Making Volunteers

Civic Life after Welfare's End
Author: Nina Eliasoph
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400838820
Category: Social Science
Page: 336
View: 2599

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Volunteering improves inner character, builds community, cures poverty, and prevents crime. We've all heard this kind of empowerment talk from nonprofit and government-sponsored civic programs. But what do these programs really accomplish? In Making Volunteers, Nina Eliasoph offers an in-depth, humorous, wrenching, and at times uplifting look inside youth and adult civic programs. She reveals an urgent need for policy reforms in order to improve these organizations and shows that while volunteers learn important lessons, they are not always the lessons that empowerment programs aim to teach. With short-term funding and a dizzy mix of mandates from multiple sponsors, community programs develop a complex web of intimacy, governance, and civic life. Eliasoph describes the at-risk youth served by such programs, the college-bound volunteers who hope to feel selfless inspiration and plump up their resumés, and what happens when the two groups are expected to bond instantly through short-term projects. She looks at adult "plug-in" volunteers who, working in after-school programs and limited by time, hope to become like beloved aunties to youth. Eliasoph indicates that adult volunteers can provide grassroots support but they can also undermine the family-like warmth created by paid organizers. Exploring contradictions between the democratic rhetoric of empowerment programs and the bureaucratic hurdles that volunteers learn to navigate, the book demonstrates that empowerment projects work best with less precarious funding, more careful planning, and mandatory training, reflection, and long-term commitments from volunteers. Based on participant research inside civic and community organizations, Making Volunteers illustrates what these programs can and cannot achieve, and how to make them more effective.

Avoiding Politics

How Americans Produce Apathy in Everyday Life
Author: Nina Eliasoph
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521587594
Category: Political Science
Page: 330
View: 8766

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Nina Eliasoph's vivid portrait of American civic life reveals an intriguing culture of political avoidance. Despite the importance for democracy of open-ended political conversation among ordinary citizens, many Americans try hard to avoid appearing to care about politics. To discover how, where and why Americans create this culture of avoidance, the author accompanied suburban volunteers, activists, and recreation club members for over two years, listening to them talk - and avoid talking - about the wider world, together and in encounters with government, media, and corporate authorities. She shows how citizens create and express ideas in everyday life, contrasting their privately expressed convictions with their lack of public political engagement. Her book challenges received ideas about culture, power and democracy, while exposing the hard work of producing apathy.

The Oxford Handbook of Cultural Sociology


Author: Jeffrey C. Alexander,Ronald N. Jacobs,Philip Smith
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195377761
Category: Social Science
Page: 818
View: 8852

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Explains the social science of cultural sociology, a study of the ways in which culture, society, politics, and economy interact in the world.

Civic Imagination

Making a Difference in American Political Life
Author: Gianpaolo Baiocchi,Elizabeth A Bennett,Alissa Cordner,Peter Klein,Stephanie Savell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317262409
Category: Political Science
Page: 184
View: 4916

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The Civic Imagination provides a rich empirical description of civic life and a broader discussion of the future of democracy in contemporary America. Over the course of a year, five researchers observed and participated in 7 civic organisations in a mid-sized US city. They draw on this ethnographic evidence to map the 'civic imaginations' that motivate citizenship engagement in America today. The book unpacks how contemporary Americans think about and act toward positive social and political change while the authors' findings challenge contemporary assertions of American apathy. This will be an important book for students and academics interested in political science and sociology.

Community-Based Global Learning

The Theory and Practice of Ethical Engagement at Home and Abroad
Author: Eric Hartman,Richard C. Kiely,Jessica Friedrichs,Christopher Boettcher
Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 162036090X
Category: Education
Page: 288
View: 5887

