Lonely Planet Dubai & Abu Dhabi


Author: Lonely Planet,Andrea Schulte-Peevers,Jenny Walker
Publisher: Lonely Planet
ISBN: 1743609582
Category: Travel
Page: N.A
View: 6285

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Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher Lonely Planet Dubai & Abu Dhabi is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Learn about Dubai through lifelike dioramas, shop for dazzling jewellery at Deira's Gold Souq, or join a walking tour of the Bastakia Quarter; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of Dubai and Abu Dhabi and begin your journey now! Inside Lonely Planet Dubai & Abu Dhabi Travel Guide: Colour maps and images throughout Highlights and itineraries help you tailor your trip to your personal needs and interests Insider tips to save time and money and get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spots Essential info at your fingertips - hours of operation, phone numbers, websites, transit tips, prices Honest reviews for all budgets - including eating, sleeping, sight-seeing, going out, shopping, and hidden gems that most guidebooks miss Cultural insights give you a richer and more rewarding travel experience - including customs, history, art, music, dance, architecture, politics, landscapes, wildlife Free, convenient pull-out Dubai map (included in print version), plus over 22 neighbourhood maps Covers Deira, Bur Dubai, Sheikh Zayed Road, Jumeirah, New Dubai, Abu Dhabi, and more eBook Features: (Best viewed on tablet and smartphone devices) Downloadable PDF and offline maps prevent roaming and data charges Effortlessly navigate and jump between maps and reviews Add notes to personalise your guidebook experience Seamlessly flip between pages Bookmarks and speedy search capabilities get you to key pages in a flash Embedded links to recommendations' websites Zoom-in maps and images Inbuilt dictionary for quick referencing The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet Dubai & Abu Dhabi , our most comprehensive guide to Dubai and Abu Dhabi, is perfect for those exploring top sights and taking the roads less travelled. Looking for just the highlights of Dubai? Check out Lonely Planet Pocket Dubai, a handy-sized guide focused on the can't-miss sights for a quick trip. Authors: Written and researched by Lonely Planet. About Lonely Planet: Since 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world's leading travel media company with guidebooks to every destination, an award-winning website, mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveller community. Lonely Planet covers must-see spots but also enables curious travellers to get off beaten paths to understand more of the culture of the places in which they find themselves.

Dubai & Abu Dhabi


Author: Josephine Quintero
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781742200224
Category: Travel
Page: 223
View: 4011

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Rev. ed. of: Dubai city guide / Andrea Schulte-Peevers. 2010.

Lonely Planet Pocket Abu Dhabi


Author: Lonely Planet,Jenny Walker
Publisher: Lonely Planet
ISBN: 1743609647
Category: Travel
Page: N.A
View: 8817

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Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher Lonely Planet Pocket Abu Dhabi is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Promenade along the waterfront Corniche, tour the magnificent Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque, or relax at a sheesha cafe; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of the best of Abu Dhabi and begin your journey now! Inside Lonely Planet Pocket Abu Dhabi: Full-colour maps and images throughout Highlights and itineraries help you tailor your trip to your personal needs and interests Insider tips to save time and money and get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spots Essential info at your fingertips - hours of operation, phone numbers, websites, transit tips, prices Honest reviews for all budgets - eating, sleeping, sight-seeing, going out, shopping, hidden gems that most guidebooks miss Free, convenient pull-out Abu Dhabi map (included in print version), plus over eight colour neighbourhood maps User-friendly layout with helpful icons, and organised by neighbourhood to help you pick the best spots to spend your time Covers Al Markaziyah, Tourist Club Area, Al Khadiya, Breakwater, Yas Island and more eBook Features: (Best viewed on tablet devices and smartphones) Downloadable PDF and offline maps prevent roaming and data charges Effortlessly navigate and jump between maps and reviews Add notes to personalize your guidebook experience Seamlessly flip between pages Bookmarks and speedy search capabilities get you to key pages in a flash Embedded links to recommendations' websites Zoom-in maps and images Inbuilt dictionary for quick referencing The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet Pocket Abu Dhabi , a colorful, easy-to-use, and handy guide that literally fits in your pocket, provides on-the-go assistance for those seeking only the can't-miss experiences to maximize a quick trip experience. Looking for more extensive coverage? Check out Lonely Planet's Dubai & Abu Dhabi guide for a comprehensive look at all the region has to offer. Authors: Written and researched by Lonely Planet. About Lonely Planet: Since 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world's leading travel media company with guidebooks to every destination, an award-winning website, mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveller community. Lonely Planet covers must-see spots but also enables curious travellers to get off beaten paths to understand more of the culture of the places in which they find themselves.

Top 10 Dubai & Abu Dhabi


Author: Lara Dunston,Sarah Monaghan
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0756630576
Category: Travel
Page: 128
View: 8814

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Discusses lodging, dining, and entertainment in Dubai and Abu Dhabi, along with information on trip planning, security, and shopping.

Pocket Dubai


Author: Lonely Planet,Josephine Quintero
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781741798227
Category: Travel
Page: 160
View: 2903

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Get straight to the heart of the city's top sights. The city's must see sights plus expert advice to make your trip even better. Discover how to unlock the city with guides to areas that the locals really love. We've found the best walks, food, spas, shopping, beaches, nightlife and more. Includes pull out city map! Also includes maps for every neighbourhood, walking tours, and day planners.

