Lincoln and the Court


Author: Brian McGinty
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674040821
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 8960

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In a meticulously researched and engagingly written narrative, McGinty rescues the story of Abraham Lincoln and the Supreme Court from long and undeserved neglect, recounting the compelling history of the Civil War president's relations with the nation's highest tribunal and the role it played in resolving the agonizing issues raised by the conflict.

Lincoln's Greatest Case: The River, the Bridge, and the Making of America


Author: Brian McGinty
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 087140785X
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 4025

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The untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight. In May of 1856, the steamboat Effie Afton barreled into a pillar of the Rock Island Bridge, unalterably changing the course of American transportation history. Within a year, long-simmering tensions between powerful steamboat interests and burgeoning railroads exploded, and the nation’s attention, absorbed by the Dred Scott case, was riveted by a new civil trial. Dramatically reenacting the Effie Afton case—from its unlikely inception, complete with a young Abraham Lincoln’s soaring oratory, to the controversial finale—this “masterful” (Christian Science Monitor) account gives us the previously untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight.

Lincoln and the common law

a collection of Lincoln's Illinois Supreme Court cases from 1838-1861 and their influence on the evolution of Illinois common law
Author: Dan W. Bannister,Illinois. Supreme Court
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Law
Page: 261
View: 500

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The Lincoln Assassination Trial - The Court Transcripts


Author: William C. Edwards
Publisher: William Edwards
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 2318

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This is a transcript of NARA M599 Reels 8-15. It contains the arguments and summaries as well as the full testimony of each witness. It also contains the testimony of the perjured witnesses. This along with "The Lincoln Assassination: The Evidence" and The Lincoln Assassination: The Reward Files" constitute a large majority of the primary evidence of the assassination.

The Age of Lincoln and the Art of American Power, 1848-1876


Author: William Nester
Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.
ISBN: 1612346596
Category: History
Page: 392
View: 2796

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Although Abraham Lincoln was among seven presidents who served during the tumultuous years between the end of the Mexican War and the end of the Reconstruction era, history has not been kind to the others: Zachary Taylor, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Andrew Johnson, and Ulysses S. Grant. In contrast, history sees Abraham Lincoln as a giant in character and deeds. During his presidency, he governed brilliantly, developed the economy, liberated four million people from slavery, reunified the nation, and helped enact the Homestead Act, among other accomplishments. He proved to be not only an outstanding commander in chief but also a skilled diplomat, economist, humanist, educator, and moralist. Lincoln achieved that and more because he was a master of the art of American power. He understood that the struggle for hearts and minds was the essence of politics in a democracy. He asserted power mostly by appealing to peopleÆs hopes rather than their fears. All along he tried to shape rather than reflect prevailing public opinions that differed from his own. To that end, he was brilliant at bridging the gap between progressives and conservatives by reining in the former and urging on the latter. His art of power ultimately reflected his unswerving devotion to the Declaration of IndependenceÆs principles and the ConstitutionÆs institutions, or as he so elegantly expressed it, ôto a government of the people, by the people, and for the people.ö

Courts and Congress

America's Unwritten Constitution
Author: William J. Quirk
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 1412813573
Category: Political Science
Page: 330
View: 5851

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It's often said, confirmed by survey data, that the American people are losing confidence in their government. But the problem may be the reverse--the government has lost confidence in the people. Increasingly the power to make decisions in our democracy has been shifted from Congress to the court system, forcing non-elected officials to make decisions which affect the lives of Americans. In a society which is based on the democratic elections of its officials, this is clearly backwards. Quirk maintains that what he calls "The Happy Convention," an informal and unwritten rearrangement of "passing the buck" of government powers, is done to avoid blame and approval ratings becoming lower for a particular person or party. For example, The Happy Convention assigns the power to declare and make war to the President. Congress and the Court play a supporting role--Congress, when requested, gives the President a blank check to use force--the Court throws out any challenges to the legality of the war. Everyone wins if the war avoids disaster. If it turns out badly, the President is held accountable. His ratings fall, reelection is out of the question, congressmen say he lied to them; his Party is likely to lose the next election. In this way, Quirk reminds us that The Happy Convention is not what the Founders intended for us. For democracy to work properly, the American people have to know what options they have. Courts and Congress argues the case for reestablishing the balance of powers between the courts, the Congress, and the Presidency.

Packing the Court

The Rise of Judicial Power and the Coming Crisis of the Supreme Court
Author: James Macgregor Burns
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101081902
Category: Political Science
Page: 336
View: 7102

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From renowned political theorist James MacGregor Burns, an incisive critique of the overreaching power of an ideological Supreme Court For decades, Pulitzer Prize-winner James MacGregor Burns has been one of the great masters of the study of power and leadership in America. In Packing the Court, he turns his eye to the U.S. Supreme Court, an institution that he believes has become more powerful, and more partisan, than the founding fathers ever intended. In a compelling and provocative narrative, Burns reveals how the Supreme Court has served as a reactionary force in American politics at critical moments throughout the nation's history, and concludes with a bold proposal to rein in the court's power.

