Mapping the Deep

The Extraordinary Story of Ocean Science
Author: Robert Kunzig
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393320633
Category: Nature
Page: 345
View: 8658

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An exploration of recent advances in what is known about the nature and effect of the sea.

The Restless Sea

Exploring the World Beneath the Waves
Author: Robert Kunzig
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393045628
Category: Nature
Page: 336
View: 4734

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A through exploration of recent advances in our knowledge about the nature and effect of the sea clearly demonstrates how little we really do know and how much more there is to be learned about the planet's last frontier

Ocean Worlds

The story of seas on Earth and other planets
Author: Jan Zalasiewicz,Mark Williams
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191653578
Category: Science
Page: 336
View: 1730

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Oceans make up most of the surface of our blue planet. They may form just a sliver on the outside of the Earth, but they are very important, not only in hosting life, including the fish and other animals on which many humans depend, but in terms of their role in the Earth system, in regulating climate, and cycling nutrients. As climate change, pollution, and over-exploitation by humans puts this precious resource at risk, it is more important than ever that we understand and appreciate the nature and history of oceans. There is much we still do not know about the story of the Earth's oceans, and we are only just beginning to find indications of oceans on other planets. In this book, geologists Jan Zalasiewicz and Mark Williams consider the deep history of oceans, how and when they may have formed on the young Earth — topics of intense current research — how they became salty, and how they evolved through Earth history. We learn how oceans have formed and disappeared over millions of years, how the sea nurtured life, and what may become of our oceans in the future. We encounter some of the scientists and adventurers whose efforts led to our present understanding of oceans. And we look at clues to possible seas that may once have covered parts of Mars and Venus, that may still exist, below the surface, on moons such as Europa and Callisto, and the possibility of watery planets in other star systems.

Soundings

The Story of the Remarkable Woman Who Mapped the Ocean Floor
Author: Hali Felt
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 1466847468
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 352
View: 9587

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Her maps of the ocean floor have been called "one of the most remarkable achievements in modern cartography", yet no one knows her name. Soundings is the story of the enigmatic, unknown woman behind one of the greatest achievements of the 20th century. Before Marie Tharp, geologist and gifted draftsperson, the whole world, including most of the scientific community, thought the ocean floor was a vast expanse of nothingness. In 1948, at age 28, Marie walked into the newly formed geophysical lab at Columbia University and practically demanded a job. The scientists at the lab were all male; the women who worked there were relegated to secretary or assistant. Through sheer willpower and obstinacy, Marie was given the job of interpreting the soundings (records of sonar pings measuring the ocean's depths) brought back from the ocean-going expeditions of her male colleagues. The marriage of artistry and science behind her analysis of this dry data gave birth to a major work: the first comprehensive map of the ocean floor, which laid the groundwork for proving the then-controversial theory of continental drift. When combined, Marie's scientific knowledge, her eye for detail and her skill as an artist revealed not a vast empty plane, but an entire world of mountains and volcanoes, ridges and rifts, and a gateway to the past that allowed scientists the means to imagine how the continents and the oceans had been created over time. Just as Marie dedicated more than twenty years of her professional life to what became the Lamont Geological Observatory, engaged in the task of mapping every ocean on Earth, she dedicated her personal life to her great friendship with her co-worker, Bruce Heezen. Partners in work and in many ways, partners in life, Marie and Bruce were devoted to one another as they rose to greater and greater prominence in the scientific community, only to be envied and finally dismissed by their beloved institute. They went on together, refining and perfecting their work and contributing not only to humanity's vision of the ocean floor, but to the way subsequent generations would view the Earth as a whole. With an imagination as intuitive as Marie's, brilliant young writer Hali Felt brings to vivid life the story of the pioneering scientist whose work became the basis for the work of others scientists for generations to come.

