Men, Women, and Chain Saws

Gender in the Modern Horror Film
Author: Carol J. Clover
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691006208
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 260
View: 1224

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Female-hero films like Silence of the Lambs and Thelma and Louise may be breakthroughs from the point of view of mainstream Hollywood cinema, but their themes have a long ancestry in lowlife horror.

Men, Women, and Chain Saws

Gender in the Modern Horror Film
Author: Carol J. Clover
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400866111
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 280
View: 4465

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From its first publication in 1992, Men, Women, and Chain Saws has offered a groundbreaking perspective on the creativity and influence of horror cinema since the mid-1970s. Investigating the popularity of the low-budget tradition, Carol Clover looks in particular at slasher, occult, and rape-revenge films. Although such movies have been traditionally understood as offering only sadistic pleasures to their mostly male audiences, Clover demonstrates that they align spectators not with the male tormentor, but with the females tormented—notably the slasher movie's "final girls"—as they endure fear and degradation before rising to save themselves. The lesson was not lost on the mainstream industry, which was soon turning out the formula in well-made thrillers. Including a new preface by the author, this Princeton Classics edition is a definitive work that has found an avid readership from students of film theory to major Hollywood filmmakers.

The modern horror film

50 contemporary classics from "The curse of Frankenstein" to "The Lair of the White worm"
Author: John McCarty
Publisher: Citadel Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 244
View: 7002

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Provides credits, cast list, background, plot summaries, and an evaluation of fifty horror movies made from 1957 to 1988

The Dread of Difference

Gender and the Horror Film
Author: Barry Keith Grant
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 1477302425
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 560
View: 7123

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"The Dread of Difference is a classic. Few film studies texts have been so widely read and so influential. It's rarely on the shelf at my university library, so continuously does it circulate. Now this new edition expands the already comprehensive coverage of gender in the horror film with new essays on recent developments such as the Hostel series and torture porn. Informative and enlightening, this updated classic is an essential reference for fans and students of horror movies."—Stephen Prince, editor of The Horror Film and author of Digital Visual Effects in Cinema: The Seduction of Reality "An impressive array of distinguished scholars . . . gazes deeply into the darkness and then forms a Dionysian chorus reaffirming that sexuality and the monstrous are indeed mated in many horror films."—Choice "An extremely useful introduction to recent thinking about gender issues within this genre."—Film Theory

House of Psychotic Women

An Autobiographical Topography of Female Neurosis in Horror and Exploitation Films
Author: Kier-La Janisse
Publisher: SCB Distributors
ISBN: 1903254825
Category: Horror films
Page: 357
View: 468

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"House of Psychotic Women is an autobiographical exploration of female neurosis in horror and exploitation films. Anecdotes and memories interweave with film history, criticism, trivia and confrontational imagery to create a reflective personal history and examination of female madness, both onscreen and off."--Publisher description.

Reel Terror

The Scary, Bloody, Gory, Hundred-Year History of Classic Horror Films
Author: David Konow
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin
ISBN: 1250013593
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 608
View: 1781

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From the author of the definitive heavy metal history, Bang Your Head, a behind-the-scenes look a century of horror films Reel Terror is a love letter to the wildly popular yet still misunderstood genre that churns out blockbusters and cult classics year after year. From The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari to Paranormal Activity, Konow explores its all-time highs and lows, why the genre has been overlooked, and how horror films just might help us overcome fear. His on-set stories and insights delve into each movie and its effect on American culture. For novices to all out film buffs, this is the perfection companion to this Halloween's movie marathons.

Recreational Terror

Women and the Pleasures of Horror Film Viewing
Author: Isabel Cristina Pinedo
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438416164
Category: Social Science
Page: 177
View: 9559

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Challenges the conventional wisdom that violent horror films can only degrade women and incite violence.

Euro Horror

Classic European Horror Cinema in Contemporary American Culture
Author: Ian Olney
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253006481
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 257
View: 6652

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Beginning in the 1950s, "Euro Horror" movies materialized in astonishing numbers from Italy, Spain, and France and popped up in the US at rural drive-ins and urban grindhouse theaters such as those that once dotted New York's Times Square. Gorier, sexier, and stranger than most American horror films of the time, they were embraced by hardcore fans and denounced by critics as the worst kind of cinematic trash. In this volume, Olney explores some of the most popular genres of Euro Horror cinema—including giallo films, named for the yellow covers of Italian pulp fiction, the S&M horror film, and cannibal and zombie films—and develops a theory that explains their renewed appeal to audiences today.

