London

The Novel
Author: Edward Rutherfurd
Publisher: Ballantine Books
ISBN: 0307806022
Category: Fiction
Page: 1152
View: 1636

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“A TOUR DE FORCE . . . London tracks the history of the English capital from the days of the Celts until the present time. . . . Breathtaking.”—The Orlando Sentinel A master of epic historical fiction, Edward Rutherford gives us a sweeping novel of London, a glorious pageant spanning two thousand years. He brings this vibrant city's long and noble history alive through his saga of ever-shifting fortunes, fates, and intrigues of a half-dozen families, from the age of Julius Caesar to the twentieth century. Generation after generation, these families embody the passion, struggle, wealth, and verve of the greatest city in the Old World. Praise for London “Remarkable . . . The invasion by Julius Caesar’s legions in 54 B.C. . . . The rise of chivalry and the Crusades . . . The building of the Globe theatre . . . and the coming of the Industrial Revolution. . . . What a delightful way to get the feel of London and of English history. . . . We witness first-hand the lust of Henry VIII. We overhear Geoffrey Chaucer deciding to write The Canterbury Tales. . . . Each episode is a punchy tale made up of bite-size chunks ending in tiny cliffhangers.”—The New York Times “Hold-your-breath suspense, buccaneering adventure, and passionate tales of love and war.”—The Times (London) “Fascinating . . . A sprawling epic.”—San Francisco Chronicle

London

A History
Author: Francis Sheppard
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780192853691
Category: History
Page: 442
View: 2993

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London has for most of 2000 years been the hub of the political, economic, and cultural life of the British Isles. No other city has held such a dominant national position for so long. This new study, by the doyen of London historians, describes London's diverse past, from its origins as aRoman settlement at the first bridging of the Thames to the world-class metropolis it is today. It provides a vivid account of a city which was the 'deere sweete' place which Chaucer loved more than any other city on earth, which was for Dickens his 'magic lantern', and to Keats 'a great sea',howling for more wrecks. It is also a story of much contrast and remarkable resilience; through great fires and pestilence, civil war, and the Blitz, London has rebuilt and reinvented itself for each generation.

Down and Out in Paris and London


Author: George Orwell
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780547488547
Category: Fiction
Page: 228
View: 1042

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This unusual fictional account, in good part autobiographical, narrates without self-pity and often with humor the adventures of a penniless British writer among the down-and-out of two great cities. In the tales of both cities we learn some sobering Orwellian truths about poverty and society.

National Geographic London Book of Lists

The City's Best, Worst, Oldest, Greatest, and Quirkiest
Author: Tim Jepson,Larry Porges
Publisher: National Geographic Books
ISBN: 1426213859
Category: Travel
Page: 256
View: 3656

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For London lovers of all stripes, National Geographic London Book of Lists chronicles this ever-changing city from its ancient Roman origins to the present day. Organized with a minimum of organization, the 140 lists in this eclectic and hugely entertaining illustrated compendium cover the city’s best, worst, highest, smallest, first, last, and everything in-between. Among the many intriguing facts, stats, and snippets, you’ll discover: · Where you can find six old windmills within the confines of metropolitan London · Why the women’s restroom at an East End pub is especially popular with avant-garde artists · When a tornado razed nearly 600 houses and destroyed London Bridge · The address of the only London flat where the four members of the Beatles lived together · Why local children beat the stone boundaries outside the Tower of London with willow branches every three years · Where you can find London’s eight best waterfront pubs, seven greatest Victorian gin palaces, and ten most historic pubs · Which two famous London museums still show World War II bomb damage on their outer walls Royal palaces. Street markets. Stellar views. Cockney slang. Favorite meals of kings. Roman ruins. Secrets lost to time. With surprises on every page, National Geographic London Book of Lists takes you deep inside the city that never fails to fascinate. From the Hardcover edition.

London


Author: Edward Rutherfurd
Publisher: Fawcett Books
ISBN: 0449002632
Category: Fiction
Page: 1126
View: 968

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The triumphs and failures of seven individual family clans span the history of a city from the third-century Roman occupation of Londinium through such eras as the Norman conquest and the Elizabethan period

London

North
Author: Bridget Cherry,Nikolaus Pevsner
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300096538
Category: Architecture
Page: 810
View: 2837

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This volume on London architecture covers the boroughs of Barnet, Camden, Enfield, Hackney, Haringey and Islington. It gives a view of London's expansion northward from formal Georgian squares, to the hill towns of Hampstead and Highgate.

