Mapping an Empire

The Geographical Construction of British India, 1765-1843
Author: Matthew H. Edney
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226184862
Category: Reference
Page: 480
View: 2560

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In this fascinating history of the British surveys of India, Matthew H. Edney relates how imperial Britain used modern survey techniques to not only create and define the spatial image of its Empire, but also to legitimate its colonialist activities. "There is much to be praised in this book. It is an excellent history of how India came to be painted red in the nineteenth century. But more importantly, Mapping an Empire sets a new standard for books that examine a fundamental problem in the history of European imperialism."—D. Graham Burnett, Times Literary Supplement "Mapping an Empire is undoubtedly a major contribution to the rapidly growing literature on science and empire, and a work which deserves to stimulate a great deal of fresh thinking and informed research."—David Arnold, Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History "This case study offers broadly applicable insights into the relationship between ideology, technology and politics. . . . Carefully read, this is a tale of irony about wishful thinking and the limits of knowledge."—Publishers Weekly

Mapping an Empire

The Geographical Construction of British India, 1765-1843
Author: Matthew H. Edney
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226184876
Category: History
Page: 458
View: 4813

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In this fascinating history of the British surveys of India, Matthew H. Edney relates how imperial Britain used modern survey techniques to not only create and define the spatial image of its Empire, but also to legitimate its colonialist activities. "There is much to be praised in this book. It is an excellent history of how India came to be painted red in the nineteenth century. But more importantly, Mapping an Empire sets a new standard for books that examine a fundamental problem in the history of European imperialism."—D. Graham Burnett, Times Literary Supplement "Mapping an Empire is undoubtedly a major contribution to the rapidly growing literature on science and empire, and a work which deserves to stimulate a great deal of fresh thinking and informed research."—David Arnold, Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History "This case study offers broadly applicable insights into the relationship between ideology, technology and politics. . . . Carefully read, this is a tale of irony about wishful thinking and the limits of knowledge."—Publishers Weekly

Producing India

From Colonial Economy to National Space
Author: Manu Goswami
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226305103
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 8763

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When did categories such as a national space and economy acquire self-evident meaning and a global reach? Why do nationalist movements demand a territorial fix between a particular space, economy, culture, and people? Producing India mounts a formidable challenge to the entrenched practice of methodological nationalism that has accorded an exaggerated privilege to the nation-state as a dominant unit of historical and political analysis. Manu Goswami locates the origins and contradictions of Indian nationalism in the convergence of the lived experience of colonial space, the expansive logic of capital, and interstate dynamics. Building on and critically extending subaltern and postcolonial perspectives, her study shows how nineteenth-century conceptions of India as a bounded national space and economy bequeathed an enduring tension between a universalistic political economy of nationhood and a nativist project that continues to haunt the present moment. Elegantly conceived and judiciously argued, Producing India will be invaluable to students of history, political economy, geography, and Asian studies.

Mapping India


Author: Manosi Lahiri
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9788189738983
Category: Art
Page: 320
View: 1898

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Travellers, wanderers, explorers and traders came overland from the West and carried back tales about the India of their perception. The first maps of India were drawn based on the accounts of these men. From the earliest chronicles of India to its post-Independence strides, this title tells the story of India recounted through its maps. It began five hundred years ago when the very first modern maps of India were drafted. Travellers, wanderers, explorers and traders came overland from the West and carried back tales about the India of their perception. The first maps of India

Cartographic Mexico

A History of State Fixations and Fugitive Landscapes
Author: Raymond B. Craib
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822334163
Category: History
Page: 300
View: 802

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This vivid social history reveals the powerful role that cartographic projects such as exploration, surveying, and mapping played in the creation of modern Mexico in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Raymond B. Craib describes the varied and pervasive attempts by government officials to determine the lines and claims that would define the nation. These projects included the privatization of communal lands; the delineation and archiving of village, municipal, state, and national boundaries; and the determination of waterways and water rights. As Craib emphasizes, the everyday processes of these cartographic routines proved to be much more conflicted than is indicated by their end products: maps with unitary and smooth faades. Taking central Veracruz as a case in point, Craib shows how agrarian officials, military surveyors, and metropolitan geographers traversed "fugitive landscapes" of overlapping jurisdictions and use-rights, opaque tenure systems, confusing property regimes, ambiguous borders, and shifting place names. He draws on an array of sources--including maps, letters from campesinos, official reports, and surveyors' journals and correspondence--to trace the everyday, contested processes through which officials attempted to redefine and codify these landscapes in struggle with the villagers they encountered in the field. In the process, he demonstrates in meticulous detail how surveying and mapping were never mere technical procedures: they were--and remain to this day--profoundly social and political processes in which rural people, long ignored in the history of cartography, were actively involved.