Horror Noire

Blacks in American Horror Films from the 1890s to Present
Author: Robin R Means Coleman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136942947
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 296
View: 8850

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From King Kong to Candyman, the boundary-pushing genre of the horror film has always been a site for provocative explorations of race in American popular culture. In Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from 1890's to Present, Robin R. Means Coleman traces the history of notable characterizations of blackness in horror cinema, and examines key levels of black participation on screen and behind the camera. She argues that horror offers a representational space for black people to challenge the more negative, or racist, images seen in other media outlets, and to portray greater diversity within the concept of blackness itself. Horror Noire presents a unique social history of blacks in America through changing images in horror films. Throughout the text, the reader is encouraged to unpack the genre’s racialized imagery, as well as the narratives that make up popular culture’s commentary on race. Offering a comprehensive chronological survey of the genre, this book addresses a full range of black horror films, including mainstream Hollywood fare, as well as art-house films, Blaxploitation films, direct-to-DVD films, and the emerging U.S./hip-hop culture-inspired Nigerian "Nollywood" Black horror films. Horror Noire is, thus, essential reading for anyone seeking to understand how fears and anxieties about race and race relations are made manifest, and often challenged, on the silver screen.

Nightmare Movies

Horror on Screen Since the 1960s
Author: Kim Newman
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1408817500
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 640
View: 3588

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Now over twenty years old, the original edition of Nightmare Movies has retained its place as a true classic of cult film criticism. In this new edition, Kim Newman brings his seminal work completely up-to-date, both reassessing his earlier evaluations and adding a second part that assess the last two decades of horror films with all the wit, intelligence and insight for which he is known. Since the publication of the first edition, horror has been on a gradual upswing, and taken a new and stronger hold over the film industry. Newman negotiates his way through a vast back-catalogue of horror, charting the on-screen progress of our collective fears and bogeymen from the low budget slasher movies of the 60s, through to the slick releases of the 2000s, in a critical appraisal that doubles up as a genealogical study of contemporary horror and its forebears. Newman invokes the figures that fuel the ongoing demand for horror - the serial killer; the vampire; the werewolf; the zombie - and draws on his remarkable knowledge of the genre to give us a comprehensive overview of the modern myths that have shaped the imagination of multiple generations of cinema-goers. Nightmare Movies is an invaluable companion that not only provides a newly updated history of the darker side of film but a truly entertaining guide with which to discover the less well-trodden paths of horror, and re-discover the classics with a newly instructed eye.

Skin Shows

Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters
Author: Judith Halberstam
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822316633
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 215
View: 7741

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In this examination of the monster as cultural object, Judith Halberstam offers a rereading of the monstrous that revises our view of the Gothic. Moving from the nineteenth century and the works of Shelley, Stevenson, Stoker, and Wilde to contemporary horror film exemplified by such movies as Silence of the Lambs, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and Candyman, Skin Shows understands the Gothic as a versatile technology, a means of producing monsters that is constantly being rewritten by historically and culturally conditioned fears generated by a shared sense of otherness and difference. Deploying feminist and queer approaches to the monstrous body, Halberstam views the Gothic as a broad-based cultural phenomenon that supports and sustains the economic, social, and sexual hierarchies of the time. She resists familiar psychoanalytic critiques and cautions against any interpretive attempt to reduce the affective power of the monstrous to a single factor. The nineteenth-century monster is shown, for example, as configuring otherness as an amalgam of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Invoking Foucault, Halberstam describes the history of monsters in terms of its shifting relation to the body and its representations. As a result, her readings of familiar texts are radically new. She locates psychoanalysis itself within the gothic tradition and sees sexuality as a beast created in nineteenth century literature. Excessive interpretability, Halberstam argues, whether in film, literature, or in the culture at large, is the actual hallmark of monstrosity.

How to Survive a Horror Movie

All the Skills to Dodge the Kills
Author: Seth Grahame-Smith
Publisher: Quirk Books
ISBN: 9781594741791
Category: Humor
Page: 175
View: 3977

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Teaches readers how to cope with every kind of horror movie obstacle, from ax-wielding psychopaths to haunted Japanese VHS tapes, and is full of illustrated instructions on avoiding ghosts, serial killers, haunted cars, murderous pets, telekinetic prom queens, and countless other hazards. Original.

A Companion to the Horror Film


Author: Harry M. Benshoff
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119335019
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 608
View: 4604

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"Offers a critical survey of the art and practice of horror movies covering everything from craft and technique, historical developments, and modern-day trends, to broader topics opening onto the socio-political dimensions of the genre. The volume begins with essays devoted to the theoretical methodologies used to study the genre, from cognitive and philosophical approaches, through audience reception and psychoanalysis, to those approaches that examine gender, sexuality, race, class, and (dis) ability in relation to the horror film. Subsequent sections cover horror film aesthetics, the history of the genre, and specific subjects including distribution and the relationship between horror, art house movies, and the documentary impulse."--Provided by publisher.