Oman, UAE & Arabian Peninsula


Author: Jenny Walker,Stuart Butler,Andrea Schulte-Peevers,Iain Shearer
Publisher: Lonely Planet
ISBN: 1741791456
Category: Travel
Page: 580
View: 6209

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Nobody knows the Arabian Peninsula like Lonely Planet. Whether it's exploring the alleyways of Old Muscat, bargaining in Abu Dhabi's atmospheric souqs, diving in the Red Sea or finding the best spot for a desert safari, we bring you the most extensive coverage of the region. Lonely Planet guides are written by experts who get to the heart of every destination they visit. This fully updated edition is packed with accurate, practical and honest advice, designed to give you the information you need to make the most of your trip. In This Guide: In-depth advice on safe travel in the region Expat chapter packed with insider tips from our resident author Only guidebook to cover every country in the Arabian Peninsula

Lonely Planet Oman, UAE & Arabian Peninsula


Author: Lonely Planet,Jenny Walker,Anthony Ham,Andrea Schulte-Peevers
Publisher: Lonely Planet
ISBN: 1786573059
Category: Travel
Page: N.A
View: 1773

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Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher Lonely Planet Oman, UAE & Arabian Peninsula is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Explore ancient souqs in labyrinthine alleyways; dine in the world's tallest building; and feel the allure of Arabia's desert dunes; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of Oman, the United Arab Emirates and the Arabian Peninsula and begin your journey now! Inside Lonely Planet Oman, UAE & Arabian Peninsula: Colour maps and images throughout Highlights and itineraries help you tailor your trip to your personal needs and interests Insider tips to save time and money and get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spots Essential info at your fingertips - hours of operation, phone numbers, websites, transit tips, prices Honest reviews for all budgets - eating, sleeping, sight-seeing, going out, shopping, hidden gems that most guidebooks miss Cultural insights give you a richer, more rewarding travel experience - culture, history, religion, art, literature, music, dance, architecture, politics, cuisine Over 70 maps Covers Bahrain, Manama, Kuwait, Kuwait City, Oman, Muscat, Dhofar, Qatar, Doha, Saudi Arabia, Riyadh, the United Arab Emirates, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Al Gharbia and more eBook Features: (Best viewed on tablet devices and smartphones) Downloadable PDF and offline maps prevent roaming and data charges Effortlessly navigate and jump between maps and reviews Add notes to personalise your guidebook experience Seamlessly flip between pages Bookmarks and speedy search capabilities get you to key pages in a flash Embedded links to recommendations' websites Zoom-in maps and images Inbuilt dictionary for quick referencing The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet Oman, UAE & Arabian Peninsula, our most comprehensive guide to Oman, the United Arab Emirates and the Arabian Peninsula, is perfect for both exploring top sights and taking roads less travelled. Looking for a guide focused on Dubai and Abu Dhabi? Check out Lonely Planet Dubai & Abu Dhabi for a comprehensive look at all Dubai and Abu Dhabi have to offer, or Pocket Dubai, a handy-sized guide focused on the can't-miss sights for a quick trip. Looking for more extensive coverage? Check out Lonely Planet Middle East for a comprehensive look at all the region has to offer. Authors: Written and researched by Lonely Planet. About Lonely Planet: Since 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world's leading travel media company with guidebooks to every destination, an award-winning website, mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveller community. Lonely Planet covers must-see spots but also enables curious travellers to get off beaten paths to understand more of the culture of the places in which they find themselves.

Frommer's Dubai and Abu Dhabi Day by Day


Author: Gavin Thomas
Publisher: Frommermedia
ISBN: 9781628872422
Category: Travel
Page: 184
View: 568

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Frommer’s books aren’t written by committee, or by travel writers who simply pop in briefly to a destination and then consider the job done. We employ the best experts to author our guides, like Gavin Thomas who has been reporting on Dubai since it was just a forest of construction cranes. He’s the author of this innovative guide that combines maps, photos and detailed itineraries to help visitors plan their time in the most efficient way possible. The book covers the best of Dubai & Abu Dhabi in one, two, or three days, thematic tours for every interest, schedule, and taste (including Arabian heritage tours and day trips to Sharjah, Al Ain and Hatta), hundreds of evocative photos, bulleted maps that show you how to go from place to place, candid reviews of hotels, restaurants, shopping, and nightlife for all budgets, and a tear-resistant foldout map -- enclosed in a handy plastic wallet you can also use for tickets and souvenirs.

Culture Shock! United Arab Emirates


Author: Gina L. Crocetti,Gina Crocetti Benesh
Publisher: Graphic Arts Books
ISBN: 9781558683006
Category: Culture shock
Page: 204
View: 5939

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Whether you travel for business, pleasure, or a combination of the two, the ever-popular "Culture Shock!" series belongs in your backpack or briefcase. Get the nuts-and-bolts information you need to survive and thrive wherever you go. "Culture Shock!" country guides are easy-to-read, accurate, and entertaining crash courses in local customs and etiquette. "Culture Shock!" practical guides offer the inside information you need whether you're a student, a parent, a globetrotter, or a working traveler. Each "Culture Shock!" title is written by someone who's lived and worked in the country, and each is packed with practical, accurate, and enjoyable information to help you find your way and feel at home.

Pocket Rough Guide Dubai


Author: Rough Guides
Publisher: Rough Guides UK
ISBN: 0241291518
Category: Travel
Page: 136
View: 2113

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The Pocket Rough Guide to Dubai is the ideal companion to a short break in one of the world's most exciting cities. Full-colour throughout, the guide's stunning photography and useful maps will help you navigate the city's many attractions, with handpicked listings to help you find the best places to sleep, eat and shop. The Pocket Rough Guide to Dubai will also help you to scratch below the surface of the modern city to discover its traditional souks and heritage houses - as well as where to find the best beaches and the most memorable experiences. The guide also includes information on Abu Dhabi, perfect if you're planning to travel further in the UAE during your trip. Make the most of your trip with the Pocket Rough Guide to Dubai.

