conceptual maps for students and researchers in cognitive neuroscience and psychology. Written by a distinguished philosopher and leading neuroscientist. Avoids the use of philosophical jargon. Constitutes an essential reference work for elucidation of concepts in cognitive neuroscience and psychology.

Second Nature

Brain Science and Human Knowledge
Author: Gerald M. Edelman
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300133653
Category: Medical
Page: 216
View: 3472

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Burgeoning advances in brain science are opening up new perspectives on how we acquire knowledge. Indeed, it is now possible to explore consciousness - the very centre of human concern - by scientific means. In this illuminating book, Dr. Gerald M. Edelman offers a new theory of knowledge based on striking scientific findings about how the brain works. And he addresses the related compelling question: does the latest research imply that all knowledge can be reduced to scientific description? Edelman's brain-based approach to knowledge has rich implications for our understanding of creativity, of the normal and abnormal functioning of the brain, and of the connections among the different ways we have of knowing. While the gulf between science and the humanities and their respective views of the world has seemed enormous in the past, the author shows that their differences can be dissolved by considering their origins in brain functions. He foresees a day when brain-based devices will be conscious, and he reflects on this and other fascinating ideas about how we come to know the world and ourselves.

The Origin of Ideas

Blending, Creativity, and the Human Spark
Author: Mark Turner
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019998882X
Category: Medical
Page: 300
View: 9092

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Humans are unique among all other species in having one cognitive attribute-the ability, almost without conscious effort, to engage in blending. This is the first book that brings the theory of blending to a wide audience and shows how blending is at the heart of the origin of ideas.

Mind, Matter and Quantum Mechanics


Author: Henry P. Stapp
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3540896538
Category: Philosophy
Page: 300
View: 4584

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Leading quantum physicist Stapp focuses in this book on the problem of consciousness and explains how quantum mechanics allows causally effective conscious thought to be combined in a natural way with the physical brain made of neurons and atoms.

Theory and Reality

An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science
Author: Peter Godfrey-Smith
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226300610
Category: Science
Page: 288
View: 2789

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How does science work? Does it tell us what the world is "really" like? What makes it different from other ways of understanding the universe? In Theory and Reality, Peter Godfrey-Smith addresses these questions by taking the reader on a grand tour of one hundred years of debate about science. The result is a completely accessible introduction to the main themes of the philosophy of science. Intended for undergraduates and general readers with no prior background in philosophy, Theory and Reality covers logical positivism; the problems of induction and confirmation; Karl Popper's theory of science; Thomas Kuhn and "scientific revolutions"; the views of Imre Lakatos, Larry Laudan, and Paul Feyerabend; and challenges to the field from sociology of science, feminism, and science studies. The book then looks in more detail at some specific problems and theories, including scientific realism, the theory-ladeness of observation, scientific explanation, and Bayesianism. Finally, Godfrey-Smith defends a form of philosophical naturalism as the best way to solve the main problems in the field. Throughout the text he points out connections between philosophical debates and wider discussions about science in recent decades, such as the infamous "science wars." Examples and asides engage the beginning student; a glossary of terms explains key concepts; and suggestions for further reading are included at the end of each chapter. However, this is a textbook that doesn't feel like a textbook because it captures the historical drama of changes in how science has been conceived over the last one hundred years. Like no other text in this field, Theory and Reality combines a survey of recent history of the philosophy of science with current key debates in language that any beginning scholar or critical reader can follow.

The Emperor's New Mind

Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics
Author: Roger Penrose
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198784929
Category: Computers
Page: 602
View: 1231

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For many decades, the proponents of `artificial intelligence' have maintained that computers will soon be able to do everything that a human can do. In his bestselling work of popular science, Sir Roger Penrose takes us on a fascinating tour through the basic principles of physics, cosmology, mathematics, and philosophy to show that human thinking can never be emulated by a machine. Oxford Landmark Science books are 'must-read' classics of modern science writing which have crystallized big ideas, and shaped the way we think.

Minds, Brains, and Computers

An Historical Introduction to the Foundations of Cognitive Science
Author: Robert M. Harnish,Denise D. Cummins
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9781557868763
Category: Philosophy
Page: 576
View: 3169

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Minds, Brains, and Computers presents a vital resource -- the most comprehensive interdisciplinary selection of seminal papers in the foundations of cognitive science, from leading figures in artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience.