The Horror Film


Author: Peter Hutchings
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317874099
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 256
View: 350

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The Horror Film is an in-depth exploration of one of the most consistently popular, but also most disreputable, of all the mainstream film genres. Since the early 1930s there has never been a time when horror films were not being produced in substantial numbers somewhere in the world and never a time when they were not being criticised, censored or banned. The Horror Film engages with the key issues raised by this most contentious of genres. It considers the reasons for horror's disreputability and seeks to explain why despite this horror has been so successful. Where precisely does the appeal of horror lie? An extended introductory chapter identifies what it is about horror that makes the genre so difficult to define. The chapter then maps out the historical development of the horror genre, paying particular attention to the international breadth and variety of horror production, with reference to films made in the United States, Britain, Italy, Spain and elsewhere. Subsequent chapters explore: The role of monsters, focusing on the vampire and the serial killer. The usefulness (and limitations) of psychological approaches to horror. The horror audience: what kind of people like horror (and what do other people think of them)? Gender, race and class in horror: how do horror films such as Bride of Frankenstein, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and Blade relate to the social and political realities within which they are produced? Sound and horror: in what ways has sound contributed to the development of horror? Performance in horror: how have performers conveyed fear and terror throughout horror's history? 1970s horror: was this the golden age of horror production? Slashers and post-slashers: from Halloween to Scream and beyond. The Horror Film throws new light on some well-known horror films but also introduces the reader to examples of noteworthy but more obscure horror work. A final section provides a guide to further reading and an extensive bibliography. Accessibly written, The Horror Film is a lively and informative account of the genre that will appeal to students of cinema, film teachers and researchers, and horror lovers everywhere.

Rape-Revenge Films

A Critical Study
Author: Alexandra Heller-Nicholas
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786486929
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 238
View: 5109

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Often considered the lowest depth to which the cinema can plummet, the rape-revenge film has been dismissed as exploitative and sensational, catering to a demented demographic. Only on such rare occasions as Ingmar Bergman’s The Virgin Spring, John Boorman’s Deliverance and Quentin Tarantino’s Death Proof has the rape-revenge movie transcended what is commonly assumed to be its intrinsically exploitative nature and moved into the mainstream. This critical overview reassesses that viewpoint by exploring a variety of themes, as well as the elements that this type of film has in common. The author discusses an array of films directed by noteworthy directors from several countries, demonstrating that diverse and often contradictory treatments of sexual violence can exist simultaneously.

The New Avengers

Feminism, Feminity and the Rape-Revenge Cycle
Author: Jacinda Read
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 9780719059056
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 290
View: 955

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In this, the first full-length study of the rape-revenge film, Jacinda Read suggests that the rape-revenge cycle can be read as one of the primary ways in which Hollywood has attempted to make sense of feminism and the changing shape of heterosexual femininity in the post-1970 period. Arguing that rape-revenge is better understood not as a genre, but as a narrative structure, the author analyzes the ways that various deployments of this structure rework the "mass cultural fictions of femininity" inscribed in the genres over which they have been mapped.

Girlhood and the Plastic Image


Author: Heather Warren-Crow
Publisher: Dartmouth College Press
ISBN: 1611685753
Category: Art
Page: 234
View: 9748

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You are girlish, our images tell us. You are plastic. Girlhood and the Plastic Image explains how, revealing the increasing girlishness of contemporary media. The figure of the girl has long been prized for its mutability, for the assumed instability and flexibility of the not-yet-woman. The plasticity of girlish identity has met its match in the plastic world of digital art and cinema. A richly satisfying interdisciplinary study showing girlish transformation to be a widespread condition of mediation, Girlhood and the Plastic Image explores how and why our images promise us the adaptability of youth. This original and engaging study will appeal to a broad interdisciplinary audience including scholars of media studies, film studies, art history, and women's studies.

Monsters in the Closet

Homosexuality and the Horror Film
Author: Harry M. Benshoff
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 9780719044731
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 328
View: 8861

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Monster in the Closet is a history of the horrors film that explores the genre's relationship to the social and cultural history of homosexuality in America. Drawing on a wide variety of films and primary source materials including censorship files, critical reviews, promotional materials, fanzines, men's magazines, and popular news weeklies, the book examines the historical figure of the movie monster in relation to various medical, psychological, religious and social models of homosexuality. While recent work within gay and lesbian studies has explored how the genetic tropes of the horror film intersect with popular culture's understanding of queerness, this is the first book to examine how the concept of the monster queer has evolved from era to era. From the gay and lesbian sensibilities encoded into the form and content of the classical Hollywood horror film, to recent films which play upon AIDS-related fears. Monster in the Closet examines how the horror film started and continues, to demonize (or quite literally "monsterize") queer sexuality, and what the pleasures and "costs" of such representations might be both for individual spectators and culture at large.

The Monstrous-Feminine

Film, Feminism, Psychoanalysis
Author: Barbara Creed
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136750754
Category: Social Science
Page: 216
View: 661

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In almost all critical writings on the horror film, woman is conceptualised only as victim. In The Monstrous-Feminine Barbara Creed challenges this patriarchal view by arguing that the prototype of all definitions of the monstrous is the female reproductive body. With close reference to a number of classic horror films including the Alien trilogy, The Exorcist and Psycho, Creed analyses the seven `faces' of the monstrous-feminine: archaic mother, monstrous womb, vampire, witch, possessed body, monstrous mother and castrator. Her argument that man fears woman as castrator, rather than as castrated, questions not only Freudian theories of sexual difference but existing theories of spectatorship and fetishism, providing a provocative re-reading of classical and contemporary film and theoretical texts.