A Diamond in the Desert

Behind the Scenes in Abu Dhabi, the World's Richest City
Author: Jo Tatchell
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
ISBN: 0802196179
Category: Travel
Page: 304
View: 5560

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Jo Tatchell first arrived in the city of Abu Dhabi as a child in 1974, when the discovery of oil was quickly turning a small fishing town into a growing international community. More than thirty years later, change has reached breakneck pace: Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, is becoming a dizzying metropolis of ten-lane highways and overlapping languages, and its riches and emphasis on cultural development have thrust it into the international spotlight. In A Diamond in the Desert, Tatchell returns to Abu Dhabi and goes on the hunt for the story behind the headlines—retracing old steps, planting new ones, and searching for clues to mysteries that have never left her. She finds more than she bargained for—a glimpse into a city that, before it meets a patiently waiting world, must first better get to know itself. Abu Dhabi has a story to hide, and life there carries countless contradictions. The city is a tolerant melting-pot of cultures and faiths, but less than 7,000 of its 800,000 native residents are deemed eligible to vote by the ruling class and the nation’s president holds absolute veto power over his advisory boards and councils. The Emirates boast one of the world’s highest GDP per capita, but the poor distribution of wealth in its cities is staggering. Abu Dhabi’s royal family, worth an estimated $500 billion, lives off the sweat of the city’s migrant workers, who subject themselves to danger and poverty under barely-observed labor laws. But now, the city is making an international splash with a showy investment in tourism, arts and culture, perhaps signaling a change to a more open, tolerant state. A new film studio is sprouting up in Abu Dhabi, and the year 2013 will bring a new branch of the Louvre and a Guggenheim museum designed by Frank Gehry. But can Abu Dhabi truly commit to a new era of liberty after so many years of control? As this sparkling city surges into the future, it devotes just as much energy to concealing its past. Tatchell’s exploration of Abu Dhabi’s history takes her to the edge of the Empty Quarter and on a wild goose chase around the city she once thought she knew, and her often-fruitless visits to newspaper archives in search of coverage of an old story reveal the city’s desperation to hush up bad news. She seeks out friends old and new, local and expat, and discovers that word of mouth delivers more of the picture than do scattered news clippings. Along the way, she probes unknown aspects of Abu Dhabian history and culture—its ancient system of tribal organization, the condition of the city’s million foreign workers, the emergence of women in Emirati society—that might somehow explain the complexity and contradiction of life there. But Tatchell’s journey is nothing if not personal. Every turn she makes in the present conjures experiences from her past: the news that the offshore Saadiyat Island will house the city’s new museums evokes childhood camping trips there, while a reunion with a friend reminds her of their younger days partying in nightclubs and apartments dripping with riches. Memories of a young girl’s disappearance and a local’s gruesome death haunt her, but both mysteries have gone unsolved. Where Abu Dhabi wants to hide its scars, Tatchell can’t help but uncover them. Tatchell takes us on a tour of the city with an outlook that’s part native, part critic, part wide-eyed traveler. The result is a truly original collage of perspectives and images, from a regal expatriate whose husband was one of the first Brits to settle in Abu Dhabi to young Emirati artists celebrating their newfound freedom of expression. A compelling piece of history told with an intimate narrative voice, A Diamond in the Desert is an eye-opening and often haunting perspective on just how much this fascinating city has changed—and, for better or for worse, how much it has stayed the same. CHAPTER-BY-CHAPTER OUTLINE: Prologue • The year is 1965, years before the explosion of the economies of the United Arab Emirates: Longtime partners and friends Edward Henderson, a British Political Officer and supervisor of the blossoming oil trade, and Zayed bin Sultan al Nahyan, a member of the royal family and ruler of the Eastern Region, meet among the dunes of the sparsely populated Eastern Region outside of Abu Dhabi. • Henderson has taught Zayed the ways of Western business, while Zayed has opened the doors of his complex, closeted world to Henderson. • Zayed, unique within the royal family, holds a modern vision for Abu Dhabi, which at that time has only a fishing and date-farming economy. Zayed imagines a glittering, prosperous city here on the Persian Gulf. Chapter 1 – The Final Disillusionment • In the present time, Tatchell touches down in Abu Dhabi, more than thirty years after she first arrived. Recently her brother, Bill, mentioned over the phone the plans to open branches of the Guggenheim and Louvre museums on the islet of Saadiyat, where the Tatchells camped as children; the move signals a shift—perhaps toward a more open, tolerant Islamic state—for Abu Dhabi, which has never prioritized high culture. • The Tatchells were one of many expatriate families there: When Mr. Tatchell took a job managing a catering/supermarket company in 1974 (Jo is three), oil interest had begun to change the city from a from tiny seaside village to asphalt roads and UAE currency in the early ‘70s. • After attending boarding school and university in the UK, Tatchell returns to Abu Dhabi, but is eventually repelled by the injustice of the city’s wealth distribution and the indolence of its rich and returns to London in 1993. • Her two returns to Abu Dhabi, both in the ‘90s and the present, remind Tatchell of Wilfred Thesiger, a British explorer who, like T.E. Lawrence before him, embraced the discipline and loyalty of desert life when he first spent arrived in the ‘40s. When he returned in the ‘70s, he was disgusted by the indolence that oil and labor imported from the Indian sub-continent had brought on the people he loved; he called the new Abu Dhabi his “final disillusionment.” • Abu Dhabi’s complex political structure features Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed al Nahyan (Khalifa), who as president of the UAE and leader of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi possesses veto power over a number of councils and advisory groups. The UAE’s 40-member Federal National Council is the only part of the government that incorporates the public, and hardly: 20 members are appointed by UAE rulers, and the remaining 20 are elected by voters effectively appointed by the rulers as well (only 6,689 of 800,000 Emiratis are eligible voters). • The government’s Plan Abu Dhabi 2030 sets out a 25-year strategy for the city’s development, promising “ongoing access to the desert, sea and natural assets that are integral to our national identity, while building a global capital with its own rich cultural heritage.” • The Sheik’s father and predecessor, Zayed bin Sultan al Nahyan, remains a beloved figure after his death in 2004. His were the last instincts toward a conservative approach to development; in the four years since, there has been more construction than there was in the previous forty. Chapter 2 – Write