How the Ocean Works

An Introduction to Oceanography
Author: Mark Denny
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400842883
Category: Nature
Page: 344
View: 2713

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The world's oceans account for roughly 71 percent of the planet's surface and 99 percent of its livable volume. Any study of this huge habitat requires a solid foundation in the principles that underlie marine biology and physical and chemical oceanography, yet until now undergraduate textbooks have largely presented compilations of facts rather than explanations of principles. How the Ocean Works fills this gap, providing a concise and accessible college-level introduction to marine science that is also ideal for general readers. How are winds and currents driven? What is the dilemma of the two-layered ocean? Mark Denny explains key concepts like these in rich and fascinating detail. He explores early scientific knowledge of oceans, photosynthesis, trophic interactions and energy flow, and the impacts of human activities on marine and atmospheric systems. Focusing each chapter on a major topic and carefully explaining the principles and theory involved, Denny gives readers the conceptual building blocks needed to develop a coherent picture of the living ocean. How the Ocean Works is an indispensable resource that teaches readers how to think about the ocean--its biology, mechanics, and conservation. Provides a concise, up-to-date introduction to marine science Develops the conceptual basis needed to understand how the ocean works Explains fundamental principles and theory Includes color illustrations and informative diagrams Serves as a college textbook and a reference for general readers Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

Fixing Climate

The story of climate science - and how to stop global warming
Author: Wallace S. Broecker
Publisher: Profile Books
ISBN: 1847652522
Category: Science
Page: 288
View: 4044

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With Broeker as his guide, award-winning science writer Robert Kunzig looks back at Earth's volatile climate history so as to shed light on the challenges ahead. Ice ages, planetary orbits, a giant 'conveyor belt' in the ocean ... it's a riveting story full of maverick thinkers, extraordinary discoveries and an urgent blueprint for action. Likening climate to a slumbering beast, ready to react to the smallest of prods, Broecker shows how assiduously we've been prodding it, by pumping 70 million tonnes of CO2 into the air each year. Fixing Climate explains why we need not just to reduce emissions but to start removing our carbon waste from our atmosphere. And in a thrilling last section of the book, we learn how this could become reality, using 'artificial trees' and underground storage.

The Oceans

A Deep History
Author: Eelco J. Rohling
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400888662
Category: Science
Page: 272
View: 5725

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The 4.4-billion-year history of the oceans and their role in Earth's climate system It has often been said that we know more about the moon than we do about our own oceans. In fact, we know a great deal more about the oceans than many people realize. Scientists know that our actions today are shaping the oceans and climate of tomorrow—and that if we continue to act recklessly, the consequences will be dire. In this timely and accessible book, Eelco Rohling traces the 4.4 billion-year history of Earth’s oceans while also shedding light on the critical role they play in our planet’s climate system. Beginning with the formation of primeval Earth and the earliest appearance of oceans, Rohling takes readers on a journey through prehistory to the present age, vividly describing the major events in the ocean’s evolution—from snowball and greenhouse Earth to the end-Permian mass extinction, the breakup of the Pangaea supercontinent, and the changing climate of today. Along the way, he explores the close interrelationships of the oceans, climate, solid Earth processes, and life, using the context of Earth and ocean history to provide perspective on humankind’s impacts on the health and habitability of our planet—and on what the future may hold for us. An invaluable introduction to the cutting-edge science of paleoceanography, The Oceans enables you to make your own informed opinions about the environmental challenges we face as a result of humanity’s unrelenting drive to exploit the world ocean and its vital resources.

War of the Whales

A True Story
Author: Joshua Horwitz
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451645015
Category: History
Page: 448
View: 1166

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Documents the efforts of crusading lawyer Joel Renolds and marine biologist Ken Balcolm to expose a covert U.S. Navy sub detection system that caused whales to beach themselves, an effort that challenged Ken's loyalties and pitted them against powerful military adversaries.

Bayou Farewell

The Rich Life and Tragic Death of Louisiana's Cajun Coast
Author: Mike Tidwell
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307424928
Category: Travel
Page: 368
View: 6701

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The Cajun coast of Louisiana is home to a way of life as unique, complex, and beautiful as the terrain itself. As award-winning travel writer Mike Tidwell journeys through the bayou, he introduces us to the food and the language, the shrimp fisherman, the Houma Indians, and the rich cultural history that makes it unlike any other place in the world. But seeing the skeletons of oak trees killed by the salinity of the groundwater, and whole cemeteries sinking into swampland and out of sight, Tidwell also explains why each introduction may be a farewell—as the storied Louisiana coast steadily erodes into the Gulf of Mexico. Part travelogue, part environmental exposé, Bayou Farewell is the richly evocative chronicle of the author's travels through a world that is vanishing before our eyes. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Water Baby

