Mapping an Empire

The Geographical Construction of British India, 1765-1843
Author: Matthew H. Edney
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226184862
Category: Reference
Page: 480
View: 7952

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In this fascinating history of the British surveys of India, Matthew H. Edney relates how imperial Britain used modern survey techniques to not only create and define the spatial image of its Empire, but also to legitimate its colonialist activities. "There is much to be praised in this book. It is an excellent history of how India came to be painted red in the nineteenth century. But more importantly, Mapping an Empire sets a new standard for books that examine a fundamental problem in the history of European imperialism."—D. Graham Burnett, Times Literary Supplement "Mapping an Empire is undoubtedly a major contribution to the rapidly growing literature on science and empire, and a work which deserves to stimulate a great deal of fresh thinking and informed research."—David Arnold, Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History "This case study offers broadly applicable insights into the relationship between ideology, technology and politics. . . . Carefully read, this is a tale of irony about wishful thinking and the limits of knowledge."—Publishers Weekly

Erdbeeren und Piraten

Die Royal Navy und die Ordnung der Welt 1770–1860
Author: Julia Angster
Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
ISBN: 3525300379
Category: History
Page: 345
View: 2041

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Machtpolitik auf den Meeren – wie sich Großbritannien seine Weltmachtstellung im 19. Jahrhundert sicherte.

Cultural Sociology of the Middle East, Asia, and Africa

An Encyclopedia
Author: Andrea L. Stanton,Edward Ramsamy,Peter J. Seybolt,Carolyn M. Elliott
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 145226662X
Category: Social Science
Page: 1976
View: 8868

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In our age of globalization and multiculturalism, it has never been more important for Americans to understand and appreciate foreign cultures and how people live, love, and learn in areas of the world unfamiliar to most U.S. students and the general public. The four volumes in our cultural sociology reference encyclopedia take a step forward in this endeavor by presenting concise information on those regions likely to be most "foreign" to U.S. students: the Middle East, Asia, and Africa. The intent is to convey what daily life is like for people in these selected regions. It is hoped entries within these volumes will aid readers in efforts to understand the importance of cultural sociology, to appreciate the effects of cultural forces around the world, and to learn the history of countries and cultures within these important regions.

Key Concepts in Geography


Author: Sarah Holloway,Stephen P Rice,Gill Valentine
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9780761973898
Category: Science
Page: 342
View: 3386

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Defining the key terms that inform the language of geography and define the geographical imagination: space, time, place, scale, landscape, this volume provides definitions of terms from both human and physical geography.

Mapping the Cold War

Cartography and the Framing of America’s International Power
Author: Timothy Barney
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469618559
Category: History
Page: 338
View: 8770

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In this fascinating history of Cold War cartography, Timothy Barney considers maps as central to the articulation of ideological tensions between American national interests and international aspirations. Barney argues that the borders, scales, projections, and other conventions of maps prescribed and constrained the means by which foreign policy elites, popular audiences, and social activists navigated conflicts between North and South, East and West. Maps also influenced how identities were formed in a world both shrunk by advancing technologies and marked by expanding and shifting geopolitical alliances and fissures. Pointing to the necessity of how politics and values were "spatialized" in recent U.S. history, Barney argues that Cold War–era maps themselves had rhetorical lives that began with their conception and production and played out in their circulation within foreign policy circles and popular media. Reflecting on the ramifications of spatial power during the period, Mapping the Cold War ultimately demonstrates that even in the twenty-first century, American visions of the world--and the maps that account for them--are inescapably rooted in the anxieties of that earlier era.

Geographies of the Romantic North

Science, Antiquarianism, and Travel, 1790–1830
Author: A. Byrne
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137311320
Category: History
Page: 265
View: 5096

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This book examines British scientific and antiquarian travels in the "North," circa 1790–1830. British perceptions, representations and imaginings of the North are considered part of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century processes of British self-fashioning as a Northern nation, and key in unifying the expanding North Atlantic empire.