Image and Logic

A Material Culture of Microphysics
Author: Peter Galison
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226279176
Category: Science
Page: 955
View: 5560

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This study engages with the impact of modern technology on experimental physicists. It reveals how the ever-increasing scale and complexity of apparatus has distanced physicists from the very science which drew them into experimenting, and has fragmented microphysics into different technical traditions.

Geopolitics and Empire

The Legacy of Halford Mackinder
Author: Gerry Kearns
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0199230110
Category: History
Page: 344
View: 1403

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The United States is currently engaged in building and justifying its Empire. In doing this it draws upon a set of ideas that have come to be known as Geopolitics. These ideas have been current with many other ideologists of Empire, from Edwardian Britain, to Nazi Germany, to Soviet Russia, to Cold War USA, to post-Soviet Russia. This book examines the long entanglement between ideas of Geopolitics and the ideology and practices of Empire tracing these mattersback to the true founder of Geopolitics, a British geographer of the early-twentieth century, Halford Mackinder. His was an eventful life, and he was at various times an explorer, the leader of a mission to displace the Bolshevik regime from Russia in 1919, an MP, and the Director of the London Schoolof Economics. The book also considers how these ideas are used to justify the Neo-Conservative view of foreign policy in the United States today. It ends by proposing an alternative, more progressive version of Geopolitics.

The Company-State

Corporate Sovereignty and the Early Modern Foundations of the British Empire in India
Author: Philip J. Stern
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199930368
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 316
View: 9325

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The Company-State offers a political and intellectual history of the English East India Company in the century before its acquisition of territorial power. It argues the Company was no mere merchant, but a form of early modern, colonial state and sovereign that laid the foundations for the British Empire in India.

Siam Mapped

A History of the Geo-Body of a Nation
Author: Thongchai Winichakul
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: 9780824819743
Category: History
Page: 228
View: 8008

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This study of nationhood explores the 19th-century confrontation of ideas that transformed the kingdom of Siam into the modern conception of a nation. Siam Mapped demonstrates that the physical and political definition of Thailand on which other works are based is anachronistic.

Growing Prosperity

The Battle for Growth with Equity in the Twenty-first Century
Author: Barry Bluestone,Bennett Harrison
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520230705
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 345
View: 1762

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"Growing Prosperity could well be as important in shaping our future as Keynes' General Theory. . . . A work as meticulous as it is powerful, as promising as it is persuasive."—Robert Heilbroner, author of The Worldly Philosophers "Bluestone and Harrison have alerted us to the key issue confronting America: how to achieve growth with equity. This country needs a powerful dialogue on how to continue growth while deepening its benefits to all Americans. This is the blueprint for the terms of that debate."—U.S. Representative Richard Gephardt

A Paper Landscape

The Ordnance Survey in Nineteenth-century Ireland
Author: John Harwood Andrews
Publisher: Four Courts PressLtd
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 350
View: 5195

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For many years after its foundation in 1791, the Ordnance Survey was mainly concerned with making small-scale military maps of England. The department had no definite plans for Ireland until 1824, when it was directed to map the whole country (as a prelude to a nationwide valuation of land and buildings) as quickly as possible on the large scale of six inches to the mile. After many delays and some mistakes, economy and accuracy were brought to this new task by applying the division of labour in a complex succession of cartographic operations, outdoor and indoor, each of which was as far as possible checked by one or more of the others. A similar system was later adopted by the Survey's British branch. The six-inch maps of Ireland appeared between 1835 and 1846, during which time they evolved from merely skeleton maps (Sir James Carmichael Smyth) into a full face portrait of the land (Thomas Larcom). It was originally intended to accompany them with written topographical descriptions, but only one of these had been published when the idea was abandoned in 1840. The revision of the maps, begun in 1844, was more successfully pursued, though like the original survey it presented new and challenging problems. In the 1850s the production of both smaller and larger scale maps of Ireland was placed on a regular footing. The survey's Dublin office was kept in being to carry out these tasks, which were not completed until almost the end of the century. The above mentioned topics are fully described in this thesis. Meanwhile a new and separate chain of events had begun in 1887 with the authorization of cadastral maps of Ireland on the scale of 1/2500. The latter, together with some more recent aspects of Irish Survey history, form the subject of a brief postscript.

The History of British India

From 1805-1835
Author: Horace Hayman Wilson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: India
Page: N.A
View: 4815

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A continuation of Mill's "History of British India."