the Bad News in Sand • The Abu Dhabi of Tatchell’s youth is a secretive city where news of crime and scandal is passed by word of mouth; a new newspaper, the National, tries to paint an honest picture, but old habits of secrecy die hard. • One incident has haunted Tatchell since her childhood: an English girl disappeared in a flash playing in front of her house. No one saw her vanish or found any traces of her, and the incident took on the quality of myth as the speculation since has taken place only in whispers. • The incident inspires Tatchell to hunt for the truth and better understand the city that, despite the time she has spent there, remains full of mysteries, but her trip to the city’s Cultural Foundation yields a fruitless search for the newspaper archive; Oil and Gas Journal and Gulf Business magazines are displayed in the reading room instead. Chapter 3 – Father of the Gazelle • Tribes, each led by one ruling sheikh, have been the primary mode of political organization in the Emirates for centuries; the Bani Yas tribe originally settled inland around the Liwa crescent of oases and eventually founded Abu Dhabi on the coast to the north. • Tatchell and her old friend Safwan drive out to the Liwa—they travel in Safwan’s brand-new BMW where as children they would have come by camel—and discuss Abu Dhabi’s religious openness compared to its similarly Islamic neighbor Saudi Arabia: churches dot the city, and Hindus and Buddhists are free to worship. Safwan left Abu Dhabi to study in the US, but has come back to stay, finding Tatchell through Facebook. • The Liwa, once nothing but desert on the edge of the Empty Quarter where Tatchell used to camp under the stars on family vacations, is now home to a lively new town of 30,000 people and includes a strip mall, a KFC, and a luxurious hotel that offers Abu Dhabi expats a weekend escape. Beyond the town stretch almost a million square miles of sand—the greatest expanse of dunes on earth. Chapter 4 – The End of Empire • Long before the discovery of oil, the Arabian Peninsula had been a prize for colonial powers like Britain and France because of its status as an “imperial frontier,” a passage to trade with India. • Pearls quickly became the target of foreign interest on the coast; cultures ranging from the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans to the Chinese to Renaissance Europeans had prized them. • In 1853, the coastal tribes make peace with each other for the first time and come to be known as the Trucial Sheikdoms. In 1892, Britain and this group agree to the “treaty of protectorate”: Britain would protect the sheikhs from enemies, and the sheikhs would forgo contracts with other foreign powers. • In 1950, the first drilling rig is planted and would eventually reveal oil reserves, giving the region overnight importance. • At the end of WWII, Zayed was far-sighted enough to realize that the future of the region’s tribes depended on unprecedented unity. Britain’s Labour government withdrew from Abu Dhabi in 1971; on December 2 of that year, the United Arab Emirates, a new country, came into being as the merger of several of the region’s tribes. Zayed, having steered the union, was appointed president of this new nation. • When Margaret Thatcher ends education grants to students from former Commonwealth protectorate in 1980, making British university prohibitively expensive, the US becomes the desired destination for Middle Eastern teenagers looking for degrees in marketing and engineering. Chapter 5 – Grande Dame • Tatchell visits the home of Jocelyn Henderson, the widow of British diplomat Edward Henderson. When Edward first arrived in 1948 as a member of the military, the city had only shanty homes—no running water, roads or schools. He later resigned from the military and returned to work for Iraq Petroleum Company, and his knowledge of the region and its people made him an essential advisor and negotiator. • Jocelyn reminisces about the earliest days of her husband’s relationship with Zayed, and the talent he had for settling disputes and gaining the trust of tribes beyond his own. Edward saw in Zayed the early signs of greatness, and when Zayed took over as leader of the newly formed Emirates, Edward went to work for him. Chapter 6 – I Against My Brother • The dark side of the region’s tribal system is rampant violence within and between families--even the reign of the al Nahyan family has featured a forty-year run of fratricide. • An Arab saying captures this use of violence for survival: “I against my brother, I and my brother against our cousin, my brother and our cousin against the neighbors, all of us against the foreigner.” • After the discovery of oil, Shakhbut (Zayed’s brother and predecessor) resisted development; the early ‘60s brought the first post office and telephone system, but Shakhbut put a ban on construction in 1961. • A peaceful and British-supervised transfer of power from Shakhbut to Zayed occurs in 1966 after Shakhbut’s refusal to move forward with Emirate development frustrates local citizens and Brits alike. Zayed knows there is no choice but to embrace the discovery of oil and the stability it would bring his poor region: he brought his people “from the desert to the world.” Chapter 7 – And Then There Was Oil • In the 1950s and ‘60s, development surges under Zayed and oil is first discovered in 1958. Scientists, oil executives, construction workers and engineers pour in from abroad, and caterpillar diggers roll across the sand to build homes for the influx of talent. Still, it was important to Zayed to retain the humility that came with faith and respect for the Koran. • Cranes become, and remain, a fixture of the Abu Dhabi landscape; the skyline is the most up-to-date picture of the latest construction ventures. • Environmentalists express concern about development’s drain on natural resources; the people of Abu Dhabi, and of the UAE overall, use more energy per capita than anyone else on earth. The coastline, its coral reefs, and its wildlife are endangered by constant construction. Chapter 8 – The Unseen Hand • Censorship has loosened since Tatchell’s childhood, when bare shoulders and legs were blacked out of magazine ads, but persists in more serious forms: media laws make it a crime to criticize the government, with jail time or a fine as punishment. • In the ‘70s, bad news like the English girl’s disappearance was also kept out of the press, away from foreign investors; crimes were only reported once the perpetrator had been caught and the police could be commended. Tatchell isn’t sure that papers have changed; they’re filled with business deals, not with serious crimes. • After her unsuccessful visit to the Cultural Foundation, Tatchell makes another stop in her ongoing search for a national archive, this time at Al Ittihad, an Arabic-language newspaper. The director there has little to offer but the phone number of yet another place, but Tatchell is thrilled by the possibility of uncovering some evidence of the city’s past. • Historical documents, sent to Tatchell by a British friend, reveal how close the U.S. came to declaring war on Abu Dhabi, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait in 1973, when these countries imposed oil sanctions in response to the U.S. support of Arab enemy Israel. Chapter 9 – The Pearly King • Tatchell visits Abdullah Masaood, one of Abu Dhabi’s most prominent businessmen and her father’s former partner. • Abdullah’s business empire, which includes car