Men, Women, and Chain Saws

Gender in the Modern Horror Film
Author: Carol J. Clover
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400866111
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 280
View: 3869

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From its first publication in 1992, Men, Women, and Chain Saws has offered a groundbreaking perspective on the creativity and influence of horror cinema since the mid-1970s. Investigating the popularity of the low-budget tradition, Carol Clover looks in particular at slasher, occult, and rape-revenge films. Although such movies have been traditionally understood as offering only sadistic pleasures to their mostly male audiences, Clover demonstrates that they align spectators not with the male tormentor, but with the females tormented—notably the slasher movie's "final girls"—as they endure fear and degradation before rising to save themselves. The lesson was not lost on the mainstream industry, which was soon turning out the formula in well-made thrillers. Including a new preface by the author, this Princeton Classics edition is a definitive work that has found an avid readership from students of film theory to major Hollywood filmmakers.

Horror Noire

Blacks in American Horror Films from the 1890s to Present
Author: Robin R Means Coleman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136942939
Category: Social Science
Page: 296
View: 6509

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From King Kong to Candyman, the boundary-pushing genre of the horror film has always been a site for provocative explorations of race in American popular culture. In Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from 1890's to Present, Robin R. Means Coleman traces the history of notable characterizations of blackness in horror cinema, and examines key levels of black participation on screen and behind the camera. She argues that horror offers a representational space for black people to challenge the more negative, or racist, images seen in other media outlets, and to portray greater diversity within the concept of blackness itself. Horror Noire presents a unique social history of blacks in America through changing images in horror films. Throughout the text, the reader is encouraged to unpack the genre’s racialized imagery, as well as the narratives that make up popular culture’s commentary on race. Offering a comprehensive chronological survey of the genre, this book addresses a full range of black horror films, including mainstream Hollywood fare, as well as art-house films, Blaxploitation films, direct-to-DVD films, and the emerging U.S./hip-hop culture-inspired Nigerian "Nollywood" Black horror films. Horror Noire is, thus, essential reading for anyone seeking to understand how fears and anxieties about race and race relations are made manifest, and often challenged, on the silver screen.

New American Teenagers

The Lost Generation of Youth in 1970s Film
Author: Barbara Jane Brickman
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1441176772
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 280
View: 7159

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Taking a closer look at teen film in the 1970s, New American Teenagers uncovers previously marginalized voices that rework the classically male, heterosexual American teenage story. While their parents' era defined the American teenager with the romantic male figure of James Dean, this generation of adolescents offers a dramatically altered picture of transformed gender dynamics, fluid and queered sexuality, and a chilling disregard for the authority of parent, or more specifically, patriarchal culture. Films like The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Halloween, and Badlands offer a reprieve from the 'straight' developmental narrative, including in the canon of study the changing definition of the American teenager. Barbara Brickman is the first to challenge the neglect of this decade in discussions of teen film by establishing the subversive potential and critical revision possible in the narratives of these new teenage voices, particularly in regards to changing notions of gender and sexuality.

Bakchen


Author: Euripides,Friedrich Gotthold Schöne
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: 120
View: 4522

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Hideous Progeny

Disability, Eugenics, and Classic Horror Cinema
Author: Angela Smith
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231527853
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 384
View: 5857

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Twisted bodies, deformed faces, aberrant behavior, and abnormal desires characterized the hideous creatures of classic Hollywood horror, which thrilled audiences with their sheer grotesqueness. Most critics have interpreted these traits as symptoms of sexual repression or as metaphors for other kinds of marginalized identities, yet Angela M. Smith conducts a richer investigation into the period's social and cultural preoccupations. She finds instead a fascination with eugenics and physical and cognitive debility in the narrative and spectacle of classic 1930s horror, heightened by the viewer's desire for visions of vulnerability and transformation. Reading such films as Dracula (1931), Frankenstein (1931), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), Freaks (1932), and Mad Love (1935) against early-twentieth-century disability discourse and propaganda on racial and biological purity, Smith showcases classic horror's dependence on the narratives of eugenics and physiognomics. She also notes the genre's conflicted and often contradictory visualizations. Smith ultimately locates an indictment of biological determinism in filmmakers' visceral treatments, which take the impossibility of racial improvement and bodily perfection to sensationalistic heights. Playing up the artifice and conventions of disabled monsters, filmmakers exploited the fears and yearnings of their audience, accentuating both the perversity of the medical and scientific gaze and the debilitating experience of watching horror. Classic horror films therefore encourage empathy with the disabled monster, offering captive viewers an unsettling encounter with their own impairment. Smith's work profoundly advances cinema and disability studies, in addition to general histories concerning the construction of social and political attitudes toward the Other.