Encyclopedia of Human Geography


Author: Barney Warf
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 0761988580
Category: Reference
Page: 616
View: 9771

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With more than 300 entries written by an international team of leading authorities in the field, the Encyclopedia of Human Geography offers a comprehensive overview of the major ideas, concepts, terms, and approaches that characterize a notoriously diverse field. This multidisciplinary volume provides cross-cultural coverage of human geography as it is understood in the contemporary world and takes into account the enormous conceptual changes that have evolved since the 1970s, including a variety of social constructivist approaches.

Maps and History

Constructing Images of the Past
Author: Jeremy Black
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300086935
Category: History
Page: 267
View: 3467

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Explores the role, development, and nature of the atlas and discusses its impact on the presentation of the past.

Between Woman and Nation

Nationalisms, Transnational Feminisms, and the State
Author: Caren Kaplan,Norma Alarcón,Minoo Moallem
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822323228
Category: Social Science
Page: 407
View: 9135

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Homeland, country, region, locality, and globalisation: all words whose definitions in turn affect the definition of the word "woman." The essays in Between Woman and Nation discuss women in diverse locales-ranging from Quebec to Beirut. The contributors-leading scholars of gender, ethnicity, trans-nationalism, and globalisation-are united in their determination to locate and describe the performative space of interactions between woman and nation, interactions which frequently confound and resist essentialised notions of either. Divided into three parts, the collection first examines constructions of nationalism and communities whose practices complicate these constructions. The second section investigates regulations of particular nation-states and how they affect the lives of women, while the third presents studies of trans-national identity formation, in which contributors critique ideas such as "multicultural nationalism" and "global feminism." In its demonstration of the critical possibilities of feminist alliances across discrepant and distinct material conditions, Between Woman and Nation will make a unique contribution to women's studies, feminist theory, studies of globalisation and trans-nationalism, ethnic studies, and cultural studies.

Orientalism

History, Theory and the Arts
Author: John MacKenzie,John MacDonald MacKenzie
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 9780719045783
Category: Art
Page: 232
View: 2436

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The Orientalism debate, inspired by the work of Edward Said, has been a major source of cross-disciplinary controversy. This work offers a re-evaluation of this vast literature of Orientalism by a historian of imperalism, giving it a historical perspective

Masters of All They Surveyed

Exploration, Geography, and a British El Dorado
Author: D. Graham Burnett
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226081212
Category: History
Page: 314
View: 7260

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Chronicling the British pursuit of the legendary El Dorado, Masters of All They Surveyed tells the fascinating story of geography, cartography, and scientific exploration in Britain's unique South American colony, Guyana. How did nineteenth-century Europeans turn areas they called terra incognita into bounded colonial territories? How did a tender-footed gentleman, predisposed to seasickness (and unable to swim), make his way up churning rivers into thick jungle, arid savanna, and forbidding mountain ranges, survive for the better part of a decade, and emerge with a map? What did that map mean? In answering these questions, D. Graham Burnett brings to light the work of several such explorers, particularly Sir Robert H. Schomburgk, the man who claimed to be the first to reach the site of Ralegh's El Dorado. Commissioned by the Royal Geographical Society and later by the British Crown, Schomburgk explored and mapped regions in modern Brazil, Venezuela, and Guyana, always in close contact with Amerindian communities. Drawing heavily on the maps, reports, and letters that Schomburgk sent back to England, and especially on the luxuriant images of survey landmarks in his Twelve Views in the Interior of Guiana (reproduced in color in this book), Burnett shows how a vast network of traverse surveys, illustrations, and travel narratives not only laid out the official boundaries of British Guiana but also marked out a symbolic landscape that fired the British imperial imagination. Engagingly written and beautifully illustrated, Masters of All They Surveyed will interest anyone who wants to understand the histories of colonialism and science.

A Search for Sovereignty

Law and Geography in European Empires, 1400–1900
Author: Lauren Benton
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107782716
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 804

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A Search for Sovereignty approaches world history by examining the relation of law and geography in European empires between 1400 and 1900. Lauren Benton argues that Europeans imagined imperial space as networks of corridors and enclaves, and that they constructed sovereignty in ways that merged ideas about geography and law. Conflicts over treason, piracy, convict transportation, martial law, and crime created irregular spaces of law, while also attaching legal meanings to familiar geographic categories such as rivers, oceans, islands, and mountains. The resulting legal and spatial anomalies influenced debates about imperial constitutions and international law both in the colonies and at home. This study changes our understanding of empire and its legacies and opens new perspectives on the global history of law.