manufacturing, farming, jewelry and travel, has the land to build a new luxury beachfront development, but the government has halted him in hopes of using it for yet another highway for the city’s chaotic traffic. His manner is so calming that it is easy to forget his status in Abu Dhabi and his almost unimaginable wealth. • In thinking about the city’s forward-looking plans with Abdullah, Tatchell reflects on the nearby examples of Dubai and Saudi Arabia: both are floundering after years of over-expansion and bad debt. Abu Dhabi’s 2030 plan strategically avoids these mistakes. • Native Abu Dhabians count for only 20 percent of the local population. Abdullah, whose wife is English and whose son’s wife is American, is living proof of the global exchange in which Abu Dhabians are now active participants: “The younger generation parties in Beirut, dresses in the catwalk collections of Paris, hires Filipina nannies to raise their children, summers on the Riviera and winters in Switzerland.” Chapter 10 – The Next Generation • Tatchell’s seemingly futile search to find Abu Dhabian public records from before 1980 continues: the one lead she had at the National Archive refers her back to the Cultural Foundation, where she began. • Michael, the brother of an old friend, drives Tatchell around the city and describes his daring business venture: a film studio that, only two years old, is already one of the largest in the conservative Middle East. • The unexpected news that Michael’s sister, Tatchell’s friend Elizabeth Donnellan, will be arriving the next day in Abu Dhabi sends Tatchell racing back through memories of her second stint in the city, after university. • On one disturbing night out with Elizabeth, 21-year-old Tatchell visits an apartment boasting outrageous wealth with a panther and gazelle as house pets. But a bizarre, violent video that the host puts on for his guests’ diversion, depicting an unknown girl’s accidental death on her spring break, has haunted Tatchell since. She realizes that some members of the younger generation, high on Western trends, have “the uninterested countenance only huge amounts of money can bring.” Chapter 11 – The Song Remains the Same • Reunited after almost 20 years, Tatchell and Elizabeth discuss Abu Dhabi as a place that discourages settling down; Elizabeth, single at 36, laments the end of an intense love she enjoyed there. • For all its tolerance, the city did not allow expatriates to become citizens or own property until 2005. • In a nightclub the two women visit, Tatchell discovers when “Thriller” comes on that the celebrity to whom Abu Dhabians most relate is Michael Jackson—“a kid with too much money and nothing to spend it on.” • The two compare informal clusters of men in the nightclub to the ancient tribal custom of the majlis—a group of tribal leaders who welcomed guests to discuss the issues of the day. The tradition has persisted in Abu Dhabi, but folded in more outsiders as business and culture have demanded. The custom is built not on contracts, but on personal bonds. Chapter 12 – We Also Set Them Free • At lunch at Abdullah Masaood’s house, Tatchell is reminded that his family and those like it possessed slaves until the practice was outlawed in 1971. Slavery differed slightly in the Arab world in that slaves were often well protected and, in some cases, an extension of the family. Afro-Emiratis remain a testament to the area’s collision of cultures. • Today, Asian servants have taken their place, primarily rearing children. • Migrant workers, who work in the construction and maintenance of this most lavish of cities, face hazardous conditions. Laborers building or washing windows atop the city’s many skyscrapers teeter on scaffolding and wire without protection; accidents are frequent. • A disturbing gap exists between promises made and observable progress on human-rights. Emiratis’ lack of curiosity and outrage about their country’s poor human-rights record slows the efforts of outside organizations to intervene, though persuading Frank Ghery, the architect of the Abu Dhabi Guggenheim, to insist on better labor standards for construction workers on his building proved successful. In general, conflicts of interest, pursuit of profit and the view that workers possess choice all hamper change. • Tatchell pays a visit to Georgina, an Indian woman once her father’s personal assistant, now a thriving professional. The sacrifices she made in living so far from her homeland have paid off in finding an Indian community and raising a happy, prospering family in Abu Dhabi. Chapter 13 – Don’t Bury the Moon • Tatchell continues her search for public records at the National Media Council, housed inside the Ministry of Culture, Youth and Community. It has replaced the Federal Ministry of Information and Cultural, known for its heavy-handed monitoring of print, radio and television. • The Ministry of Culture is just another apparent dead end in Tatchell’s research. • At last, Tatchell finds the only explicit acknowledgement of the English girl’s kidnapping in a 1979 BBC program called The Oilman’s Wife, on the lives of expatriate women: one woman interviewed says that “One or two things have happened here and it isn’t…safe to let the children out anymore.” • A friend of Tatchell’s parents confirms the government’s choice to look the other way on expatriate affairs: “We just weren’t that important...we were there on the basis that we wouldn’t upset the status quo.” • Many versions of the English girl’s fate have circulated: Tatchell’s father believes she was found two decades later, alive and well in Pakistan, others say she was found dead and the police hushed it up. Tatchell reflects on the effect of Abu Dhabi’s hush-hush approach to bad news: “when nothing is written down, the past becomes mutable.” Chapter 14 – The Astronaut’s Wife • Tatchell hears the story of a Filipina beauty technician, who enjoys the freedom to work that she is afforded here. She dreads retirement—it is expensive to stay in Abu Dhabi, but would live under the thumb of family in the Philippines or her husband’s native Syria. • Elizabeth introduces Tatchell to Reem, a charming, brazen young woman whose villa is yet another example of the city’s stunning wealth. • Tatchell traces the path to the Abu Dhabian woman’s current state as a largely indolent creature who, finding real work impossible due to cultural restrictions, become slaves to fashion and body image; under the tribal system decades earlier, women were merchants, mothers, farmers and defenders of the tribe in their husbands’ absence. • Local fortune-teller Amina is a Soviet woman who, like many of her countrywomen, came to the Emirates in the 1960s after marrying a UAE astronaut trained in the USSR—promised wealth and comfort, she discovered that a sand-blown tent was her home. • Partying at Reem’s, Tatchell’s circle discovers that their alcohol supply has run dry. The girls’ covert trip reveals a back-alley black market; with a liquor license most expats can buy alcohol; nationals are not permitted a drop. Chapter 15 – “I Am Not My Country” • Meeting Reem’s fourteen-year-old niece Zain, who does not learn Arabic at her local school, reminds Tatchell of the threats on the region’s tribal heritage: traditional songs, cuisine, stories and dialects are all dying out. • The government seems to have recognized this: 2008 was designated the year of National Identity in the Emirates, and a conference on Emirati culture was organized in Abu