Living Before Dying

Imagining and Remembering Home
Author: Janette Davies
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1789201306
Category: Medical
Page: 172
View: 2094

Continue Reading →

This in-depth description of life in a nursing/care home for 70 residents and 40 staff highlights the daily care of frail or ill residents between 80 and 100 years of age, including people suffering with dementia. How residents interact with care assistants is emphasised, as are the different behaviours of men and women observed during a year of daily conversations between the author, patients and staff, who share their stories of the pressures of the work. Living Before Dying shows a world where, in extreme old age, people have to learn how to cope with living communally.

Footprints in Paradise

Ecotourism, Local Knowledge, and Nature Therapies in Okinawa
Author: Andrea E. Murray
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1785333860
Category: Science
Page: 186
View: 9433

Continue Reading →

The economic imperative of sustainable tourism development frequently shapes life on small subtropical islands. In Okinawa, ecotourism promises to provide employment for a dwindling population of rural youth while preserving the natural environment and bolstering regional pride. Footprints in Paradise explores the transformation in community and sense of place as Okinawans come to view themselves through the lens of the visiting tourist consumer, and as their language, landscapes, and wildlife are reconstituted as treasured and vulnerable resources. The rediscovery and revaluing of local ecological knowledge strengthens Okinawan or Uchinaa cultural heritage, despite the controversial presence of US military bases amidst a hegemonic Japanese state.

Do Glaciers Listen?

Local Knowledge, Colonial Encounters, and Social Imagination
Author: Julie Cruikshank
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 9780774859769
Category: Social Science
Page: 328
View: 7010

Continue Reading →

Do Glaciers Listen? explores the conflicting depictions of glaciers to show how natural and cultural histories are objectively entangled in the Mount Saint Elias ranges. This rugged area, where Alaska, British Columbia, and the Yukon Territory now meet, underwent significant geophysical change in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, which coincided with dramatic social upheaval resulting from European exploration and increased travel and trade among Aboriginal peoples. European visitors brought with them varying conceptions of nature as sublime, as spiritual, or as a resource for human progress. They saw glaciers as inanimate, subject to empirical investigation and measurement. Aboriginal oral histories, conversely, described glaciers as sentient, animate, and quick to respond to human behaviour. In each case, however, the experiences and ideas surrounding glaciers were incorporated into interpretations of social relations. Focusing on these contrasting views during the late stages of the Little Ice Age (1550-1900), Cruikshank demonstrates how local knowledge is produced, rather than discovered, through colonial encounters, and how it often conjoins social and biophysical processes. She then traces how the divergent views weave through contemporary debates about cultural meanings as well as current discussions about protected areas, parks, and the new World Heritage site. Readers interested in anthropology and Native and northern studies will find this a fascinating read and a rich addition to circumpolar literature.

Ethics of Everyday Life

Moral Theology, Social Anthropology, and the Imagination of the Human
Author: Michael Banner,Michael C.. Banner
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198722060
Category: Religion
Page: 223
View: 6059

Continue Reading →

The moments in Christ's human life noted in the creeds (his conception, birth, suffering, death, and burial) are events which would likely appear in a syllabus for a course in social anthropology, for they are of special interest and concern in human life, and also sites of contention and controversy, where what it is to be human is discovered, constructed, and contested. In other words, these are the occasions for profound and continuing questioning regarding the meaning of human life, as controversies to do with IVF, abortion, euthanasia, and the use of bodies or body parts post mortem plainly indicate. Thus the following questions arise, how do the instances in Christ's life represent human life, and how do these representations relate to present day cultural norms, expectations, and newly emerging modes of relationship, themselves shaping and framing human life? How does the Christian imagination of human life, which dwells on and draws from the life of Christ, not only articulate its own, but also come into conversation with and engage other moral imaginaries of the human? Michael Banner argues that consideration of these questions requires study of moral theology, therefore, he reconceives its nature and tasks, and in particular, its engagement with social anthropology. Drawing from social anthropology and Christian thought and practice from many periods, and influenced especially by his engagement in public policy matters including as a member of the UK's Human Tissue Authority, Banner aims to develop the outlines of an everyday ethics, stretching from before the cradle to after the grave.