Horror zone

the cultural experience of contemporary horror cinema
Author: Ian Conrich
Publisher: I B Tauris & Co Ltd
ISBN: 9781848852624
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 306
View: 2535

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In his landmark Introduction to the American Horror Film, Robin Wood noted that horror "has consistently been one of the most popular and, at the same time, the most disreputable of Hollywood genres." Horror is still immensely popular but its assimilation into our culture continues apace. In Horror Zone, leading international writers on horror take horror out into the world beyond cinema screens to explore the interconnections between the films and modern media and entertainment industries, economies and production practices, cultural and political forums, spectators and fans. They critically examine the ways in which the horror genre functions in all its multifarious forms, for example the Friday the 13th films as modern grand guignol, the relationship between the contemporary horror film and the theme park ride, horror as art house cinema, connections between pornography and the horror film and the place of special effects in this most respectable of Hollywood genres.

The Dread of Difference

Gender and the Horror Film
Author: Barry Keith Grant
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 1477302425
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 560
View: 9920

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"The Dread of Difference is a classic. Few film studies texts have been so widely read and so influential. It's rarely on the shelf at my university library, so continuously does it circulate. Now this new edition expands the already comprehensive coverage of gender in the horror film with new essays on recent developments such as the Hostel series and torture porn. Informative and enlightening, this updated classic is an essential reference for fans and students of horror movies."—Stephen Prince, editor of The Horror Film and author of Digital Visual Effects in Cinema: The Seduction of Reality "An impressive array of distinguished scholars . . . gazes deeply into the darkness and then forms a Dionysian chorus reaffirming that sexuality and the monstrous are indeed mated in many horror films."—Choice "An extremely useful introduction to recent thinking about gender issues within this genre."—Film Theory

Gründe der Liebe


Author: Harry G. Frankfurt
Publisher: Suhrkamp Verlag
ISBN: 3518737724
Category: Philosophy
Page: 111
View: 1568

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Für den Liebenden ist die Liebe eine Quelle von Gründen. Sie ist »auf berüchtigte Weise schwer zu erhellen«, darf aber, so Harry Frankfurt, nicht mit Vernarrtheit oder Lust, Besessenheit oder Abhängigkeit verwechselt werden, also mit dem, was eine Person glaubt oder fühlt. Liebe, so die Generalthese des Buches, ist vielmehr eine Sache des Willens, genauer: der praktischen Sorge um das, was für den, den man liebt, gut ist. Frankfurts scharfsinniges Buch schließt mit einer überraschenden Reflexion über die Selbstliebe, die er als die reinste Form der Liebe bezeichnet.

Cannibalism in Literature and Film


Author: J. Brown
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137292121
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 258
View: 958

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A comprehensive study of cannibalism in literature and film, spanning colonial fiction, Gothic texts and contemporary American horror. Amidst the sharp teeth and horrific appetite of the cannibal, this book examines real fears of over-consumerism and consumption that trouble an ever-growing modern world.

The Philosophy of Horror


Author: Thomas Fahy
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813139546
Category: Philosophy
Page: 272
View: 2109

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Sitting on pins and needles, anxiously waiting to see what will happen next, horror audiences crave the fear and exhilaration generated by a terrifying story; their anticipation is palpable. But they also breathe a sigh of relief when the action is over, when they are able to close their books or leave the movie theater. Whether serious, kitschy, frightening, or ridiculous, horror not only arouses the senses but also raises profound questions about fear, safety, justice, and suffering. From literature and urban legends to film and television, horror's ability to thrill has made it an integral part of modern entertainment. Thomas Fahy and twelve other scholars reveal the underlying themes of the genre in The Philosophy of Horror. Examining the evolving role of horror, the contributing authors investigate works such as Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), horror films of the 1930s, Stephen King's novels, Stanley Kubrick's adaptation of The Shining (1980), and Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960). Also examined are works that have largely been ignored in philosophical circles, including Truman Capote's In Cold Blood (1965), Patrick Süskind's Perfume (1985), and James Purdy's Narrow Rooms (2005). The analysis also extends to contemporary forms of popular horror and "torture-horror" films of the last decade, including Saw (2004), Hostel (2005), The Devil's Rejects (2005), and The Hills Have Eyes (2006), as well as the ongoing popularity of horror on the small screen. The Philosophy of Horror celebrates the strange, compelling, and disturbing elements of horror, drawing on interpretive approaches such as feminist, postcolonial, Marxist, and psychoanalytic criticism. The book invites readers to consider horror's various manifestations and transformations since the late 1700s, probing its social, cultural, and political functions in today's media-hungry society.

