Millennials Rising

The Next Great Generation
Author: Neil Howe,William Strauss
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307557944
Category: Social Science
Page: 432
View: 889

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By the authors of the bestselling 13th Gen, an incisive, in-depth examination of the Millennials--the generation born after 1982. In this remarkable account, certain to stir the interest of educators, counselors, parents, and people in all types of business as well as young people themselves, Neil Howe and William Strauss provide the definitive analysis of a powerful generation: the Millennials. Having looked at oceans of data, taken their own polls, talked to hundreds of kids, parents, and teachers, and reflected on the rhythms of history, Howe and Strauss explain how Millennials have turned out to be so dramatically different from Xers and boomers. Millennials Rising provides a fascinating narrative of America's next great generation.

Millennials Rising

The Next Great Generation
Author: Neil Howe,William Strauss
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0375707190
Category: Political Science
Page: 415
View: 1763

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Offers an analysis of young people born after 1982, explaining how they differ from their Baby Boomer and generation X parents, their characteristic behavior and attitudes, and prospects for their future.

Millennials Rising

The Next Great Generation
Author: Neil Howe,William Strauss
Publisher: Turtleback Books
ISBN: 9781417709243
Category: Political Science
Page: 415
View: 5173

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Offers an analysis of young people born after 1982, explaining how they differ from their Baby Boomer and generation X parents, their characteristic behavior and attitudes, and prospects for their future.

13th Gen

Abort, Retry, Ignore, Fail?
Author: William Strauss
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9780679743651
Category: Social Science
Page: 229
View: 9172

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A collection of commentaries, quotations, computer dumps, and cartoons explores the post-baby-boom generation's growing influence on American culture

Millennials Go to College


Author: Neil Howe,William Strauss
Publisher: Paramount Market Pub
ISBN: 9780971260610
Category: Education
Page: 228
View: 3398

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If you deal with today's students as a marketer, college faculty member, administrator, parent, or high school counselor, this hands-on guide is a necessary addition to your bookshelf. The new, updated edition features the latest data on the Millennial Generation and how they are changing--and will continue to change--college life. Just as profoundly as their Boomer and Gen-X parents did, college students and their younger siblings have different expectations for their college experience. The ways that they involve their parents in their lives are very different than the relationship between Boomers and their parents. A new chapter in this second edition addresses the shift from Boomer to Gen-X parents of college students, the next big transition on the doorstep of higher education. The authors address issues ranging from the rise of ratings-driven admissions, to the rising burden of student loans, to greater challenges facing career counselors, to the new transition from Boomer "helicopter" parents to Gen-X "stealth fighter" parents. The new edition also presents original survey results on college students and the parents of college students. This exciting new feature is sponsored by Datatel Corporation and Chartwells, and was carried out by Crux Research in collaboration with LifeCourse Associates. With this book, you will find out why Millennial college students: * Like to work in teams * Are risking less and planning more * Find money and class to be more divisive than race Learn how this generation of college students is different and what changes you must make in your approach to recruit them and market to them successfully.

Generations

The History of America's Future, 1584 to 2069
Author: Neil Howe,William Strauss
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0688119123
Category: History
Page: 544
View: 5048

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Hailed by national leaders as politically diverse as former Vice President Al Gore and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Generations has been heralded by reviewers as a brilliant, if somewhat unsettling, reassessment of where America is heading. William Strauss and Neil Howe posit the history of America as a succession of generational biographies, beginning in 1584 and encompassing every-one through the children of today. Their bold theory is that each generation belongs to one of four types, and that these types repeat sequentially in a fixed pattern. The vision of Generations allows us to plot a recurring cycle in American history -- a cycle of spiritual awakenings and secular crises -- from the founding colonists through the present day and well into this millenium. Generations is at once a refreshing historical narrative and a thrilling intuitive leap that reorders not only our history books but also our expectations for the twenty-first century.

Generation We

How Millennial Youth Are Taking Over America and Changing Our World Forever
Author: Eric H. Greenberg,Karl Weber
Publisher: Pachatusan
ISBN: 0982093101
Category: Political Science
Page: 247
View: 4556

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Looks at the attitudes and the emerging power of the Millennial Generation in the United States.