Dhabi. The aim was to “inspire an idea of the modern Emirati people.” Given the government’s sensitivity toward criticism, this public debate was a significant break with tradition. • Still, there is no way to reconcile Abu Dhabi’s desire to grow into a city of 3 million by 2030 with its need to establish a stronger balance between nationals and outsiders. This feeling permeates the UAE: Dubai’s chief of police was quoted as saying “I’m afraid we are building towers but losing the Emirates.” • Tatchell reflects that Abu Dhabi lacks the engrained history that true civilizations require: it moves ever forward, but does it ever look back? The past, she thinks, is “an embarrassing reminder of the struggles, the poverty and their insignificance.” • Abdulla al Amri, the director of the Cultural Foundation, introduces Tatchell to the idea of “Middle Islam,” a progressive interpretation of Islam founded on pragmatism and a belief in dialogue and courtesy—the Koranic message remade for modern times. The government insists that all must be free to worship in their own way. • A gaping chasm exists between the wealthy Abu Dhabi elite, who buy up English football clubs as displays of wealth, and regular citizens; sooner, or later, Tatchell suspects, this lower class will no longer feel their true values are represented by their monarchy. Chapter 16 – Women, Insha’Allah • Tatchell learns that Jocelyn Henderson has been teaching local history to a group of female undergraduates from Sheikh Zayed University; the students can’t believe the great changes their country has undergone. • Education reform in Abu Dhabi is urgent: public school teachers are paid about $600 a month, and there are no female Emirati professors. • Still, more women graduate from university in Abu Dhabi than men, and the city boasts one of the highest percentages of female graduates in the world. • Sheik Zayed’s wife, Sheikha Fatima, was a driving force behind women’s education. In 1972, she founded the Abu Dhabi Women’s Association (an autonomous body, with its own budget, dedicated to improving education and professional opportunities for women). Three years later, she united the women’s associations of the seven Emirates to create the UAE Women’s Federation. • Today, women occupy powerful positions around the Emirates, including nine representatives out of forty in the Federal National Council, the UAE’s elected advisory body. • Still, family obligations come first, and even Fatima said publicly in 2003 that a woman’s freedom to pursue her career, while essential, should not interfere with the duties of motherhood. Chapter 17 – Island of Happiness • Tatchell visits Saadiyat, an island just off Abu Dhabi and about half its size, future home to the Guggenheim and Louvre branches and other development projects. The state has been trying to find a good use for the land for more than twenty years, and now Saadiyat is being cast as the site for Abu Dhabi’s new cultural center. • By e-mail, Tatchell’s brother Bill recounts an incident that she suspects has kept him from returning to Abu Dhabi: on a sunny 1994 afternoon boating off Saadiyat with their father, Bill witnessed a hit-and-run between a huge Australian boat and a local fishing boat. Bill tries to help, but is unable to save a national who dies among the wreckage. • The local police hush up the incident and Bill leaves Abu Dhabi; haunted by his failure to help and the lack of proper procedure and disclosure, he has never spoken of it. Bill’s involvement, combined with the gap between the local and expatriate communities, meant that he could be implicated at any time despite his connections. His paranoia about the local government’s desire to present its own version of events became too much to bear. • Tatchell’s return to the Centre for Documentation and Research to dig deeper into the story leads her to a tiny newspaper piece that contains none of the accident’s violent details; as with the myth of the English girls’ disappearance, it’s clear to her that “there is a world above and a world beneath...public and private were not designed to mix.” The gap between Bill’s memory and the presented version of events is unsettling, and there is no access for an outsider. Today, Tatchell knows, “nothing has changed.” • The plight of neighbor Dubai is one bad story that has made headlines: tens of billions of dollars in debt, the once-thriving city is said to have gone to Abu Dhabi for aid. Dubai’s misfortune is Abu Dhabi’s great opportunity: the more conservative capital can secure regional dominance and global reputation. Some locals speculate that “Dubai will soon be a suburb of Abu Dhabi.” Chapter 18 – The New Islamic Golden Age • Abu Dhabi’s Emirates Palace hotel, which cost the government $3 billion to build, hosts the Emirati Expressions exhibition, a glitzy showcase of modern Emirati artists organized by the Tourist Development and Investment Corporation and aimed at preparing locals for the arrival of the Guggenheim and Louvre. • The art exhibition seems another place in Abu Dhabi where, for the first time, firmly established codes are open to interpretation: portraits, long forbidden by Islam for their implicit challenge of God’s ownership of the act of creation, represent a large number of the works. • Tatchell’s artist friend Wasel shares his aesthetic idea of “UAE-ism”: the diversity and sense of contradiction that dominate the consciousness in Abu Dhabi and gives birth to art there. The idea stems from the challenge that UAE artists face in trying to incorporate elements of Western modernity with their own vision of their homeland and the myriad questions this combination raises. • Tatchell writes that Abu Dhabi has reached the limits of consumption and realized that oil will never create respectability; Abu Dhabi has thus turned its attention to the new frontier of intellectual and cultural empire. • Tatchell visits Abdulla al Amri to discuss the city’s choice to develop high culture; Al Amri attributes the decision to Sheikh Mohammed, President Khalifa’s half brother and the Emirates’ crown prince. • Mohammed, observing that history’s great civilizations were also beacons of learning and ideas, wants to ignite a second “Islamic Golden Age” of art and culture to bring international esteem to Abu Dhabi; the first, in the 11th and 12th centuries, united scholars across faiths and prioritized liberal thinking over religious dogma. • The West needs Abu Dhabi to triumph in this more liberal, open state because of the threat we feel from the aggressive fundamentalism of nearby nations like Iran and Saudi Arabia. • Where the tiny country can not gain power through force, it may gain it through public initiatives that present the voices of citizens. Events like Emirati Expressions demonstrate that, for the first time after years of control, the state is turning to its people and asking for ideas. • Still, Tatchell suggests that change will be slow: Abu Dhabi’s deeply engrained priority of the community over the individual means that learning about liberty through theory or art will not overturn the existing system, even as it improves the lives of many of its citizens. • If this experiment works, it will be because Abu Dhabi leads with its ancient, tribal spirit of determination and diplomacy over glitz and glamour. Most of all, Abu Dhabi must shed the social hypocrisy of proclaiming itself a cultural, intellectual capital while restricting communication and unfairly treating its most vulnerable.