The Shows of London


Author: Richard Daniel Altick
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674807310
Category: History
Page: 553
View: 4025

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An examination of London exhibitions as they evolved from displays of relics in pre-Reformation churches, through the collections of eighteenth-century virtuosi, to the first science museums and public galleries of the mid-Victorian period illuminates English social history

London and the Culture of Homosexuality, 1885-1914


Author: Matt Cook
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521822077
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 223
View: 6804

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London and the Culture of Homosexuality explores the relationship between London and male homosexuality from the criminalization of all 'acts of gross indecency' between men in 1885 to the outbreak of the First World War in 1914 - years marked by an intensification in concern about male-male relationships and also by the emergence of an embryonic homosexual rights movement. Taking his cue from literary and lesbian and gay scholars, urban historians and cultural geographers, Matt Cook combines discussion of London's homosexual subculture and various major and minor scandals with a detailed examination of representations in the press, in science and in literature. The conjunction of approaches used in this study provides insights into the development of ideas about the modern homosexual and into the many different ways of comprehending and taking part in London's culture of homosexuality.

Quiet London


Author: Siobhan Wall
Publisher: Frances Lincoln
ISBN: 1781011893
Category: Travel
Page: 144
View: 2282

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Where can Londoners and visitors find quiet places to meet and talk? London is an exciting place to be, but not everyone wants to be in a noisy environment listening to loud music. Perhaps they want to be somewhere where they can read a book, or sit and linger for a while. Many visitors to the capital long to discover places off the beaten track - find a delightful garden to sit in or a tree-lined walk by a river. Busy Londoners are often looking for somewhere to go which is an alternative to lively venues; a place where things are understated rather than grabbing their attention... Quiet London is a guide to quiet places to meet, drink, eat, swim, rest, shop, sleep or read. It includes interesting, attractive places where people don't have to strain to hear each other speak. There are short descriptions for each venue, alongside travel and contact details and simple but atmospheric photographs in colour and black and white.

Necropolis

London and Its Dead
Author: Catharine Arnold
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1847394930
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 3332

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From Roman burial rites to the horrors of the plague, from the founding of the great Victorian cemeteries to the development of cremation and the current approach of metropolitan society towards death and bereavement -- including more recent trends to displays of collective grief and the cult of mourning, such as that surrounding the death of Diana, Princess of Wales -- NECROPOLIS: LONDON AND ITS DEAD offers a vivid historical narrative of this great city's attitude to going the way of all flesh. As layer upon layer of London soil reveals burials from pre-historic and medieval times, the city is revealed as one giant grave, filled with the remains of previous eras -- pagan, Roman, medieval, Victorian. This fascinating blend of archaeology, architecture and anecdote includes such phenomena as the rise of the undertaking trade and the pageantry of state funerals; public executions and bodysnatching. Ghoulishly entertaining and full of fascinating nuggets of information, Necropolis leaves no headstone unturned in its exploration of our changing attitudes to the deceased among us. Both anecdotal history and cultural commentary, Necropolis will take its place alongside classics of the city such as Peter Ackroyd's LONDON.

London

The City Churches
Author: Simon Bradley,Nikolaus Pevsner
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300096552
Category: Architecture
Page: 160
View: 3541

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This is a comprehensive guide to the astonishingly varied churches crowded into the square mile of Europe's financial centre, the City of London. It is also an indispensable guide and record of church architecture and parish life in the city.

London

A Musical Gazetteer
Author: Lewis Foreman,Susan Foreman
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300104028
Category: Music
Page: 371
View: 4410

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The essential companion to musical London

London in the Age of Industrialisation

Entrepreneurs, Labour Force and Living Conditions, 1700-1850
Author: L. D. Schwarz
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521403650
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 285
View: 8091

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Analyses the effects of the industrial revolution on London's working population.