The Fourth Turning

What the Cycles of History Tell Us About America's Next Rendezvous with Destiny
Author: William Strauss,Neil Howe
Publisher: Three Rivers Press
ISBN: 9780307485052
Category: Social Science
Page: 400
View: 1939

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This astonishing book will change the way you see the world -- and your place in it. With startling originality, The Fourth Turning illuminates the past, explains the present, and reimagines the future. Most remarkably, it offers an utterly persuasive prophecy about a new American era that will begin just after the millennium. William Strauss and Neil Howe base this vision on a provocative new theory of American history. The authors look back five hundred years and uncover a distinct pattern: Modern history moves in cycles, each one lasting about the length of a long human life, each composed of four eras--or "turnings"--that last about twenty years and that always arrive in the same order. First comes a High, a period of confident expansion as a new order takes root after the old has been swept away. Next comes an Awakening, a time of spiritual exploration and rebellion against the now-established order. Then comes an Unraveling, an increasingly troubled era in which individualism triumphs over crumbling institutions. Last comes a Crisis--the Fourth Turning--when society passes through a great and perilous gate in history. Together, the four turnings comprise history's seasonal rhythm of growth, maturation, entropy, and rebirth. Strauss and Howe locate today's America as midway through an Unraveling, roughly a decade away from the next era of Crisis. In a brilliant analysis of the post-World War II period, they show how generational dynamics are the key to understanding the cycles of American history. They draw vivid portraits of all the modern generations: the can-do G.I.s, the mediating Silent, the values-absorbed Boomers, the pragmatic 13ers, and the child Millennials. Placed in the context of history's long rhythms, the persona and role of each generation become clear--as does the inevitability of the coming Crisis. Whatever your stage of life, The Fourth Turning offers bold predictions about how all of us can prepare, individually and collectively, for America's next rendezvous with destiny.

Millennials and the Pop Culture

Strategies for a New Generation of Consumers in Music, Movies, Television, the Internet, and Video Games
Author: William Strauss,Neil Howe
Publisher: Lifecourse Associates
ISBN: 9780971260603
Category: Conflict of generations
Page: 247
View: 6958

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Millennial Momentum

How a New Generation is Remaking America
Author: Morley Winograd,Michael D. Hais
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813551501
Category: Political Science
Page: 327
View: 545

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Argues that the new generation of youth, the Millennials, are transforming areas of American politics and culture, including education, entertainment, labor, and business, and explains how this shift will affect America's international relations.

Generation Me - Revised and Updated

Why Today's Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled--and More Miserable Than Ever Before
Author: Jean M. Twenge
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1476755566
Category: Social Science
Page: 400
View: 1472

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Draws on more than a decade of research to identify the challenges being faced by today's young adults, offering insight into how unprecedented levels of competitiveness, economic imbalances, and changes in sexual dynamics are resulting in higher incidences of life dissatisfaction and psychological turmoil. 40,000 first printing.

Marketing to Millennials

Reach the Largest and Most Influential Generation of Consumers Ever
Author: Jeff Fromm,Christie Garton
Publisher: AMACOM
ISBN: 0814433235
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 224
View: 2156

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The numbers cannot be ignored: eighty million Millennials wielding $200 billion in buying power are entering their peak earning and spending years. Companies that think winning their business is a simple matter of creating a Twitter account and applying outdated notions of "cool" to their advertising are due for a rude awakening. Marketing to Millennials is both an enlightening look at this generation of consumers and a practical plan for earning their trust and loyalty. Based on original market research, the book reveals the eight attitudes shared by most Millennials, as well as the new rules for engaging them successfully. Millennials: * Value social networking and aren't shy about sharing opinions * Refuse to remain passive consumers-they expect to participate in product development and marketing * Demand authenticity and transparency * Are highly influential-swaying parents and peers * Are not all alike-understanding key segments is invaluable Featuring expert interviews and profiles of brands doing Millennial marketing right, this eye-opening book is the key to persuading the customers who will determine the bottom line for decades to come.

