Lives of the Later Caesars


Author: Anthony Birley
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141935995
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 3105

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One of the most controversial of all works to survive from ancient Rome, the Augustan History is our main source of information about the Roman emperors from 117 to 284 AD. Written in the late fourth century by an anonymous author, it is an enigmatic combination of truth, invention and humour. This volume contains the first half of the History, and includes biographies of every emperor from Hadrian to Heliogabalus - among them the godlike Marcus Antonius and his grotesquely corrupt son Commodus. The History contains many fictitious (but highly entertaining) anecdotes about the depravity of the emperors, as the author blends historical fact and faked documents to present our most complete - albeit unreliable - account of the later Roman Caesars.

Lives of the Later Caesars


Author: Anthony Birley
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0140443088
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 336
View: 4861

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The Augustan history was written by an anonymous fourth century author pretending to be a team of six much earlier biographers. Historical fact about the Roman emperors from Hadrian through Heliogabulus is mixed with apocryphal anecdotes. Birley has bridged the gap between this text and Suetonius by including brief lives of Nerva and Trajan.

Lives of the Later Caesars


Author: Anthony Birley
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0140443088
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 336
View: 8706

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The Augustan history was written by an anonymous fourth century author pretending to be a team of six much earlier biographers. Historical fact about the Roman emperors from Hadrian through Heliogabulus is mixed with apocryphal anecdotes. Birley has bridged the gap between this text and Suetonius by including brief lives of Nerva and Trajan.

Caesar

Life of a Colossus
Author: Adrian Goldsworthy
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300139198
Category: History
Page: 592
View: 6076

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In this landmark biography, Goldsworthy places Caesar firmly within the context of Roman society in the first century B.C.

American Caesars

Lives of the Presidents from Franklin D. Roosevelt to George W. Bush
Author: Nigel Hamilton
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300171609
Category: Political leadership
Page: 596
View: 2076

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An insightful portrait of U.S. presidents from Franklin D. Roosevelt to George W. Bush. Hamilton examines their unique characters, their paths to Pennsylvania Avenue, their effectiveness as global leaders, and their lessons in governance, both good and bad.

Rome's Last Citizen

The Life and Legacy of Cato, Mortal Enemy of Caesar
Author: Rob Goodman,Jimmy Soni
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0312681232
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 366
View: 1049

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Presents a portrait of Marcus Porcius Cato that traces his life against a backdrop of period terrorism, a debt crisis, and a fractious ruling class, describing his defense of Roman traditions and his contributions to Christianity.

The Roman World 44 BC–AD 180


Author: Martin Goodman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113650933X
Category: History
Page: 436
View: 2605

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The Roman World 44 BC – AD 180 deals with the transformation of the Mediterranean regions, northern Europe and the Near East by the military autocrats who ruled Rome during this period. The book traces the impact of imperial politics on life in the city of Rome itself and in the rest of the empire, arguing that, despite long periods of apparent peace, this was a society controlled as much by fear of state violence as by consent. Martin Goodman examines the reliance of Roman emperors on a huge military establishment and the threat of force. He analyses the extent to which the empire functioned as a single political, economic and cultural unit and discusses, region by region, how much the various indigenous cultures and societies were affected by Roman rule. The book has a long section devoted to the momentous religious changes in this period, which witnessed the popularity and spread of a series of elective cults and the emergence of rabbinic Judaism and Christianity from the complex world of first-century Judaea. This book provides a critical assessment of the significance of Roman rule for inhabitants of the empire, and introduces readers to many of the main issues currently faced by historians of the early empire. This new edition, incorporating the finds of recent scholarship, includes a fuller narrative history, expanded sections on the history of women and slaves and on cultural life in the city of Rome, many new illustrations, an updated section of bibliographical notes, and other improvements designed to make the volume as useful as possible to students as well as the general reader.