New Directions in Biocultural Anthropology


Author: Molly K. Zuckerman
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118962966
Category: Nature
Page: 536
View: 7788

Continue Reading →

Biocultural or biosocial anthropology is a research approach that views biology and culture as dialectically and inextricably intertwined, explicitly emphasizing the dynamic interaction between humans and their larger social, cultural, and physical environments. The biocultural approach emerged in anthropology in the 1960s, matured in the 1980s, and is now one of the dominant paradigms in anthropology, particularly within biological anthropology. This volume gathers contributions from the top scholars in biocultural anthropology focusing on six of the most influential, productive, and important areas of research within biocultural anthropology. These are: critical and synthetic approaches within biocultural anthropology; biocultural approaches to identity, including race and racism; health, diet, and nutrition; infectious disease from antiquity to the modern era; epidemiologic transitions and population dynamics; and inequality and violence studies. Focusing on these six major areas of burgeoning research within biocultural anthropology makes the proposed volume timely, widely applicable and useful to scholars engaging in biocultural research and students interested in the biocultural approach, and synthetic in its coverage of contemporary scholarship in biocultural anthropology. Students will be able to grasp the history of the biocultural approach, and how that history continues to impact scholarship, as well as the scope of current research within the approach, and the foci of biocultural research into the future. Importantly, contributions in the text follow a consistent format of a discussion of method and theory relative to a particular aspect of the above six topics, followed by a case study applying the surveyed method and theory. This structure will engage students by providing real world examples of anthropological issues, and demonstrating how biocultural method and theory can be used to elucidate and resolve them. Key features include: Contributions which span the breadth of approaches and topics within biological anthropology from the insights granted through work with ancient human remains to those granted through collaborative research with contemporary peoples. Comprehensive treatment of diverse topics within biocultural anthropology, from human variation and adaptability to recent disease pandemics, the embodied effects of race and racism, industrialization and the rise of allergy and autoimmune diseases, and the sociopolitics of slavery and torture. Contributions and sections united by thematically cohesive threads. Clear, jargon-free language in a text that is designed to be pedagogically flexible: contributions are written to be both understandable and engaging to both undergraduate and graduate students. Provision of synthetic theory, method and data in each contribution. The use of richly contextualized case studies driven by empirical data. Through case-study driven contributions, each chapter demonstrates how biocultural approaches can be used to better understand and resolve real-world problems and anthropological issues.

Sissi’s World

The Empress Elisabeth in Memory and Myth
Author: Maura E. Hametz,Heidi Schlipphacke
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1501313452
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 408
View: 4338

Continue Reading →

Sissi's World offers a transdisciplinary approach to the study of the Habsburg Empress Elisabeth of Austria. It investigates the myths, legends, and representations across literature, art, film, and other media of one of the most popular, revered, and misunderstood female figures in European cultural history. Sissi's World explores the cultural foundations for the endurance of the Sissi legends and the continuing fascination with the beautiful empress: a Bavarian duchess born in 1837, the longest-serving Austrian empress, and the queen of Hungary who died in 1898 at the hands of a crazed anarchist. Despite the continuing fascination with "the beloved Sissi," the Habsburg empress, her impact, and legacy have received scant attention from scholars. This collection will go beyond the popular biographical accounts, recountings of her mythic beauty, and scattered studies of her well-known eccentricities to offer transdisciplinary cultural perspectives across art, film, fashion, history, literature, and media.

New Directions in Economic Anthropology


Author: Susana Narotzky
Publisher: Pluto Press (UK)
ISBN: N.A
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 253
View: 624

Continue Reading →

'Narotzky is particularly compelling in her discussion of the relation between the counted andunaccounted as it enters practices and ideology in the informal economy, family business and home life' Anthropology Today (RAI)Using an historical perspective, Narotzky highlights the interdependent nature of the contemporary world economy, and includes case studies of Western societies. She gives special emphasis to current issues such as the anthropology of work, the informal economy, and the cultures of industrialisation.