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International education, service-learning, and community-based global learning programs are robust with potential. They can positively impact communities, grow civil society networks, and have transformative effects for students who become more globally aware and more engaged in global civil society – at home and abroad. Yet such programs are also packed with peril. Clear evidence indicates that poor forms of such programming have negative impacts on vulnerable persons, including medical patients and children, while cementing stereotypes and reinforcing patterns of privilege and exclusion. These dangers can be mitigated, however, through collaborative planning, design, and evaluation that advances mutually beneficial community partnerships, critically reflective practice, thoughtful facilitation, and creative use of resources. Drawing on research and insights from several academic disciplines and community partner perspectives, along with the authors’ decades of applied, community-based development and education experience, they present a model of community-based global learning that clearly espouses an equitable balance between learning methodology and a community development philosophy. Emphasizing the key drivers of community-driven learning and service, cultural humility and exchange, seeking global citizenship, continuous and diverse forms of critically reflective practice, and ongoing attention to power and privilege, this book constitutes a guide to course or program design that takes into account the unpredictable and dynamic character of domestic and international community-based global learning experiences, the varying characteristics of destination communities, and a framework through which to integrate any discipline or collaborative project. Readers will appreciate the numerous toolboxes and reflective exercises to help them think through the creation of independent programming or courses that support targeted learning and community-driven development. The book ultimately moves beyond course and program design to explore how to integrate these objectives and values in the wider curriculum and throughout formal and informal community-based learning partnerships.

The SAGE Handbook of the Sociology of Work and Employment


Author: Stephen Edgell,Heidi Gottfried,Edward Granter
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1473943280
Category: Social Science
Page: 728
View: 4578

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The SAGE Handbook of the Sociology of Work and Employment is a landmark collection of original contributions by leading specialists from around the world. The coverage is both comprehensive and comparative (in terms of time and space) and each ‘state of the art’ chapter provides a critical review of the literature combined with some thoughts on the direction of research. This authoritative text is structured around six core themes: Historical Context and Social Divisions The Experience of Work The Organization of Work Nonstandard Work and Employment Work and Life beyond Employment Globalization and the Future of Work. Globally, the contours of work and employment are changing dramatically. This handbook helps academics and practitioners make sense of the impact of these changes on individuals, groups, organizations and societies. Written in an accessible style with a helpful introduction, the retrospective and prospective nature of this volume will be an essential resource for students, teachers and policy-makers across a range of fields, from business and management, to sociology and organization studies.

The Politics of Volunteering


Author: Nina Eliasoph
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745669565
Category: Political Science
Page: 200
View: 9999

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Many of us may have participated in grassroots groups, changing the world in small and big ways, from building playgrounds and feeding the homeless, to protesting wars and ending legal segregation. Beyond the obvious fruits of these activities, what are the broader consequences of volunteering for the participants, recipients of aid, and society as a whole? In this engaging new book, Nina Eliasoph encourages readers to reflect on their own experiences in civic associations as an entry point into bigger sociological, political, and philosophical issues, such as class inequality, how organizations work, differences in political systems around the globe, and the sources of moral selfhood. Claims about volunteering tend to be astronomical: it will create democracy, make you a better person, eliminate poverty, protect local cultures, and even prevent illness. Eliasoph cuts through these assertions by drawing on empirical studies, key data, real-life case studies, and a range of theoretical analyses. In doing so, the book provides students of sociology, political science, and communications studies with a framework for evaluating the role of civic associations in social and political life, as well as in their own lives as active citizens.

Elusive Togetherness

Church Groups Trying to Bridge America's Divisions
Author: Paul Lichterman
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691096511
Category: Religion
Page: 331
View: 6970

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Many scholars and citizens alike have counted on civic groups to create broad ties that bind society. Some hope that faith-based civic groups will spread their reach as government retreats. Yet few studies ask how, if at all, civic groups reach out to their wider community. Can religious groups--long central in civic America--create broad, empowering social ties in an unequal, diverse society? Over three years, Paul Lichterman studied nine liberal and conservative Protestant-based volunteering and advocacy projects in a mid-sized American city. He listened as these groups tried to create bridges with other community groups, social service agencies, and low-income people, just as the 1996 welfare reforms were taking effect. Counter to long-standing arguments, Lichterman discovered that powerful customs of interaction inside the groups often stunted external ties and even shaped religion's impact on the groups. Comparing groups, he found that successful bridges outward depend on group customs which invite reflective, critical discussion about a group's place amid surrounding groups and institutions. Combining insights from Alexis de Tocqueville, John Dewey, and Jane Addams with contemporary sociology, Elusive Togetherness addresses enduring questions about civic and religious life that elude the popular "social capital" concept. To create broad civic relationships, groups need more than the right religious values, political beliefs, or resources. They must learn new ways of being groups.