Lincoln and the Jews

A History
Author: Jonathan D. Sarna,Benjamin Shapell
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1466864613
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 6617

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One hundred and fifty years after Abraham Lincoln's death, the full story of his extraordinary relationship with Jews is told here for the first time. Lincoln and the Jews: A History provides readers both with a captivating narrative of his interactions with Jews, and with the opportunity to immerse themselves in rare manuscripts and images, many from the Shapell Lincoln Collection, that show Lincoln in a way he has never been seen before. Lincoln's lifetime coincided with the emergence of Jews on the national scene in the United States. When he was born, in 1809, scarcely 3,000 Jews lived in the entire country. By the time of his assassination in 1865, large-scale immigration, principally from central Europe, had brought that number up to more than 150,000. Many Americans, including members of Lincoln's cabinet and many of his top generals during the Civil War, were alarmed by this development and treated Jews as second-class citizens and religious outsiders. Lincoln, this book shows, exhibited precisely the opposite tendency. He also expressed a uniquely deep knowledge of the Old Testament, employing its language and concepts in some of his most important writings. He befriended Jews from a young age, promoted Jewish equality, appointed numerous Jews to public office, had Jewish advisors and supporters starting already from the early 1850s, as well as later during his two presidential campaigns, and in response to Jewish sensitivities, even changed the way he thought and spoke about America. Through his actions and his rhetoric—replacing "Christian nation," for example, with "this nation under God"—he embraced Jews as insiders. In this groundbreaking work, the product of meticulous research, historian Jonathan D. Sarna and collector Benjamin Shapell reveal how Lincoln's remarkable relationship with American Jews impacted both his path to the presidency and his policy decisions as president. The volume uncovers a new and previously unknown feature of Abraham Lincoln's life, one that broadened him, and, as a result, broadened America.

The Presidents and the Supreme Court

What Kind of Nation; Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney; FDR and Chief Justice Hughes
Author: James F. Simon
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451671636
Category: History
Page: 1168
View: 2035

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Collected together, James F. Simon’s books share the bitter struggles and compromises that have characterized the relationship between the presidents and the Supreme Court Chief Justices across US history. The bitter and protracted struggle between President Thomas Jefferson and Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall; the frustration and grudging admiration between FDR and Chief Justice Hughes; the clashes between President Abraham Lincoln and Chief Justice Roger B. Taney. These were the conflicts that ended slavery, that rescued us from the Great Depression, and that defined a nation—for better and for worse. And, Simon brings them to brilliant and compelling life.

The Library of Congress Illustrated Timeline of the Civil War


Author: Margaret E. Wagner,Library of Congress
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0316193615
Category: History
Page: 264
View: 4037

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With striking visuals from the Library of Congress' unparalleled archive, THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS ILLUSTRATED TIMELINE OF THE CIVIL WAR is an authoritative and engaging narrative of the domestic conflict that determined the course of American history. A detailed chronological timeline of the war captures the harrowing intensity of 19th-century warfare in first-hand accounts from soldiers, nurses, and front-line journalists. Readers will be enthralled by speech drafts in Lincoln's own hand, quotes from the likes of Frederick Douglass and Robert E. Lee, and portraits of key soldiers and politicians who are not covered in standard textbooks. The Illustrated Timeline's exciting new source material and lucid organization will give Civil War enthusiasts a fresh look at this defining period in our nation's history.

The Lincoln Myth

A Novel
Author: Steve Berry
Publisher: Ballantine Books
ISBN: 0345526597
Category: Fiction
Page: 448
View: 2117

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A Cotton Malone adventure involving a flaw in the United States Constitution, a mystery about Abraham Lincoln, and a political issue that’s as explosive as it is timely—not only in Malone’s world, but in ours September 1861: All is not as it seems. With these cryptic words, a shocking secret passed down from president to president comes to rest in the hands of Abraham Lincoln. And as the first bloody clashes of the Civil War unfold, Lincoln alone must decide how best to use this volatile knowledge: save thousands of American lives, or keep the young nation from being torn apart forever? The present: In Utah, the fabled remains of Mormon pioneers whose nineteenth-century expedition across the desert met with a murderous end have been uncovered. In Washington, D.C., the official investigation of an international entrepreneur, an elder in the Mormon church, has sparked a political battle between the White House and a powerful United States senator. In Denmark, a Justice Department agent, missing in action, has fallen into the hands of a dangerous zealot—a man driven by divine visions to make a prophet’s words reality. And in a matter of a few short hours, Cotton Malone has gone from quietly selling books at his shop in Denmark to dodging bullets in a high-speed boat chase. All it takes is a phone call from his former boss in Washington, and suddenly the ex-agent is racing to rescue an informant carrying critical intelligence. It’s just the kind of perilous business that Malone has been trying to leave behind, ever since he retired from the Justice Department. But once he draws enemy blood, Malone is plunged into a deadly conflict—a constitutional war secretly set in motion more than two hundred years ago by America’s Founding Fathers. From the streets of Copenhagen to the catacombs of Salzburg to the rugged mountains of Utah, the grim specter of the Civil War looms as a dangerous conspiracy gathers power. Malone risks life, liberty, and his greatest love in a race for the truth about Abraham Lincoln—while the fate of the United States of America hangs in the balance. Praise for Steve Berry and his Cotton Malone series “In Malone, [Steve] Berry has created a classic, complex hero.”—USA Today “Malone, a hero with a personal stake in the proceedings, is a welcome respite from the cold, calculating superspies who litter the genre.”—Entertainment Weekly “Steve Berry gets better and better with each new book.”—The Huffington Post “Savvy readers . . . cannot go wrong with Cotton Malone.”—Library Journal “Berry raises this genre’s stakes.”—The New York Times “I love this guy.”—#1 New York Times bestselling author Lee Child From the Hardcover edition.