Spectral America

phantoms and the national imagination
Author: Jeffrey Andrew Weinstock
Publisher: Popular Press
ISBN: 9780299199500
Category: Fiction
Page: 282
View: 7283

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From essays about the Salem witch trials to literary uses of ghosts by Twain, Wharton, and Bierce to the cinematic blockbuster The Sixth Sense, this book is the first to survey the importance of ghosts and hauntings in American culture across time. From the Puritans’ conviction that a thousand preternatural beings appear every day before our eyes, to today’s resurgence of spirits in fiction and film, the culture of the United States has been obsessed with ghosts. In each generation, these phantoms in popular culture reflect human anxieties about religion, science, politics, and social issues. Spectral America asserts that ghosts, whether in oral tradition, literature, or such modern forms as cinema have always been constructions embedded in specific historical contexts and invoked for explicit purposes, often political in nature. The essays address the role of "spectral evidence" during the Salem witch trials, the Puritan belief in good spirits, the convergence of American Spiritualism and technological development in the nineteenth century, the use of the supernatural as a tool of political critique in twentieth-century magic realism, and the "ghosting" of persons living with AIDS. They also discuss ghostly themes in the work of Ambrose Bierce, Edith Wharton, Gloria Naylor, and Stephen King.

Boss Ladies, Watch Out!

Essays on Women, Sex, and Writing
Author: Terry Castle
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415938747
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 309
View: 6932

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In the second part of the book, Castle embraces, with gusto, the role of Female Critic herself." "In lively reconsiderations of Sappho, Bronte, Cather, Colette, Gertrude Stein, and many other great women writers - "Boss Ladies" all - Castle pays a moving and civilized tribute to female genius and intellectual daring."--BOOK JACKET.

The Cinema of Michael Haneke

Europe Utopia
Author: Ben McCann,David Sorfa
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231504659
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 256
View: 9168

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Michael Haneke is one of the most important directors working in Europe today, with films such as Funny Games (1997), Code Unknown (2000), and Hidden (2005) interrogating modern ethical dilemmas with forensic clarity and merciless insight. Haneke's films frequently implicate both the protagonists and the audience in the making of their misfortunes, yet even in the barren nihilism of The Seventh Continent (1989) and Time of the Wolf (2003) a dark strain of optimism emerges, releasing each from its terrible and inescapable guilt. It is this contingent and unlikely possibility that we find in Haneke's cinema: a utopian Europe. This collection celebrates, explicates, and sometimes challenges the worldview of Haneke's films. It examines the director's central themes and preoccupations—bourgeois alienation, modes and critiques of spectatorship, the role of the media—and analyzes otherwise marginalized aspects of his work, such as the function of performance and stardom, early Austrian television productions, the romanticism of The Piano Teacher (2001), and the 2007 shot-for-shot remake of Funny Games.

Tiny Surrealism

Salvador Dal and the Aesthetics of the Small
Author: Roger Rothman
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803236492
Category: Art
Page: 262
View: 2440

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"New light on both Dalí's well-known and little-studied works and his work as a response to modernism through a focus on Dalí's identification with the small and the marginal"--

European Nightmares

Horror Cinema in Europe Since 1945
Author: Patricia Allmer,David Huxley,Emily Brick
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231850085
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 288
View: 7967

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This volume is the first edited collection of essays focusing on European horror cinema from 1945 to the present. It features new contributions by distinguished international scholars exploring British, French, Spanish, Italian, German and Northern European and Eastern European horror cinema. The essays employ a variety of current critical methods of analysis, ranging from psychoanalysis and Deleuzean film theory to reception theory and historical analysis. The complete volume offers a major resource on post-war European horror cinema, with in-depth studies of such classic films as Seytan (Turkey, 1974), Suspiria (Italy, 1977), Switchblade Romance (France, 2003), and Taxidermia (Hungary, 2006).

Splatter Movies

Essays zum modernen Horrorfilm
Author: Julia Köhne,Ralph Kuschke,Arno Meteling
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Horror films
Page: 237
View: 3435

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Gender-Topographien.

Kulturwissenschaftliche Lektüren von Hollywoodfilmen der Jahrhundertwende.
Author: Claudia Liebrand
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Sex role in motion pictures
Page: 234
View: 8093

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The Walking Dead 4

Roman
Author: Robert Kirkman,Jay Bonansinga
Publisher: Heyne Verlag
ISBN: 3641144523
Category: Fiction
Page: 400
View: 3581

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Das Monster in uns Die Toten sind auferstanden und jagen die Lebenden, nichts und niemand ist vor ihnen sicher, und auf der ganzen Welt regiert das Chaos. Außer in dem kleinen Südstaatenstädtchen Woodbury: Dort regiert der Governor mit eiserner Hand über die wenigen Menschen, die die Apokalypse überlebt haben. Dafür bietet er ihnen Schutz vor den hungrigen Toten. Doch als die Menschen von Woodbury feststellen, dass das wahre Monster innerhalb der Stadtmauern wütet, kommt es zu einem blutigen Kampf – gegen die Lebenden und die Toten ...

Horror

Geschichte und Mythologie des Horrorfilms
Author: Georg Seesslen,Fernand Jung
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Horror films
Page: 1135
View: 4949

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