Media and the Restyling of Politics

Consumerism, Celebrity and Cynicism
Author: John Corner,Dick Pels
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9780761949213
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 210
View: 3746

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Bringing together the work of leading academics in media and cultural studies, this book questions the ways in which emerging forms of political style relate not only to new conventions of celebrity and publicity but to ideas about representation, citizenship and the democratic process.

Bowling Alone

The Collapse and Revival of American Community
Author: Robert D. Putnam
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743203046
Category: History
Page: 541
View: 4497

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Shows how changes in work, family structure, women's roles, and other factors have caused people to become increasingly disconnected from family, friends, neighbors, and democratic structures--and how they may reconnect.

The Tragedy of American Compassion


Author: Marvin Olasky
Publisher: Regnery Publishing
ISBN: 9780895267252
Category: Social Science
Page: 299
View: 5183

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"A richly documented, controversial history of the welfare state...." --Publishers Weekly

Suburban Warriors

The Origins of the New American Right
Author: Lisa McGirr
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691096117
Category: History
Page: 395
View: 4679

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A study of American conservatism revisits the early and mid-1960s to trace the roots of the conservative revival that eventually changed the American political landscape.

Department & Discipline

Chicago Sociology at One Hundred
Author: Andrew Abbott
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226000992
Category: Education
Page: 249
View: 9869

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In this detailed history of the Chicago School of Sociology, Andrew Abbott investigates central topics in the emergence of modern scholarship, paying special attention to "schools of science" and how such schools reproduce themselves over time. What are the preconditions from which schools arise? Do they exist as rigid rules or as flexible structures? How do they emerge from the day-to-day activities of academic life such as editing journals and writing papers? Abbott analyzes the shifts in social scientific inquiry and discloses the intellectual rivalry and faculty politics that characterized different stages of the Chicago School. Along the way, he traces the rich history of the discipline's main journal, the American Journal of Sociology. Embedded in this analysis of the school and its practices is a broader theoretical argument, which Abbott uses to redefine social objects as a sequence of interconnected events rather than as fixed entities. Abbott's theories grow directly out of the Chicago School's insistence that social life be located in time and place, a tradition that has been at the heart of the school since its founding one hundred years ago.

Stigma and Social Welfare


Author: Paul Spicker
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9780709933137
Category: Aide sociale - Bénéficiaires - Grande-Bretagne - Psychologie
Page: 227
View: 5434

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The Oxford Handbook of Political Communication


Author: Kate Kenski,Kathleen Hall Jamieson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199793484
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
View: 3757

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The scholarly field of political communication emerged in the first half of the twentieth century, amidst the turmoil of two world wars and the emergence of film, radio, and-eventually-television. As a subject of inquiry, political communication is interdisciplinary by its very nature, bridging rhetoric, public opinion, political behavior, political psychology, journalism, media studies, and telecommunications. In The Oxford Handbook of Political Communication, Kate Kenski and Kathleen Hall Jamieson bring together a diverse cast of leading scholars in the field, including some of its founders. Both definitive and foundational, the book covers a vast range of topics, including political advertising, agenda setting, framing, social media, and the functions of the press in a democratic system. The essays in this volume demonstrate that political communication is a hybrid field with complex ancestry, permeable boundaries, and interests that overlap with the related fields of political sociology, public opinion, rhetoric, neuroscience, and media psychology. A major addition to Oxford's handbook series, this is an indispensable reference for scholars and students interested in the study of how, why, when, and with what effect humans make sense of symbolic exchanges about sharing and shared power. The sixty-two chapters in The Oxford Handbook of Political Communication not only offer an overview of past scholarship; they also reflect on its relevance in a changing media landscape and set the agenda for future research in virtually every aspect of the discipline.