The Story of Alvin
Author: Victoria A. Kaharl
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 356
View: 2243

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A scientific biography of the deep-diving submersible, Alvin, probes the deepest recesses of the sea where twelve foot tube worms frolic and plate-sized clams gather barnacles on the ocean floor

The Wave

In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks, and Giants of the Ocean
Author: Susan Casey
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 0767928857
Category: Nature
Page: 408
View: 3297

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Traces the recent discovery of physics-defying ocean waves at heights previously thought impossible, describing the efforts of the scientific community to understand the phenomenon, the pursuits of extreme surfers to ride these waves, and the destructivecapabilities of tsunamis.

International Law and the Genetic Resources of the Deep Sea


Author: David Kenneth Leary
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9047418786
Category: Law
Page: 320
View: 6050

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Deep-sea genetic resources and the interest of the biotechnology industry in their exploitation are emerging as a significant challenge for international oceans governance. This book is the first comprehensive examination of this issue and explores its relationship with marine scientific research and other activities in the deep sea. As well as a detailed survey of the state of industry interest in this new field of biotechnology it also sets out proposals for future sustainable management of these resources utilizing many existing international law and policy regimes.

Modern Marine Science

Exploring the Deep
Author: Lisa Yount
Publisher: Infobase Publishing
ISBN: 1604130660
Category: Marine sciences
Page: 225
View: 4118

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The deep sea takes up almost 70 percent of Earth's surface and more than 97 percent, by volume, of the part of the planet available to living things. And yet it was only in the 20th century that humans developed the technology to venture more than a few hundred feet down into this daunting world. In fact, today's deepwater marine science owes much of its existence to the U.S. Navy's ability to detect enemy submarines by sound during World War II. Modern Marine Science profiles 12 men and women who led the way into the oceans' deepest waters through research and new technologies. From Charles Darwin to Henry Stommel to Robert Ballard, this volume explores the lives and accomplishments of these scientific revolutionaries.

The Ocean of Life

The Fate of Man and the Sea
Author: Callum Roberts
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101583568
Category: Science
Page: 432
View: 6290

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A Silent Spring for oceans, written by "the Rachel Carson of the fish world" (The New York Times) Who can forget the sense of wonder with which they discovered the creatures of the deep? In this vibrant hymn to the sea, Callum Roberts—one of the world’s foremost conservation biologists—leads readers on a fascinating tour of mankind’s relationship to the sea, from the earliest traces of water on earth to the oceans as we know them today. In the process, Roberts looks at how the taming of the oceans has shaped human civilization and affected marine life. We have always been fish eaters, from the dawn of civilization, but in the last twenty years we have transformed the oceans beyond recognition. Putting our exploitation of the seas into historical context, Roberts offers a devastating account of the impact of modern fishing techniques, pollution, and climate change, and reveals what it would take to steer the right course while there is still time. Like Four Fish and The Omnivore’s Dilemma, The Ocean of Life takes a long view to tell a story in which each one of us has a role to play.

Chasing the Sun

The Epic Story of the Star That Gives us Life
Author: Richard Cohen
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0857209809
Category: History
Page: 704
View: 7143

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The Sun is so powerful, so much bigger than us, that it is a terrifying subject. Yet though we depend on it, we take it for granted. Amazingly the first book of its kind, CHASING THE SUNis a cultural and scientific history of our relationship with the star that gives us life. Richard Cohen, applying the same mix of wide-ranging reference and intimate detail that won outstanding reviews for By the Sword, travels from the ancient Greek astronomers to modern-day solar scientists, from Stonehenge to Antarctica (site of the solar eclipse of 2003, when penguins were said to sing), Mexico's Aztecs to the Norwegian city of Tromso, where for two months of the year there is no Sun at all. He introduces us to the crucial 'sunspot cycle' in modern economics, the religious dances of Indian tribesmen, the histories of sundials and calendars, the plight of migrating birds, the latest theories of global warming, and Galileo recording his discoveries in code, for fear of persecution. And throughout, there is the rich Sun literature -- from the writings of Homer through Dante and Nietzsche to Keats, Shelley and beyond. Blindingly impressive and hugely readable, this is a tour de force of narrative non-fiction.