The Trophy Kids Grow Up

How the Millennial Generation is Shaking Up the Workplace
Author: Ron Alsop
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780470447284
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 272
View: 9587

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The first wave of the Millennial Generation—born between 1980 and 2001—is entering the work force, and employers are facing some of the biggest management challenges they’ve ever encountered. They are trying to integrate the most demanding and most coddled generation in history into a workplace shaped by the driven baby-boom generation. Like them or not, the millennials are America future work force. They are actually a larger group than the boomers—92 million vs. 78 million. The millennials are truly trophy kids, the pride and joy of their parents who remain closely connected even as their children head off to college and enter the work force. Millennials are a complex generation, with some conflicting characteristics. Although they’re hard working and achievement oriented, most millennials don’t excel at leadership and independent problem solving. They want the freedom and flexibility of a virtual office, but they also want rules and responsibilities to be spelled out explicitly. “It’s all about me,” might seem to be the mantra of this demanding bunch of young people, yet they also tend to be very civic-minded and philanthropic. This book will let readers meet the millennials and learn how this remarkable generation promises to stir up the workplace and perhaps the world. It provides a rich portrait of the millennials, told through the eyes of millennials themselves and from the perspectives of their parents, educators, psychologists, recruiters, and corporate managers. Clearly, the millennials represent a new breed of student, worker, and global citizen, and this book explores in depth their most salient attributes, particularly as they are playing out in the workplace. It also describes how companies are changing tactics to recruit millennials in the Internet age and looks at some of this generation’s dream jobs.

The Next America

Boomers, Millennials, and the Looming Generational Showdown
Author: Paul Taylor,Pew Research Center
Publisher: PublicAffairs
ISBN: 1610396685
Category: Social Science
Page: 384
View: 8481

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The America of the near future will look nothing like the America of the recent past. America is in the throes of a demographic overhaul. Huge generation gaps have opened up in our political and social values, our economic well-being, our family structure, our racial and ethnic identity, our gender norms, our religious affiliation, and our technology use. Today’s Millennials—well-educated, tech savvy, underemployed twenty-somethings—are at risk of becoming the first generation in American history to have a lower standard of living than their parents. Meantime, more than 10,000 Baby Boomers are retiring every single day, most of them not as well prepared financially as they’d hoped. This graying of our population has helped polarize our politics, put stresses on our social safety net, and presented our elected leaders with a daunting challenge: How to keep faith with the old without bankrupting the young and starving the future. Every aspect of our demography is being fundamentally transformed. By mid-century, the population of the United States will be majority non-white and our median age will edge above 40—both unprecedented milestones. But other rapidly-aging economic powers like China, Germany, and Japan will have populations that are much older. With our heavy immigration flows, the US is poised to remain relatively young. If we can get our spending priorities and generational equities in order, we can keep our economy second to none. But doing so means we have to rebalance the social compact that binds young and old. In tomorrow’s world, yesterday’s math will not add up. Drawing on Pew Research Center’s extensive archive of public opinion surveys and demographic data, The Next America is a rich portrait of where we are as a nation and where we’re headed—toward a future marked by the most striking social, racial, and economic shifts the country has seen in a century.

Kids These Days

Human Capital and the Making of Millennials
Author: Malcolm Harris
Publisher: Little, Brown
ISBN: 0316510874
Category: Social Science
Page: 8
View: 5467

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"The first major accounting of the millennial generation written by someone who belongs to it." -- Jia Tolentino, The New Yorker "The best, most comprehensive work of social and economic analysis about our benighted generation." --Tony Tulathimutte, author of Private Citizens "The kind of brilliantly simple idea that instantly clarifies an entire area of culture."--William Deresiewicz, author of Excellent Sheep Millennials have been stereotyped as lazy, entitled, narcissistic, and immature. We've gotten so used to sloppy generational analysis filled with dumb clichés about young people that we've lost sight of what really unites Millennials. Namely: !--[if !supportLists]--- We are the most educated and hard-working generation in American history. !--[if !supportLists]--- We poured historic and insane amounts of time and money into preparing ourselves for the 21st century labor market. - We have been taught to consider working for free (homework, internships) a privilege for our own benefit. - We are poorer, more medicated, and more precariously employed than our parents, grandparents, even our great grandparents, with less of a social safety net to boot. Kids These Days, is about why. In brilliant, crackling prose, early Wall Street occupier Malcolm Harris gets mercilessly real about our maligned birth cohort. Examining trends like runaway student debt, the rise of the intern, mass incarceration, social media, and more, Harris gives us a portrait of what it means to be young in America today that will wake you up and piss you off. Millennials were the first generation raised explicitly as investments, Harris argues, and in Kids These Days he dares us to confront and take charge of the consequences now that we are grown up.