The Age of Caesar: Five Roman Lives


Author: Plutarch
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393292835
Category: History
Page: 416
View: 8051

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“Plutarch regularly shows that great leaders transcend their own purely material interests and petty, personal vanities. Noble ideals actually do matter, in government as in life.” —Michael Dirda, Washington Post Pompey, Caesar, Cicero, Brutus, Antony: the names still resonate across thousands of years. Major figures in the civil wars that brutally ended the Roman republic, their lives pose a question that haunts us still: how to safeguard a republic from the flaws of its leaders. This reader’s edition of Plutarch delivers a fresh translation of notable clarity, explanatory notes, and ample historical context in the Preface and Introduction.

The Twelve Caesars


Author: Matthew Dennison
Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press
ISBN: 0857897802
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 300
View: 463

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One of them was a military genius; one murdered his mother and fiddled while Rome burned; another earned the nickname 'sphincter artist'. Six of their number were assassinated, two committed suicide - and five of them were elevated to the status of gods. They have come down to posterity as the 'twelve Caesars' - Julius Caesar, Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, Nero, Galba, Otho, Vitellius, Vespasian, Titus and Domitian. Under their rule, from 49 BC to AD 96, Rome was transformed from a republic to an empire, whose model of regal autocracy would survive in the West for more than a thousand years. Matthew Dennison offers a beautifully crafted sequence of colourful biographies of each emperor, triumphantly evoking the luxury, licence, brutality and sophistication of imperial Rome at its zenith. But as well as vividly recreating the lives, loves and vices of this motley group of despots, psychopaths and perverts, he paints a portrait of an erao of political and social revolution, of the bloody overthrow of a proud, 500-year-old political system and its replacement by a dictatorship which, against all the odds, succeeded more convincingly than oligarchic democracy in governing a vast international landmass.

The Later Roman Empire

(a.D. 354-378)
Author: Ammianus Marcellinus
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141921501
Category: History
Page: 512
View: 3705

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Ammianus Marcellinus was the last great Roman historian, and his writings rank alongside those of Livy and Tacitus. The Later Roman Empire chronicles a period of twenty-five years during Marcellinus' own lifetime, covering the reigns of Constantius, Julian, Jovian, Valentinian I, and Valens, and providing eyewitness accounts of significant military events including the Battle of Strasbourg and the Goth's Revolt. Portraying a time of rapid and dramatic change, Marcellinus describes an Empire exhausted by excessive taxation, corruption, the financial ruin of the middle classes and the progressive decline in the morale of the army. In this magisterial depiction of the closing decades of the Roman Empire, we can see the seeds of events that were to lead to the fall of the city, just twenty years after Marcellinus' death.

Trajan, Lion of Rome

The Untold Story of Rome's Greatest Emperor
Author: C. R. H. Wildfeuer
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780981846064
Category: Emperors
Page: 415
View: 422

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Trajan - Lion of Rome is a historical novel, based on the life of the Emperor Trajan (ruled 98-117 AD), who expanded the Roman Empire to its maximum size. The reader plunges into a world riveted by the power struggles between Empire and rebels, Emperor and Senate and Rome versus competing kingdoms at its borders. The book is meticulously researched and stays true to the historic events.Trajan, the son of a general, grows up with aspirations to exceed his thriving father as a soldier. Successful beyond his own expectations, Trajan is soon drawn into the conflict between the tyrant Domitian and a resentful Senate, led by Nerva. He needs to choose sides, supported by his wife Plotina and cousin Hadrian. After Domitian¿s assassination Nerva takes over and appoints Trajan as his successor. When Nerva dies two years later Trajan¿s time has come. Now he has to prove himself against the temptations of power and the siren song of military glory. He succeeds by leading a war of necessity against Dacian invaders, but his conquest of Mesopotamia turns into a huge challenge for himself and the whole Roman army.

SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome


Author: Mary Beard
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 1631491253
Category: History
Page: 512
View: 6461

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A sweeping, revisionist history of the Roman Empire from one of our foremost classicists. Ancient Rome was an imposing city even by modern standards, a sprawling imperial metropolis of more than a million inhabitants, a "mixture of luxury and filth, liberty and exploitation, civic pride and murderous civil war" that served as the seat of power for an empire that spanned from Spain to Syria. Yet how did all this emerge from what was once an insignificant village in central Italy? In S.P.Q.R., world-renowned classicist Mary Beard narrates the unprecedented rise of a civilization that even two thousand years later still shapes many of our most fundamental assumptions about power, citizenship, responsibility, political violence, empire, luxury, and beauty. From the foundational myth of Romulus and Remus to 212 ce—nearly a thousand years later—when the emperor Caracalla gave Roman citizenship to every free inhabitant of the empire, S.P.Q.R. (the abbreviation of "The Senate and People of Rome") examines not just how we think of ancient Rome but challenges the comfortable historical perspectives that have existed for centuries by exploring how the Romans thought of themselves: how they challenged the idea of imperial rule, how they responded to terrorism and revolution, and how they invented a new idea of citizenship and nation. Opening the book in 63 bce with the famous clash between the populist aristocrat Catiline and Cicero, the renowned politician and orator, Beard animates this “terrorist conspiracy,” which was aimed at the very heart of the Republic, demonstrating how this singular event would presage the struggle between democracy and autocracy that would come to define much of Rome’s subsequent history. Illustrating how a classical democracy yielded to a self-confident and self-critical empire, S.P.Q.R. reintroduces us, though in a wholly different way, to famous and familiar characters—Hannibal, Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Augustus, and Nero, among others—while expanding the historical aperture to include those overlooked in traditional histories: the women, the slaves and ex-slaves, conspirators, and those on the losing side of Rome’s glorious conquests. Like the best detectives, Beard sifts fact from fiction, myth and propaganda from historical record, refusing either simple admiration or blanket condemnation. Far from being frozen in marble, Roman history, she shows, is constantly being revised and rewritten as our knowledge expands. Indeed, our perceptions of ancient Rome have changed dramatically over the last fifty years, and S.P.Q.R., with its nuanced attention to class inequality, democratic struggles, and the lives of entire groups of people omitted from the historical narrative for centuries, promises to shape our view of Roman history for decades to come.

The Pursuit of Glory

The Five Revolutions that Made Modern Europe: 1648-1815
Author: Tim Blanning
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101202459
Category: History
Page: 736
View: 6741

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"History writing at its glorious best."--The New York Times "A triumphant success. [Blanning] brings knowledge, expertise, sound judgment and a colorful narrative style."--The Economist The New York Times bestselling volume in the Penguin History of Europe series Between the end of the Thirty Years' War and the Battle of Waterloo, Europe underwent an extraordinary transformatoin that saw five of the modern world's great revolutions--scientific, industrial, American, French, and romantic. In this much-admired addition to the monumental Penguin History of Europe series, Tim Blanning brilliantly investigates the forces that transformed Europe from a medieval society into a vigorous powerhose of the modern world. Blanning renders this vast subject immediate and absorbing by making fresh connections between the most mundane details of life and the major cultural, political, and technological transformations that birthed the modern age. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Suetonius: Lives of the Caesars, book V-VIII ; Lives of illustrious men


Author: Suetonius
Publisher: Loeb Classical Library
ISBN: 9780674995659
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 548
View: 7619

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Enriched by anecdotes, gossip, and details of character and personal appearance, Lives of the Caesars by Suetonius (born c. 70 CE) is a valuable and colourful source of information about the first twelve Roman emperors, Roman imperial politics, and Roman imperial socity. Part of Suetonius' Lives of Illustrious Men (of letters) also survives.