The Rough Guide to Dubai


Author: Gavin Thomas
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1409349780
Category: Travel
Page: 224
View: 9538

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Now available in ePub format. This second edition of The Rough Guide to Dubai is the ultimate companion to the world's most exciting tourist destination. Read expert coverage on everything from traditional souks to state-of-the-art tourist attractions, beautiful beaches to "seven-star" hotels, with up-to-date listings of all the hottest places to stay, eat, drink, and shop. An inspirational full-color introduction highlights the best of the city, while subsequent full-color sections reveal the incredible contrasts between traditional and futuristic Dubai. The Rough Guide to Dubai features the latest developments to Dubai Marina and the Palm Jumeirah, as well as day-trips throughout the United Arab Emirates, including Sharajah, Al Ain, the East Coast, and ambitious Abu Dhabi. Comprehensive maps throughout help you find your way around the region. Make the most of your time with The Rough Guide to Dubai.

How to Be A Travel Writer


Author: Lonely Planet,Don George
Publisher: Lonely Planet
ISBN: 1787010007
Category: Travel
Page: 272
View: 8159

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Bursting with invaluable advice, this inspiring and practical guide, fully revised and updated in this new edition, is a must for anyone who yearns to write about travel - whether they aspire to make their living from it or simply enjoy jotting in a journal for posterity. You don't have to make money to profit from travel writing. Sometimes, the richest rewards are in the currency of experience. How to be a Travel Writer reveals the varied possibilities that travel writing offers and inspires all travellers to take advantage of those opportunities. That's where the journey begins - where it takes you is up to you. Let legendary travel writer Don George show you the way with his invaluable tips on: The secrets of crafting a great travel story How to conduct pre-trip and on-the-road research Effective interviewing techniques How to get your name in print (and money in your bank account) Quirks of writing for newspapers, magazines, online and books Extensive listings of writers' resources and industry organisations Interviews with established writers, editors and agents About Lonely Planet: Started in 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world's leading travel guide publisher with guidebooks to every destination on the planet, as well as an award-winning website, a suite of mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveller community. Lonely Planet's mission is to enable curious travellers to experience the world and to truly get to the heart of the places they find themselves in. TripAdvisor Travelers' Choice Awards 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016 winner in Favorite Travel Guide category 'Lonely Planet guides are, quite simply, like no other.' - New York Times 'Lonely Planet. It's on everyone's bookshelves; it's in every traveller's hands. It's on mobile phones. It's on the Internet. It's everywhere, and it's telling entire generations of people how to travel the world.' - Fairfax Media (Australia) Note: The digital edition of this book is missing some of the images found in the physical edition

The Rough Guide to Dubai


Author: Rough Guides
Publisher: Rough Guides UK
ISBN: 0241298644
Category: Travel
Page: 232
View: 6132

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The Rough Guide to Dubai is the ultimate travel guide to one of the world's most exciting cities. Discover Dubai's highlights with stunning photography, colour-coded maps, handpicked listings and in-depth coverage of all the attractions. You'll find detailed practical advice on what to see and do - from going up the world's tallest building or taking afternoon tea in the iconic Burj al Arab to exploring the traditional souks and heritage houses of Deira and Bur Dubai - as well as honest reviews of all the best hotels, restaurants, bars and shops in every price range, from seven-star palaces to cutprice curry houses. Whether you have time to browse detailed chapters or need fast-fix itineraries and lists of top sights and attractions, The Rough Guide to Dubai has everything you need for a perfect trip. Make the most of your trip with The Rough Guide to Dubai.