Fundamental Neuroscience


Author: Larry R. Squire
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 0123858704
Category: Medical
Page: 1127
View: 7508

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Fundamental Neuroscience, 3rd Edition introduces graduate and upper-level undergraduate students to the full range of contemporary neuroscience. Addressing instructor and student feedback on the previous edition, all of the chapters are rewritten to make this book more concise and student-friendly than ever before. Each chapter is once again heavily illustrated and provides clinical boxes describing experiments, disorders, and methodological approaches and concepts. A companion web site contains test questions, and an imagebank of the figures for ready use in presentations, slides, and handouts. Capturing the promise and excitement of this fast-moving field, Fundamental Neuroscience, 3rd Edition is the text that students will be able to reference throughout their neuroscience careers! New to this edition: * 30% new material including new chapters on Dendritic Development and Spine Morphogenesis, Chemical Senses, Cerebellum, Eye Movements, Circadian Timing, Sleep and Dreaming, and Consciousness * Companion website with figures, web links to additional material, and test questions * Additional text boxes describing key experiments, disorders, methods, and concepts * Multiple model system coverage beyond rats, mice, and monkeys * Extensively expanded index for easier referencing

The Oxford Handbook of Cultural Neuroscience


Author: Joan Chiao,Shu-Chen Li,Robert Turner
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199357374
Category: Cognition and culture
Page: 432
View: 8037

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This Handbook examines disparities in public health by highlighting recent theoretical and methodological advances in cultural neuroscience. It traces the interactions of cultural, biological, and environmental factors that create adverse physical and mental health conditions among populations, and investigates how the policies of cultural and governmental institutions influence such outcomes. In addition to providing an overview of the current research, chapters demonstrate how a cultural neuroscience approach to the study of the mind, brain, and behavior can help stabilize the quality of health of societies at large. The volume will appeal especially to graduate students and professional scholars working in psychology and population genetics. The Oxford Handbook of Cultural Neuroscience represents the first collection of scholarly contributions from the International Cultural Neuroscience Consortium (ICNC), an interdisciplinary group of scholars from epidemiology, anthropology, psychology, neuroscience, genetics, and psychiatry dedicated to advancing an understanding of culture and health using theory and methods from cultural neuroscience. The Handbook is intended to introduce future generations of scholars to foundations in cultural neuroscience, and to equip them to address the grand challenges in global mental health in the twenty-first century.

How Our Emotions and Bodies are Vital for Abstract Thought

Perfect Mathematics for Imperfect Minds
Author: Anna Sverdlik
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351344757
Category: Psychology
Page: 218
View: 5616

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If mathematics is the purest form of knowledge, the perfect foundation of all the hard sciences, and a uniquely precise discipline, then how can the human brain, an imperfect and imprecise organ, process mathematical ideas? Is mathematics made up of eternal, universal truths? Or, as some have claimed, could mathematics simply be a human invention, a kind of tool or metaphor? These questions are among the greatest enigmas of science and epistemology, discussed at length by mathematicians, physicians, and philosophers. But, curiously enough, neuroscientists have been absent in the debate, even though it is precisely the field of neuroscience—which studies the brain’s mechanisms for thinking and reasoning—that ought to be at the very center of these discussions. How our Emotions and Bodies are Vital for Abstract Thought explores the unique mechanisms of cooperation between the body, emotions, and the cortex, based on fundamental physical principles. It is these mechanisms that help us to overcome the limitations of our physiology and allow our imperfect, human brains to make transcendent mathematical discoveries. This book is written for anyone who is interested in the nature of abstract thought, including mathematicians, physicists, computer scientists, psychologists, and psychiatrists.

Evidence of the Law

Proving Legal Claims
Author: Gary Lawson
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022643205X
Category: Law
Page: 264
View: 9139

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"As Gary Lawson shows, legal claims are inherently objects of proof, and whether or not the law acknowledges the point openly, proof of legal claims is just a special case of the more general norms governing proof of any claim. As a result, similar principles of evidentiary admissibility, standards of proof, and burdens of proof operate, and must operate, in the background of claims about the law. This book brings these evidentiary principles for proving law out of the shadows so that they can be analyzed, clarified, and discussed."--Amazon website.