Generation Blend

Managing Across the Technology Age Gap
Author: R. Salkowitz
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780470285763
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 208
View: 7208

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If you want to engage, motivate, and retain young workers without driving the veteran workers away, Generation Blend can help you. This timely book explores how generational attitudes toward technology affect issues as diverse as recruitment and retention, employee training, management decision-making, collaboration, knowledge sharing, and work/life balance. Looking to solve the puzzle of productivity across the technology age gap? Start with Generation Blend.

The Myth of Endless Growth

Exposing Capitalism's Insustainability
Author: William Strauss
Publisher: Lulu.com
ISBN: 0557624967
Category:
Page: 369
View: 1345

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This book shows how mainstream economic theory is fundamentally flawed. It shows how the expectation for endless growth is so deeply ingrained into what we expect the future to be that we do not even question the assumption. But this work, rather than follow an ecological path to explore limits to growth, is an "inside job" that shows that when modern economic growth theories are decoupled from assumptions that have no basis in how the real world is developing, but are, for the most part, mathematical conveniences applied for the sake of "stability," then the long-run economic outcome is no longer capitalism. Decision makers assume that changes today will lead to predictable and/or reversible outcomes. This is a myth. There are fallacies throughout the assumptions of predictability, reversibility, and endless growth. When reasoning is based upon a flawed foundation, bad choices can appear reasonable. This work shows that the future is not what it is supposed to be.

The Dumbest Generation

How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future(Or, Don 't Trust Anyone Under 30)
Author: Mark Bauerlein
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1440636893
Category: Social Science
Page: 272
View: 5075

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This shocking, surprisingly entertaining romp into the intellectual nether regions of today's underthirty set reveals the disturbing and, ultimately, incontrovertible truth: cyberculture is turning us into a society of know-nothings. The Dumbest Generation is a dire report on the intellectual life of young adults and a timely warning of its impact on American democracy and culture. For decades, concern has been brewing about the dumbed-down popular culture available to young people and the impact it has on their futures. But at the dawn of the digital age, many thought they saw an answer: the internet, email, blogs, and interactive and hyper-realistic video games promised to yield a generation of sharper, more aware, and intellectually sophisticated children. The terms “information superhighway” and “knowledge economy” entered the lexicon, and we assumed that teens would use their knowledge and understanding of technology to set themselves apart as the vanguards of this new digital era. That was the promise. But the enlightenment didn’t happen. The technology that was supposed to make young adults more aware, diversify their tastes, and improve their verbal skills has had the opposite effect. According to recent reports from the National Endowment for the Arts, most young people in the United States do not read literature, visit museums, or vote. They cannot explain basic scientific methods, recount basic American history, name their local political representatives, or locate Iraq or Israel on a map. The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future is a startling examination of the intellectual life of young adults and a timely warning of its impact on American culture and democracy. Over the last few decades, how we view adolescence itself has changed, growing from a pitstop on the road to adulthood to its own space in society, wholly separate from adult life. This change in adolescent culture has gone hand in hand with an insidious infantilization of our culture at large; as adolescents continue to disengage from the adult world, they have built their own, acquiring more spending money, steering classrooms and culture towards their own needs and interests, and now using the technology once promoted as the greatest hope for their futures to indulge in diversions, from MySpace to multiplayer video games, 24/7. Can a nation continue to enjoy political and economic predominance if its citizens refuse to grow up? Drawing upon exhaustive research, personal anecdotes, and historical and social analysis, The Dumbest Generation presents a portrait of the young American mind at this critical juncture, and lays out a compelling vision of how we might address its deficiencies. The Dumbest Generation pulls no punches as it reveals the true cost of the digital age—and our last chance to fix it.