A Companion to the Anthropology of Religion


Author: Janice Boddy,Michael Lambek
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119124999
Category: Social Science
Page: 584
View: 3495

Continue Reading →

A Companion to the Anthropology of Religion presents a collection of original, ethnographically–informed essays that explore the variety of beliefs, practices, and religious experiences in the contemporary world and asks how to think about religion as a subject of anthropological inquiry. Presents a collection of original, ethnographically–informed essays exploring the wide variety of beliefs, practices, and religious experiences in the contemporary world Explores a broad range of topics including the perspectivism debate, the rise of religious nationalism, reflections on religion and new media, religion and politics, and ideas of self and gender in relation to religious belief Includes examples drawn from different religious traditions and from several regions of the world Features newly–commissioned articles reflecting the most up–to–date research and critical thinking in the field, written by an international team of leading scholars Adds immeasurably to our understanding of the complex relationships between religion, culture, society, and the individual in today s world

The Interpretation of Cultures


Author: Clifford Geertz
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465093566
Category: Social Science
Page: 576
View: 8975

Continue Reading →

In The Interpretation of Cultures, the most original anthropologist of his generation moved far beyond the traditional confines of his discipline to develop an important new concept of culture. This groundbreaking book, winner of the 1974 Sorokin Award of the American Sociological Association, helped define for an entire generation of anthropologists what their field is ultimately about.

A Dream of England

Landscape, Photography, and the Tourist's Imagination
Author: John Taylor
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 9780719037245
Category: Art
Page: 295
View: 4945

Continue Reading →

This work explores English society and its relationship to the landscape, as seen through photography and tourism over the last 100 years. The major tourist venues are covered, including Stonehenge, National Trust houses, the Lake District and Shakespeare country.

Euphoria


Author: Lily King
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
ISBN: 1447286189
Category: Fiction
Page: 260
View: 3965

Continue Reading →

THE NEW YORK TIMES TOP TEN BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE 2014 KIRKUS PRIZE FOR FICTION Inspired by the true story of a woman who changed the way we understand our world. In 1933 three young, gifted anthropologists are thrown together in the jungle of New Guinea. They are Nell Stone, fascinating, magnetic and famous for her controversial work studying South Pacific tribes, her intelligent and aggressive husband Fen, and Andrew Bankson, who stumbles into the lives of this strange couple and becomes totally enthralled. Within months the trio are producing their best ever work, but soon a firestorm of fierce love and jealousy begins to burn out of control, threatening their bonds, their careers, and, ultimately, their lives . . . 'Dazzling' Emma Donoghue, author of Room

Contemporary Culture

New Directions in Arts and Humanities Research
Author: Judith Thissen,Robert Zwijnenberg,Kitty Zijlmans
Publisher: Amsterdam University Press - T
ISBN: 9789089644749
Category: Social Science
Page: 250
View: 4699

Continue Reading →

Are the humanities still relevant in the twenty-first century? In the context of pervasive economic liberalism and shrinking budgets, the importance of humanities research for society is increasingly put into question. This volume claims that the humanities do indeed matter by offering empirically grounded critical reflections on contemporary cultural practices, thereby opening up new ways of understanding social life and new directions in humanities scholarship. The contributors argue that the humanities can regain their relevance for society, pose new questions and provide fresh answers, while maintaining their core values: critical reflection, historical consciousness and analytical distance.

Arctic Dreams


Author: Barry Lopez
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1473512492
Category: Travel
Page: 512
View: 7936

Continue Reading →

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY ROBERT MACFARLANE Lopez’s journey across our frozen planet is a celebration of the Arctic in all its guises. A hostile landscape of ice, freezing oceans and dazzling skyscapes. Home to millions of diverse animals and people. The stage to massive migrations by land, sea and air. The setting of epic exploratory voyages. And, in crystalline prose, Lopez captures the magic of the Arctic – the essential mystery and beauty of a continent that has enchanted man’s imagination and ambition for centuries.

Destination Culture

Tourism, Museums, and Heritage
Author: Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520209664
Category: Art
Page: 326
View: 8966

Continue Reading →

With the question, "What does it mean to show?", the author explores the agency of display in museums and tourist attractions. She looks at how objects are made to perform their meaning by being collected and how techniques of display, not just the things shown, convey a powerful message.

A Companion to Psychological Anthropology

Modernity and Psychocultural Change
Author: Conerly Casey,Robert B. Edgerton
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470997222
Category: Social Science
Page: 552
View: 8348

Continue Reading →

This Companion provides the first definitive overview of psychocultural anthropology: a subject that focuses on cultural, psychological, and social interrelations across cultures. Brings together original essays by leading scholars in the field Offers an in-depth exploration of the concepts and topics that have emerged through contemporary ethnographic work and the processes of global change Key issues range from studies of consciousness and time, emotion, cognition, dreaming, and memory, to the lingering effects of racism and ethnocentrism, violence, identity and subjectivity