Fodor's Dubai 25 Best


Author: Fodor's
Publisher: Fodor's
ISBN: 9781101879382
Category: Travel
Page: 128
View: 7459

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Compact and affordable, Fodor's Dubai 25 Best is a great travel companion for travelers who want a light, easy-to-pack guidebook to one of the most exciting cities in the Middle East. DISCERNING RECOMMENDATIONS: Fodor's Dubai 25 Best offers savvy advice and recommendations to help travelers make the most of their visit, providing great places to shop, eat, sleep, and drink for every budget. GORGEOUS PHOTOS AND MAPS: Full-color pictures and full-size street maps cover the best Dubai has to offer, all in an easy-to-use package. A handy, weather-resistant city map provides added value, giving travelers essential information so they can travel with confidence. INDISPENSABLE TRIP-PLANNING TOOLS: Save time and space by having Dubai's top 25 sights and experiences in one convenient guidebook. Neighborhood walks show off the best of the city with self-guided tour ideas. Plan excursions outside the city with the Farther Afield section. PRACTICAL TIPS AND PHRASES: Travel like a local with our Need to Know section, filled with useful travel tips and essential Arabic phrases. ABOUT FODOR'S AUTHORS: Each Fodor's travel guide is researched and written by local experts.

Lonely Planet Philippines


Author: Lonely Planet,Paul Harding,Greg Bloom,Celeste Brash,Michael Grosberg,Iain Stewart
Publisher: Lonely Planet
ISBN: 178701892X
Category: Travel
Page: N.A
View: 7393

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#1 best-selling guide to the Philippines* Lonely Planet Philippines is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Swim at secluded beaches in the Bacuit Archipelago, take part in a colourful fiesta, dive remote reefs and magnificent walls at Apo Island or Balicasag; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of the Philippines and begin your journey now! Inside Lonely Planet Philippines Travel Guide: Colour maps and images throughout Highlights and itineraries help you tailor your trip to your personal needs and interests Insider tips to save time and money and get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spots Essential info at your fingertips - hours of operation, phone numbers, websites, transit tips, prices Honest reviews for all budgets - eating, sleeping, sight-seeing, going out, shopping, hidden gems that most guidebooks miss Cultural insights give you a richer, more rewarding travel experience - history, etiquette, people, culture, politics, environmental issues, landscapes, wildlife, cuisine. Over 90 maps Covers Manila, Corregidor, Luzon, Zambales Coast, Lingayen Gulf, Ilocos, the Cordillera, Batanes, Bicol, Masbate, Catanduanes, Marinduque, Mindoro, Boracay, the Visayas, Negros, Cebu, Bohol, Samar, Mindanao, Palawan and more The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet Philippines, our most comprehensive guide to the Philippines, is perfect for both exploring top sights and taking roads less travelled. Looking for more extensive coverage? Check out Lonely Planet Southeast Asia on a shoestring guide for a comprehensive look at all the region has to offer. About Lonely Planet: Since 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world's leading travel media company with guidebooks to every destination, an award-winning website, mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveller community. Lonely Planet covers must-see spots but also enables curious travellers to get off beaten paths to understand more of the culture of the places in which they find themselves. *Best-selling guide to The Philippines. Source: Nielsen BookScan. Australia, UK and USA, February 2014-January 2015

Lonely Planet Mauritius, Reunion & Seychelles


Author: Jean-Bernard Carillet,Brandon Presser
Publisher: Lonely Planet
ISBN: 1741791677
Category: Travel
Page: 356
View: 1411

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Paradise on earth? Pretty close. Laze all day on a dreamy beach, sip cocktails at sunset and feast on seafood. Or get active and hike into spectacular volcanic landscapes or dive with turtles in coral canyons. Whatever your interests and budget, this book will make your experience even more special. Lonely Planet guides are written by experts who get to the heart of every destination they visit. This fully updated edition is packed with accurate, practical and honest advice, designed to give you the information you need to make the most of your trip. In This Guide: Diving and hiking chapters for thrills above and below the water Cultural insights to enrich your experience Ecofriendly tips to help you travel green

Lonely Planet Cape Town & the Garden Route


Author: Lonely Planet,Simon Richmond,Lucy Corne
Publisher: Lonely Planet
ISBN: 1743609698
Category: Travel
Page: N.A
View: 2065

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Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher Lonely Planet Cape Town & the Garden Route is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Summit Table Mountain for panoramic views, take a boat to Robben Island, or shop and sight-see on the V&A Waterfront; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of Cape Town & the Garden Route and begin your journey now! Inside Lonely Planet Cape Town & the Garden Route: Full-colour maps and images throughout Highlights and itineraries help you tailor your trip to your personal needs and interests Insider tips to save time and money and get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spots Essential info at your fingertips - hours of operation, phone numbers, websites, transit tips, prices Honest reviews for all budgets - eating, sleeping, sight-seeing, going out, shopping, hidden gems that most guidebooks miss Cultural insights give you a richer, more rewarding travel experience - wildlife, wine, history, arts, architecture Free, convenient pull-out Cape Town map (included in print version), plus over 30 colour maps Covers City Bowl, Foreshore, Bo-Kaap, De Waterkant, Gardens, Green Point, Waterfront, Sea Point, Hourt Bay, Simon's Town, Cape Flat, the Garden Route and more eBook Features: (Best viewed on tablet devices and smartphones) Downloadable PDF and offline maps prevent roaming and data charges Effortlessly navigate and jump between maps and reviews Add notes to personalise your guidebook experience Seamlessly flip between pages Bookmarks and speedy search capabilities get you to key pages in a flash Embedded links to recommendations' websites Zoom-in maps and images Inbuilt dictionary for quick referencing The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet Cape Town & the Garden Route, our most comprehensive guide to Cape Town, is perfect for both exploring top sights and taking roads less travelled. Looking for more extensive coverage? Check out Lonely Planet South Africa, Lesotho & Swaziland for a comprehensive look at all the region has to offer. Authors: Written and researched by Lonely Planet, Simon Richmond & Lucy Corne. About Lonely Planet: Since 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world's leading travel media company with guidebooks to every destination, an award-winning website, mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveller community. Lonely Planet covers must-see spots but also enables curious travellers to get off beaten paths to understand more of the culture of the places in which they find themselves.