The Humane Metropolis

People and Nature in the 21st-century City
Author: Rutherford H. Platt
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 1558495541
Category: Architecture
Page: 326
View: 8874

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Four-fifths of Americans now live in the nation's sprawling metropolitan areas, and half of the world's population is now classified as "urban." As cities become the dominant living evironment for humans, there is growing concern about how to make such places more habitable, more healthy and safe, more ecological, and more equitable -- in short, more "humane." This book explores the prospects for a more humane metropolis through a series of essays and case studies that consider why and how urban places can be made greener and more amenable. Its point of departure is the legacy of William H. Whyte (1917-1999), one of America's most admired urban thinkers. From his eyrie high above Manhattan in the offices of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Whyte laid the foundation for today's "smart growth" and "new urbanist" movements with books such as The Last Landscape (1968). His passion for improving the habitability of cities and suburbs is reflected in the diverse grassroots urban design and regreening strategies discussed in this volume. Topics examined in this book include urban and regional greenspaces, urban ecological restoration, social equity, and green design. Some of the contributors are recognized academic experts, while others offer direct practical knowledge of particular problems and initiatives. The editor's introduction and epilogue set the individual chapters in a broader context and suggest how the strategies described, if widely replicated, may help create more humane urban environments. In addition to Rutherford H. Platt, contributors to the volume include Carl Anthony, Thomas Balsley, Timothy Beatley, Eugenie L. Birch, Edward J. Blakely, Colin M. Cathcart, Steven E. Clemants, Christopher A. De Sousa, Steven N. Handel, Peter Harnik, Michael C. Houck, Jerold S. Kayden, Albert LaFarge, Andrew Light, Charles E. Little, Anne C. Lusk, Thalya Parilla, Deborah E. Popper, Frank J. Popper, Mary V. Rickel, Cynthia Rosenzweig, Robert L. Ryan, Laurin N. Sievert, Andrew G. Wiley-Schwartz, and Ann Louise Strong. Included in the back of the book is a DVD of a 22-minute film created by Ted White, which serves as a companion to the text.

Volunteers

A Social Profile
Author: Marc A. Musick,John Wilson
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253116864
Category: Social Science
Page: 680
View: 6876

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Who tends to volunteer and why? What causes attract certain types of volunteers? What motivates people to volunteer? How can volunteers be persuaded to continue their service? Making use of a broad range of survey information to offer a detailed portrait of the volunteer in America, Volunteers provides an important resource for everyone who works with volunteers or is interested in their role in contemporary society. Mark A. Musick and John Wilson address issues of volunteer motivation by focusing on individuals' subjective states, their available resources, and the influence of gender and race. In a section on social context, they reveal how volunteer work is influenced by family relationships and obligations through the impact of schools, churches, and communities. They consider cross-national differences in volunteering and historical trends, and close with consideration of the research on the organization of volunteer work and the consequences of volunteering for the volunteer.

Outside the Fold

Conversion, Modernity, and Belief
Author: Gauri Viswanathan
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691058997
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 332
View: 2647

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In a radical reexamination of religious conversion, Gauri Viswanathan demonstrates how conversion, especially to a minority or alternative religion, actually may be an act of resistance to established authority. In a wholly original perspective, Viswanathan equates the convert as religious dissenter and as colonial subject. Illustrated.

Myths of Ethnicity and Nation

Immigration, Work, and Identity in the Belize Banana Industry
Author: Mark Moberg
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 9780870499708
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 218
View: 7707

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In this study, Mark Moberg examines the conflicts in Belize's ethnic and national identity by focusing on their effects and manifestations in the country's banana export industry.

Generating Social Capital

Civil Society and Institutions in Comparative Perspective
Author: M. Hooghe,D. Stolle
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1403979545
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 2332

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Social capital - networks of civic engagements, norms of reciprocity, and attitudes of trust - is widely seen as playing a key role for the health of democracy. While many authors have examined the consequences of social capital, there is a pressing need to explore its sources. This collection brings together leading American and European scholars in the first comparative analysis of how social trust and other civic attitudes are generated. The contributors to this volume examine the generation of social capital from two directions: society-based approaches that emphasize voluntary associations, and institutional approaches that emphasize policy.