The Henrician Reformation

The Diocese of Lincoln Under John Longland 1521-1547
Author: Margaret Bowker
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521236393
Category: History
Page: 229
View: 1831

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The book will be invaluable reading for students of the social, ecclesiastical and political history of early modern England.

Journal of the Civil War Era

Summer 2013 Issue
Author: William A. Blair
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469608979
Category: History
Page: 176
View: 1017

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The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 3, Number 2 June 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS Editor's Note William Blair Articles Stephen Cushman When Lincoln Met Emerson Christopher Phillips Lincoln's Grasp of War: Hard War and the Politics of Neutrality and Slavery in the Western Border Slave States, 1861–1862 Jonathan W. White The Strangely Insignificant Role of the U.S. Supreme Court in the Civil War Review Essay Yael Sternhell Revisionism Reinvented? The Antiwar Turn in Civil War Scholarship Professional Notes Gary W. Gallagher The Civil War at the Sesquicentennial: How Well Do Americans Understand Their Great National Crisis? Book Reviews Books Received Notes on Contributors The Journal of the Civil War Era takes advantage of the flowering of research on the many issues raised by the sectional crisis, war, Reconstruction, and memory of the conflict, while bringing fresh understanding to the struggles that defined the period, and by extension, the course of American history in the nineteenth century.

I Am Abraham: A Novel of Lincoln and the Civil War


Author: Jerome Charyn
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0871407728
Category: Fiction
Page: 464
View: 7584

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Jerome Charyn’s “daring” and “memorable” (The New Yorker) historical novel renders the inner life of our sixteenth president like never before. This unforgettable portrait of Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War effortlessly mixes humor with Shakespearean-like tragedy to create an achingly human portrait of the sixteenth president. Charyn conducts an orchestra of historical figures and fictional extras centered around a profoundly moral but troubled commander in chief whose relationship with his Ophelia-like wife and his sons—Robert, Willie, and Tad—is explored with penetrating psychological insight and the utmost compassion. Seized by melancholy and imbued with an unfaltering sense of human worth, Charyn’s President Lincoln comes to vibrant, three-dimensional life in a haunting portrait we have rarely seen in historical fiction.

A History of the Law, the Courts, and the Lawyers of Maine

From Its First Colonization to the Early Part of the Present Century
Author: William Willis
Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.
ISBN: 1584776285
Category: History
Page: 712
View: 685

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Willis, William. A History of the Law, The Courts, and The Lawyers of Maine, From Its First Colonization to the Early Part of the Present Century. Portland, Bailey & Noyes, 1863. iv, [ii], [v]-viii, [2], [9]-712 pp. Reprinted 2006 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. 2005. ISBN-13: 978-1-58477-628-4. ISBN-10: 1-58477-628-5 Cloth. $95.* Early histories by local lawyers, such as this one, are often quite valuable because they were written by people who were steeped in local traditions and had access to practitioners of the preceding generation, who were invaluable sources of fact and anecdote about their generation and the generation that preceded them. Written during the early 1860s, this book draws on interviews with people who practiced before Maine was a state and could recall anecdotes from the colonial period. Along with historical chapters and biographical sketches of such lawyers as Simon Greenleaf and William B. Sewall, the book has information about "social usages of the bar," popular law books and how lawyers from other colonies were treated.

Did Lincoln and the Republican Party Create the Civil War?

An Argument
Author: Robert P. Broadwater
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786433612
Category: History
Page: 247
View: 1746

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The author seeks to challenge the long-held perceptions of the politics of the American Civil War. He argues that the war was fought not to preserve the Union or free the slaves but rather to establish the political power of the Republican Party within the federal government. The author argues further that Abraham Lincoln and the Republican Party manipulated events to bring about the Civil War in the first place and used the war as a pretext for the establishment of the modern central government.

The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery


Author: Eric Foner
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393080827
Category: History
Page: 448
View: 2266

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“A masterwork [by] the preeminent historian of the Civil War era.”—Boston Globe Selected as a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times Book Review, this landmark work gives us a definitive account of Lincoln's lifelong engagement with the nation's critical issue: American slavery. A master historian, Eric Foner draws Lincoln and the broader history of the period into perfect balance. We see Lincoln, a pragmatic politician grounded in principle, deftly navigating the dynamic politics of antislavery, secession, and civil war. Lincoln's greatness emerges from his capacity for moral and political growth.