Places in Motion

The Fluid Identities of Temples, Images, and Pilgrims
Author: Jacob N. Kinnard
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199359687
Category: Religion
Page: 320
View: 2423

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Jacob Kinnard offers an in-depth examination of the complex dynamics of religiously charged places. Focusing on several important shared and contested pilgrimage places-Ground Zero and Devils Tower in the United States, Ayodhya and Bodhgaya in India, Karbala in Iraq-he poses a number of crucial questions. What and who has made these sites important, and why? How are they shared, and how and why are they contested? What is at stake in their contestation? How are the particular identities of place and space established? How are individual and collective identity intertwined with space and place? Challenging long-accepted, clean divisions of the religious world, Kinnard explores specific instances of the vibrant messiness of religious practice, the multivocality of religious objects, the fluid and hybrid dynamics of religious places, and the shifting and tangled identities of religious actors. He contends that sacred space is a constructed idea: places are not sacred in and of themselves, but are sacred because we make them sacred. As such, they are in perpetual motion, transforming themselves from moment to moment and generation to generation. Places in Motion moves comfortably across and between a variety of historical and cultural settings as well as academic disciplines, providing a deft and sensitive approach to the topic of sacred places, with awareness of political, economic, and social realities as these exist in relation to questions of identity. It is a lively and much needed critical advance in analytical reflections on sacred space and pilgrimage.

Mappings


Author: Denis Cosgrove
Publisher: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 1861898363
Category: Education
Page: 320
View: 4498

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Mappings explores what mapping has meant in the past and how its meanings have altered. How have maps and mapping served to order and represent physical, social and imaginative worlds? How has the practice of mapping shaped modern seeing and knowing? In what ways do contemporary changes in our experience of the world alter the meanings and practice of mapping, and vice versa? In their diverse expressions, maps and the representational processes of mapping have constructed the spaces of modernity since the early Renaissance. The map's spatial fixity, its capacity to frame, control and communicate knowledge through combining image and text, and cartography's increasing claims to scientific authority, make mapping at once an instrument and a metaphor for rational understanding of the world. Among the topics the authors investigate are projective and imaginative mappings; mappings of terraqueous spaces; mapping and localism at the 'chorographic' scale; and mapping as personal exploration. With essays by Jerry Brotton, Paul Carter, Michael Charlesworth, James Corner, Wystan Curnow, Christian Jacob, Luciana de Lima Martins, David Matless, Armand Mattelart, Lucia Nuti and Alessandro Scafi

The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Cultural Geography


Author: Nuala C. Johnson,Richard H. Schein,Jamie Winders
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118384431
Category: Social Science
Page: 568
View: 8688

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**Named a 2014 Choice Outstanding Academic Title** Combining coverage of key themes and debates from a variety ofhistorical and theoretical perspectives, this authoritativereference volume offers the most up-to-date and substantiveanalysis of cultural geography currently available. A significantly revised new edition covering a number of newtopics such as biotechnology, rural, food, media and tech, bordersand tourism, whilst also reflecting developments in establishedsubjects including animal geographies Edited and written by the leading authorities in thisfast-developing discipline, and features a host of new contributorsto the second edition Traces the historical evolution of cultural geography throughto the very latest research Provides an international perspective, reflecting the advancingacademic traditions of non-Western institutions, especially inAsia Features a thematic structure, with sections exploring topicssuch as identities, nature and culture, and flows and mobility

Moral Geography

Maps, Missionaries, and the American Frontier
Author: Amy DeRogatis
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023150859X
Category: Religion
Page: 256
View: 4460

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Moral Geography traces the development of a moral basis for American expansionism, as Protestant missionaries, using biblical language and metaphors, imaginatively conjoined the cultivation of souls with the cultivation of land and made space sacred. While the political implications of the mapping of American expansion have been much studied, this is the first major study of the close and complex relationship between mapping and missionizing on the American frontier. Moral Geography provides a fresh approach to understanding nineteenth-century Protestant home missions in Ohio's Western Reserve. Through the use of maps, letters, religious tracts, travel narratives, and geographical texts, Amy DeRogatis recovers the struggles of settlers, land surveyors, missionaries, and geographers as they sought to reconcile their hopes and expectations for a Promised Land with the realities of life on the early American frontier.

CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY IN PRACTICE


Author: Miles Ogborn,Alison Blunt,Pyrs Gruffudd,David Pinder
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134662068
Category: Science
Page: 224
View: 4190

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Cultural Geography in Practice provides an innovative and accessible approach to the sources, theories and methods of cultural geography. Written by an international team of prominent cultural geographers, all of whom are experienced researchers, this book is a fully illustrated guide to methodological approaches in cultural geography. In order to demonstrate the practice of cultural geography each chapter combines the following features: ·Practical instruction in using one of the main methods of cultural geography (e.g. interviewing, interpreting texts and visual images, participatory methods) ·An overview of a key area of concern in cultural geography (e.g. the body, national identity, empire, marginality) ·A nuts and bolts description of the actual application of the theories and methods within a piece of research With the addition of boxed definitions of key concepts and descriptions of research projects by students who devised and undertook them, Cultural Geography in Practice is an essential manual of research practice for both undergraduate and graduate geography students.

Romantic Literature and Postcolonial Studies


Author: Elizabeth A Bohls
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748678751
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 224
View: 6184

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This book examines the relationship between Romantic writing and the rapidly expanding British Empire.

Space and Place in Children’s Literature, 1789 to the Present


Author: Maria Sachiko Cecire,Hannah Field,Kavita Mudan Finn,Malini Roy
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 147242056X
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 266
View: 957

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Focusing on questions of space and locale in children’s literature, this collection explores how metaphorical and physical space can create landscapes of power, knowledge, and identity in texts from the early nineteenth century to the present. The collection is comprised of four sections that take up the space between children and adults, the representation of 'real world' places, fantasy travel and locales, and the physical space of the children’s book-as-object. In their essays, the contributors analyze works from a range of sources and traditions by authors such as Sylvia Plath, Maria Edgeworth, Gloria Anzaldúa, Jenny Robson, C.S. Lewis, Elizabeth Knox, and Claude Ponti. While maintaining a focus on how location and spatiality aid in defining the child’s relationship to the world, the essays also address themes of borders, displacement, diaspora, exile, fantasy, gender, history, home-leaving and homecoming, hybridity, mapping, and metatextuality. With an epilogue by Philip Pullman in which he discusses his own relationship to image and locale, this collection is also a valuable resource for understanding the work of this celebrated author of children’s literature.

Reinventing India

Liberalization, Hindu Nationalism and Popular Democracy
Author: Stuart Corbridge,John Harriss
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745666043
Category: Political Science
Page: 336
View: 3785

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When India was invented as a "modern" country in the years after Independence in 1947 it styled itself as a secular, federal, democratic Republic committed to an ideology of development. Nehru's India never quite fulfilled this promise, but more recently his vision of India has been challenged by two "revolts of the elites": those of economic liberalization and Hindu nationalism. These revolts have been challenged, in turn, by various movements, including those of India's "Backward Classes". These movements have exploited the democratic spaces of India both to challenge for power and to contest prevailing accounts of politics, the state and modernity. Reinventing India offers an analytical account of the history of modern India and of its contemporary reinvention. Part One traces India's transformation under colonial rule, and the ideas and social forces which underlay the deliberations of the Constituent Assembly in 1946 to consider the shaping of the post-colonial state. Part Two then narrates the story of the making and unmaking of this modern India in the period from 1950 to the present day. It pays attention to both economic and political developments, and engages with the interpretations of India's recent history through key writers such as Francine Frankel, Sudipta Kaviraj and Partha Chatterjee. Part Three consists of chapters on the dialectics of economic reform, religion, the politics of Hindu nationalism, and on popular democracy. These chapters articulate a distinct position on the state and society in India at the end of the century, and they allow the authors to engage with the key debates which concern public intellectuals in contemporary India. Reinventing India is a lucid and eminently readable account of the transformations which are shaking India more than fifty years after Independence. It will be welcomed by all students of South Asia, and will be of interest to students of comparative politics and development studies.

The Power of Knowledge

How Information and Technology Made the Modern World
Author: Jeremy Black
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 030019854X
Category: History
Page: 504
View: 7797

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Information is power. For more than five hundred years the success or failure of nations has been determined by a country’s ability to acquire knowledge and technical skill and transform them into strength and prosperity. Leading historian Jeremy Black approaches global history from a distinctive perspective, focusing on the relationship between information and society and demonstrating how the understanding and use of information have been the primary factors in the development and character of the modern age. Black suggests that the West’s ascension was a direct result of its institutions and social practices for acquiring, employing, and retaining information and the technology that was ultimately produced. His cogent and well-reasoned analysis looks at cartography and the hardware of communication, armaments and sea power, mercantilism and imperialism, science and astronomy, as well as bureaucracy and the management of information, linking the history of technology with the history of global power while providing important indicators for the future of our world.