To Heaven and Back

A Doctor's Extraordinary Account of Her Death, Heaven, Angels, and Life Again
Author: Mary C Neal
Publisher: Authentic Media Inc
ISBN: 1780780540
Category: Religion
Page: 116
View: 3630

Continue Reading →

A doctor's account of her own experience of death, heaven and return to life with a new realization of her purpose on earth. Dr Mary Neal, an orthopaedic surgeon, was on a kayaking holiday in Chile. Sceptical of near death experiences, she was to have her life transformed when her kayak became wedged in rocks at the bottom of a waterfall and was underwater for so long that her heart stopped.To Heaven And Back is Mary's faith-enriching story of her spiritual journey, her first-hand experience of heaven and its continuing life-enhancing effects.

Stories from the landscape

archaeologies of inhabation
Author: Adrian M. Chadwick
Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Ltd
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 281
View: 7677

Continue Reading →

Man's impact on the landscape is obvious although, as this book makes clear, his relationship with the landscape is a complicated one and is both physical and emotional. This collection of 'stories', written by both field archaeologists and academics, aims to show how archaeology can give us 'an idea of how people in the past thought and moved about their landscapes on a routine, daily basis'. Combining theory with archaeological data the contributors discuss such themes as: landscape and technology; relams of existence in the early Neolithic of southern Britain; forest wilderness in the Middle Ages; the urban sprawl of Mexico City; architecture and buildings; the prehistoric Peak District; Cranborne Chase in Dorset; boundaries. Poems and interesting illustrations complement the stories.

The Life of Lines


Author: Tim Ingold
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317539346
Category: Social Science
Page: 172
View: 5298

Continue Reading →

To live, every being must put out a line, and in life these lines tangle with one another. This book is a study of the life of lines. Following on from Tim Ingold's groundbreaking work Lines: A Brief History, it offers a wholly original series of meditations on life, ground, weather, walking, imagination and what it means to be human. In the first part, Ingold argues that a world of life is woven from knots, and not built from blocks as commonly thought. He shows how the principle of knotting underwrites both the way things join with one another, in walls, buildings and bodies, and the composition of the ground and the knowledge we find there. In the second part, Ingold argues that to study living lines, we must also study the weather. To complement a linealogy that asks what is common to walking, weaving, observing, singing, storytelling and writing, he develops a meteorology that seeks the common denominator of breath, time, mood, sound, memory, colour and the sky. This denominator is the atmosphere. In the third part, Ingold carries the line into the domain of human life. He shows that for life to continue, the things we do must be framed within the lives we undergo. In continually answering to one another, these lives enact a principle of correspondence that is fundamentally social. This compelling volume brings our thinking about the material world refreshingly back to life. While anchored in anthropology, the book ranges widely over an interdisciplinary terrain that includes philosophy, geography, sociology, art and architecture.

The Better Angels of Our Nature

Why Violence Has Declined
Author: Steven Pinker
Publisher: Penguin Group USA
ISBN: 0143122010
Category: Psychology
Page: 802
View: 3012

Continue Reading →

Presents a controversial history of violence which argues that today's world is the most peaceful time in human existence, drawing on psychological insights into intrinsic values that are causing people to condemn violence as an acceptable measure.

How Forests Think

Toward an Anthropology Beyond the Human
Author: Eduardo Kohn
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520276108
Category: Science
Page: 267
View: 6629

Continue Reading →

Can forests think? Do dogs dream? In this astonishing book, Eduardo Kohn challenges the very foundations of anthropology, calling into question our central assumptions about what it means to be human—and thus distinct from all other life forms. Based on four years of fieldwork among the Runa of Ecuador’s Upper Amazon, Eduardo Kohn draws on his rich ethnography to explore how Amazonians interact with the many creatures that inhabit one of the world’s most complex ecosystems. Whether or not we recognize it, our anthropological tools hinge on those capacities that make us distinctly human. However, when we turn our ethnographic attention to how we relate to other kinds of beings, these tools (which have the effect of divorcing us from the rest of the world) break down. How Forests Think seizes on this breakdown as an opportunity. Avoiding reductionistic solutions, and without losing sight of how our lives and those of others are caught up in the moral webs we humans spin, this book skillfully fashions new kinds of conceptual tools from the strange and unexpected properties of the living world itself. In this groundbreaking work, Kohn takes anthropology in a new and exciting direction–one that offers a more capacious way to think about the world we share with other kinds of beings.