Introduction to Marine Biogeochemistry


Author: Susan Libes
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 9780080916644
Category: Science
Page: 928
View: 8469

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Introduction to Marine Biogeochemistry focuses on the ocean's role in the biogeochemical cycling of selected elements and the impact of humans on the cycling of these elements. Among the topics covered are the chemical composition of seawater from the perspectives of elemental speciation and the impacts of solutes on water's physical behavior; biogeochemical phenomena which control accumulation and preservation of marine sediments; marine chemistry of radioactive and stable isotopes; and seawater pollution. The book contains many examples as well as steady-state models to aid readers in understanding this growing and complex science.. The focus of Introduction to Marine Biogeochemistry is the concept of the ocean as a system, linking land and atmospheric processes The text integrates the most current research, allowing students to learn concepts in context Includes detailed coverage of computational aspects

Song for the Blue Ocean

Encounters Along the World's Coasts and Beneath the Seas
Author: Carl Safina
Publisher: Holt Paperbacks
ISBN: 9781429984263
Category: Nature
Page: 480
View: 6297

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Part odyssey, part pilgrimage, this epic personal narrative follows the author's exploration of coasts, islands, reefs, and the sea's abyssal depths. Scientist and fisherman Carl Safina takes readers on a global journey of discovery, probing for truth about the world's changing seas, deftly weaving adventure, science, and political analysis.

Right Hand, Left Hand

The Origins of Asymmetry in Brains, Bodies, Atoms, and Cultures
Author: Chris McManus
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674016132
Category: Science
Page: 412
View: 1120

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Seeks to explore the nature of left- and right-handedness in nature and history, addressing such topics as the cognitive differences of left-handed people, the reason Arabic and Hebrew writing goes from right to left, and the reason tornadoes spin according to their hemispheres. (Science & Mathematics)

Exploring the Deep

The Titanic Expeditions
Author: James Cameron
Publisher: Insight Editions
ISBN: 9781608871223
Category: History
Page: 252
View: 9381

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Having undertaken more than thirty dives to the wreck of Titanic, acclaimed director James Cameron has probably gained more firsthand insight into the sinking of the ship than any person alive today. Now, more than one hundred years after the tragedy, Exploring the Deep provides a thrilling account of his remarkable expeditions and the incredible technological innovations that made them possible. Capturing all the excitement, danger, and wonder of these pioneering expeditions, Exploring the Deep also examines the legacy of Cameron's explorations and the considerable impact they have made on our understanding of the disaster. Showcasing a treasure trove of never-before-seen images captured inside previously unreachable areas of the wreck, is a dazzling visual chronicle of Cameron's expeditions that will enthrall experts and casual readers alike. Also featuring Cameron's exclusive dive journal and previously unpublished visual elements, including dive maps and personal photographs, this book is an emotional and evocative examination of the wreck from one of the most exciting figures in both filmmaking and exploration. Bolstered by contributors from three of the world's foremost Titanic experts, Don Lynch, Ken Marschall, and Parks Stephenson, Exploring the Deep is the definitive book on Cameron's expeditions and the last word on a historical event that continues to shock and beguile.

Talking Climate

From Research to Practice in Public Engagement
Author: Adam Corner,Jamie Clarke
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319467441
Category: Political Science
Page: 146
View: 1852

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This book describes a fresh approach to climate change communication: five core principles for public engagement that can propel climate change discourse out of the margins and into the mainstream. The question of how to communicate about climate change, and build public engagement in high-consuming, carbon-intensive Western nations, has occupied researchers, practitioners, and campaigners for more than two decades. During this time, limited progress has been made. Socially and culturally, climate change remains the preserve of a committed but narrow band of activists. Public engagement is stuck in second gear. By spanning the full width of the space between primary academic research and campaign strategies, this book will be relevant for academics, educators, campaigners, communicators and practitioners.