Rivers of London: Black Mould #3


Author: Ben Aaronovitch,Andrew Cartmel
Publisher: Titan Comics
ISBN: 1785855077
Category: Comics & Graphic Novels
Page: 32
View: 8904

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The book store hit returns for more dark and dangerous urban fantasy! The third series in the best-selling original comic series, based on the award-wining novels by Ben Aaronovitch! p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Calibri}

Opera in London

Views of the Press, 1785-1830
Author: Theodore Fenner
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 9780809319121
Category: Music
Page: 788
View: 3627

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Theodore Fenner’s Opera in London offers a vivid portrait of the operatic and cultural life of a London under the influence of Romanticism as perceived by the English press and the public who viewed the performances. In part 1, Fenner discusses the rise of the periodical press in early nineteenth-century London and the critics of these publications who reviewed opera performances, such as Leigh Hunt and William Hazlitt. Fenner lists in the appendixes for part 1 the leading periodicals—including the Althenaeum, Examiner, and Spectator,— the critics, and reviews by leading critics. Fenner, in part 2, examines the productions of Italian opera in London at the King’s Theatre, including the problems in theatre management and financing; the varied nature of the audience; the operas and performances— those that were popular and those that failed in the words of the critics and the responses of the audience; the singers; and themes and attitudes of the period as expressed by the critics. In part 3, Fenner explores the same topics for the English operas presented at Drury Lane, Covent Garden, and other playhouses. Parts 2 and 3 also contain extensive appendixes listing seasonal and annual performances and reviews, productions by composers and by librettists, comic and serious productions, operas by known playwrights, and minor singers. Forty-eight illustrations of singers, critics, performances, composers, and theatres add to the richness of this study.

Boswell's London Journal, 1762-1763


Author: James Boswell,Frederick Albert Pottle
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300093018
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 370
View: 9209

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In 1762 James Boswell, then twenty-two years old, left Edinburgh for London. The famous Journal he kept during the next nine months is an intimate account of his encounters with the high-life and the low-life in London. Frank and confessional as a personal portrait of the young Boswell, the Journal is also revealing as a portrayal of life in eighteenth-century London. This paperback reissue includes a Foreword by Peter Ackroyd, which discusses Boswell's life and achievement.

London in the Age of Chaucer


Author: A. R. Myers
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806121116
Category: History
Page: 236
View: 1831

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Fourteenth-century London was noisy, dirty, and disorderly, but also prosperous, proud of itself, and full of life not yet dispersed to distant suburbs. It was described in 1326 as a "mirror to all England," and indeed it was. Trade was growing and the guilds were making their influence felt. If justice was not tempered with mercy, at least the law courts were open to the citizens. Fine churches, palaces, guildhalls, and other buildings were constructed, and fire laws were enacted. Sanitation was a monstrous problem, and twice during the period the Black Death wreaked its havoc, but Londoners persevered. The author deals with London life in all its varied aspects during the time of Chaucer-customs, laws, social conditions, trade, and general conduct of the city government. London was the magnet of society and fashion, a city of pollution and violence, yet a city of wealth and churches. It was also still a city where a man knew his neighbors and often even lived in the same house with his employer. As Chaucer walked the London streets, whether as a member of the royal household, as controller of the port of London, as clerk of the king's works, or simply as a resident above Aldgate, he would have met plenty of people he knew. He may well have met the originals of the prioress or the wife of Bath, the merchant or the sergeant-at-law, the physician or the summoner, or the host himself, Harry Bailey. London had enough variety, importance, and cohesion to have encompassed them all.

The London Hanged

Crime and Civil Society in the Eighteenth Century
Author: Peter Linebaugh
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 9781859846384
Category: History
Page: 492
View: 1526

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Peter Linebaugh's groundbreaking history has become an inescapable part of any understanding of the rise of capitalism. In eighteenth-century London the spectacle of a hanging served the purpose of forcing the poor population of London to accept the criminalization of customary rights and new forms of private property. In this new edition Peter Linebaugh reinforces his original arguments with detailed responses to his critics based on an impressive array of historical sources.

London, 800-1216

The Shaping of a City
Author: Christopher Nugent Lawrence Brooke,Gillian Keir
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520026865
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 424
View: 4650

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