Digital Anthropology


Author: Heather A. Horst,Daniel Miller
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 0857852930
Category: Social Science
Page: 328
View: 7247

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Anthropology has two main tasks: to understand what it is to be human and to examine how humanity is manifested differently in the diversity of culture. These tasks have gained new impetus from the extraordinary rise of the digital. This book brings together several key anthropologists working with digital culture to demonstrate just how productive an anthropological approach to the digital has already become. Through a range of case studies from Facebook to Second Life to Google Earth, Digital Anthropology explores how human and digital can be defined in relation to one another, from avatars and disability; cultural differences in how we use social networking sites or practise religion; the practical consequences of the digital for politics, museums, design, space and development to new online world and gaming communities. The book also explores the moral universe of the digital, from new anxieties to open-source ideals. Digital Anthropology reveals how only the intense scrutiny of ethnography can overturn assumptions about the impact of digital culture and reveal its profound consequences for everyday life. Combining the clarity of a textbook with an engaging style which conveys a passion for these new frontiers of enquiry, this book is essential reading for students and scholars of anthropology, media studies, communication studies, cultural studies and sociology.

Scrambling for Africa

AIDS, Expertise, and the Rise of American Global Health Science
Author: Johanna Tayloe Crane
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801469058
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 1922

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Countries in sub-Saharan Africa were once dismissed by Western experts as being too poor and chaotic to benefit from the antiretroviral drugs that transformed the AIDS epidemic in the United States and Europe. Today, however, the region is courted by some of the most prestigious research universities in the world as they search for “resource-poor” hospitals in which to base their international HIV research and global health programs. In Scrambling for Africa, Johanna Tayloe Crane reveals how, in the space of merely a decade, Africa went from being a continent largely excluded from advancements in HIV medicine to an area of central concern and knowledge production within the increasingly popular field of global health science. Drawing on research conducted in the U.S. and Uganda during the mid-2000s, Crane provides a fascinating ethnographic account of the transnational flow of knowledge, politics, and research money—as well as blood samples, viruses, and drugs. She takes readers to underfunded Ugandan HIV clinics as well as to laboratories and conference rooms in wealthy American cities like San Francisco and Seattle where American and Ugandan experts struggle to forge shared knowledge about the AIDS epidemic. The resulting uncomfortable mix of preventable suffering, humanitarian sentiment, and scientific ambition shows how global health research partnerships may paradoxically benefit from the very inequalities they aspire to redress. A work of outstanding interdisciplinary scholarship, Scrambling for Africa will be of interest to audiences in anthropology, science and technology studies, African studies, and the medical humanities.

Auf den Spuren des Körpers in einer technogenen Welt


Author: Barbara Duden,Dorothee Noeres
Publisher: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 431
View: 6572

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Die rasch wachsende Zahl neuerer Studien zum ,Körper' spiegelt die akute Umformung der Wahrnehmung von ,Körper' im Zuge trivialisierter Genetik, Medizin- und Reproduktionstechnologie, virtueller Repräsentation in den industrialisierten Ländern einerseits und der wachsenden Bedeutung des ,Körpers' in ethnischen Konflikten, fundamentalistischen Politiken kollektiver Identität, in Bürgerkrieg, Militarismus und Gewalt gegen Frauen andererseits. Der Projektbereich KÖRPER der Internationalen Frauenuniversität lud Wissenschaftlerinnen zu einer ,Körper-Akademie' ein, um ihren Ansatz, ihr Vorgehen und ihre Resultate zur Diskussion zu stellen. Der Band versammelt die besten Aufsätze dieses Gesprächs über das zeitgeschichtliche Schicksal des Frauenkörpers von bisher im Deutschsprachigen nicht zugänglichen Autorinnen. Unsere Überzeugung, dass die zeitgeschichtliche Problematik verfehlt wird, wenn der Frauen-,Körper' als Resultat von Produktions- und Konstruktionsleistungen behandelt wird, leitet die Suche nach den somatischen Erfahrungen von Frauen in einer technogenen Welt: Die ,Subjekt-Position', die ,Stimme' hat Vorrang.