If I Live to Be 100

Lessons from the Centenarians
Author: Neenah Ellis
Publisher: Harmony
ISBN: 0307565831
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 272
View: 7052

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Neenah Ellis's New York Times bestselling If I Live to Be 100 takes us inside the world of the very old and invites us to learn from them the art of living well for an exceptionally long period of time. Their stories add up to a course in living, with lessons and inspiration for all of us. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Suetonius

Julius, Augustus, Tiberius, Gaius, Caligula
Author: Suetonius,John Carew Rolfe
Publisher: Loeb Classical Library
ISBN: N.A
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 507
View: 7999

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Suetonius (C. Suetonius Tranquillus, born ca. 70 CE), son of a military tribune, was at first an advocate and a teacher of rhetoric, but later became the emperor Hadrian's private secretary, 119–121. He dedicated to C. Septicius Clarus, prefect of the praetorian guard, his Lives of the Caesars. After the dismissal of both men for some breach of court etiquette, Suetonius apparently retired and probably continued his writing. His other works, many known by title, are now lost except for part of the Lives of Illustrious Men (of letters). Friend of Pliny the Younger, Suetonius was a studious and careful collector of facts, so that the extant lives of the emperors (including Julius Caesar the dictator) to Domitian are invaluable. His plan in Lives of the Caesars is: the emperor's family and early years; public and private life; death. We find many anecdotes, much gossip of the imperial court, and various details of character and personal appearance. Suetonius's account of Nero's death is justly famous. The Loeb Classical Library edition of Suetonius is in two volumes. Both volumes were revised throughout in 1997-98, and a new Introduction added.

Suetonius: Galba, Otho, Vitellius


Author: Suetonius
Publisher: Bristol Classical Press
ISBN: 9781853991202
Category: Drama
Page: 192
View: 3368

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This edition comprises the Roman historian Suetonius' lives of the first three emperors of AD 69, the Year of the Four Emperors. The Latin text is accompanied by an introduction and useful historical commentary.

The Silver Caesars

A Renaissance Mystery
Author: Julia Siemon
Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art
ISBN: 1588396398
Category: Antiques & Collectibles
Page: 218
View: 9314

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The twelve monumental silver-gilt standing cups known as the Aldobrandini Tazze constitute perhaps the most enigmatic masterpiece of Renaissance European metalwork. Topped with statuettes of the Twelve Caesars, the tazze are decorated with marvelously detailed scenes illustrating the lives of those ancient Roman rulers. The work’s origin is unknown, and the ensemble was divided in the nineteenth century and widely dispersed, greatly hampering study. This volume, inspired by a groundbreaking symposium at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, examines topics ranging from the tazze’s representation of the ancient world to their fate in the hands of nineteenth-century collectors, and presents newly discovered archival material and advanced scientific findings. The distinguished essayists propose answers to critical questions that have long surrounded the set and shed light on the stature of Renaissance goldsmiths’ work as an art form, establishing a new standard for the study of Renaissance silver.

Day of the Caesars (Eagles of the Empire 16)


Author: Simon Scarrow
Publisher: Headline
ISBN: 1472213378
Category: Fiction
Page: 448
View: 1107

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The Sunday Times bestseller AD 54. Claudius is dead. Rome is in turmoil. And two brave heroes of the Roman army face the challenge of their lives. Simon Scarrow's DAY OF THE CAESARS is not to be missed by readers of Conn Iggulden and Bernard Cornwell. 'A new book in Simon Scarrow's series about the Roman army is always a joy' The Times The Emperor Claudius is dead. Nero rules. His half-brother Britannicus has also laid claim to the throne. A bloody power struggle is underway. All Prefect Cato and Centurion Macro want is a simple army life, fighting with their brave and loyal men. But Cato has caught the eye of rival factions determined to get him on their side. To survive, Cato must play a cunning game, and enlist the help of the one man in the Empire he can trust: Macro. As the rebel force grows, legionaries and Praetorian Guards are moved like chess pieces by powerful and shadowy figures. A political game has created the ultimate military challenge. Can civil war be averted? The future of the Empire is in Cato's hands... IF YOU DON'T KNOW SIMON SCARROW, YOU DON'T KNOW ROME!