Killing the Black Body

Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty
Author: Dorothy Roberts
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0804152594
Category: Social Science
Page: 384
View: 9656

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The image of the “Welfare Queen” still dominates white America’s perceptions of Black women. It is an image that also continues to shape our government’s policies concerning Black women’s reproductive decisions. Proposed legislation to alleviate poverty focuses on plans to deny benefits to children born to welfare mothers and to require insertion of birth control implants as a condition of receiving aid. Meanwhile a booming fertility industry serves primarily infertile white couples. In Killing the Black Body, Northwestern University professor Dorothy Roberts exposes America’s systemic abuse of Black women’s bodies, from slave masters’ economic stake in bonded women’s fertility to government programs that coerced thousands of poor Black women into being sterilized as late as the 1970s. These abuses, Roberts argues, point not only to the degradation of Black motherhood but to the exclusion of Black women’s reproductive needs from the feminist agenda. Groundbreaking, authoritative, and timely, Killing the Black Body is both a powerful legal argument and a valuable aid for teachers, activists, and policy makers in creating a vision of reproductive freedom that respects each and every American.

Killing the Black Body

Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty
Author: Dorothy E. Roberts
Publisher: Vintage Books
ISBN: 0679758690
Category: Social Science
Page: 373
View: 2171

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A powerful, thought-provoking indictment of America's continuing assault on the reproductive rights of black women ranges from the era of slavery to the welfare reform acts of the 1990s that penalize women on welfare for having babies. Reprint. 15,000 first printing.

Imagining the Black Female Body

Reconciling Image in Print and Visual Culture
Author: C. Henderson
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230115470
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 218
View: 5019

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This volume explores issues of black female identity through the various "imaginings" of the black female body in print and visual culture. Contributions emphasize the ways in which the black female body is framed and how black women (and their allies) have sought to write themselves back into social discourses on their terms.

Pregnancy and Power

A Short History of Reproductive Politics in America
Author: Rickie Solinger
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814741193
Category: History
Page: 312
View: 8373

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A sweeping chronicle of women's battles for reproductive freedom throughout American history, Pregnancy and Power explores the many forces—social, racial, economic, and political—that have shaped women’s reproductive lives in the United States. Leading historian Rickie Solinger argues that a woman’s control over her body involves much more than the right to choose an abortion. Reproductive politics were at play when slaveholders devised breeding schemes, when the U.S. government took Indian children from their families in the nineteenth century, and when doctors pressed Latina women to be sterilized in the 1970s. Tracing the diverse plot lines of women’s reproductive lives throughout American history, Solinger redefines the idea of reproductive freedom, putting race and class at the center of the effort to control sex and pregnancy in America over time. Solinger asks which women have how many children under what circumstances, and shows how reproductive experiences have been encouraged or coerced, rewarded or punished, honored or exploited over the last 250 years. Viewed in this way, the debate over reproductive rights raises questions about access to sex education and prenatal care, about housing laws, about access to citizenship, and about which women lose children to adoption and foster care. Pregnancy and Power shows that a complete understanding of reproductive politics must take into account the many players shaping public policy—lawmakers, educators, employers, clergy, physicians—as well as the consequences for women who obey and resist these policies. Tracing the diverse plotlines of women's reproductive lives throughout American history, Solinger redefines the idea of reproductive freedom, putting race and class at the center of the struggle to control sex and pregnancy in America.

The Rise of Viagra

How the Little Blue Pill Changed Sex in America
Author: Meika Loe
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814744990
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 6981

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Since its introduction in 1998, Viagra has launched a new kind of sexual revolution. Quickly becoming one of the most sought after drugs in history, the little blue pill created a sea change within the pharmaceutical industry—from how drugs could be marketed to the types of drugs put into development—as well as the culture at large. Impotency is no longer an embarrassing male secret; now it is called “erectile dysfunction,” and is simply something to “ask your doctor” about. And over 16 million men have. The Rise of Viagra is the first book to detail the history and the vast social implications of the Viagra phenomenon. Meika Loe argues that Viagra has changed what qualifies as normal sex in America. In the quick-fix, pill-for-everything culture that Viagra helped to create, erections can now be had by popping a pill, making sex on demand, regardless of age or infirmity, and, potentially, for the rest of one's life. Drawing on interviews with men who take the drug, their wives, doctors and pharmacists as well as scientists and researchers in the field, this fascinating account provides an intimate history of the drug's effect on America. Loe also examines the quest for the female Viagra, the impact of the drug around the world, the introduction of new erection drugs, like Levitra and Cialis, and the rapid growth of the multi-billion dollar pharmaceutical industry. This wide-ranging book explains how this medical breakthrough and cultural phenomenon have forever changed the meaning of sex in America.

Our Bodies, Our Crimes

The Policing of Women’s Reproduction in America
Author: Jeanne Flavin
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814727553
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 1134

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Winner of the 2010 Distinguished Book Award from the American Sociological Association; Sex and Gender Section The Real Issue behind the Abortion Debate An op-ed by Jeanne Flavin in the San Francisco Chronicle 2009 Choice Outstanding Academic Title The intense policing of women’s reproductive capacity places women’s health and human rights in great peril. Poor women are pressured to undergo sterilization. Women addicted to illicit drugs risk arrest for carrying their pregnancies to term. Courts, child welfare, and law enforcement agencies fail to recognize the efforts of battered and incarcerated women to care for their children. Pregnant inmates are subject to inhumane practices such as shackling during labor and poor prenatal care. And decades after Roe, the criminalization of certain procedures and regulation of abortion providers still obstruct women’s access to safe and private abortions. In this important work, Jeanne Flavin looks beyond abortion to document how the law and the criminal justice system police women’s rights to conceive, to be pregnant, and to raise their children. Through vivid and disturbing case studies, Flavin shows how the state seeks to establish what a “good woman” and “fit mother” should look like and whose reproduction is valued. With a stirring conclusion that calls for broad-based measures that strengthen women’s economic position , choice-making, autonomy, sexual freedom, and health care, Our Bodies, Our Crimes is a battle cry for all women in their fight to be fully recognized as human beings. At its heart, this book is about the right of a woman to be a healthy and valued member of society independent of how or whether she reproduces.

Reclaiming Spirit in the Black Faith Tradition


Author: D. Hicks
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137269111
Category: Philosophy
Page: 233
View: 5914

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This work attempts to uncover the function of religion for those degraded on the basis of race. Accordingly, Recalibrating Spirit reveals the role of religion in critical reflection on and active protest against negative assertions about racial identity in general, and the abuse of black life in particular.

Wagadu Volume 4

Intersecting Gender and Disability Perspectives in Rethinking Postcolonial Identities
Author: Pushpa Parekh
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1465331603
Category: Social Science
Page: 252
View: 7455

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This volume of Wagadu: A Journal of Transnational Womens and Gender Studies launches its second printed edition. Wagaduthe Soninke name of the Ghana Empirecontrolled the present-day Mali, Mauritania and Senegal and was famous for its prosperity and power from approximately 300-1076 CE. It constituted the bridge between North Africa, the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern worlds and Sub-Saharan Africa. Ghana gave birth to the two most powerful West African Empires: Mali and Songhay. The modern country of Ghana (former British Gold Coast) derives its name from the Ghana Empire. Why Wagadu? Wagadu has come to be the symbol of the sacrifice women continue to make for a better world. Wagadu has become the metaphor for the role of women in the family, community, country, and planet. Duna taka siro no yagare npale The world does not go without women. This volume investigates the intersecting perspectives, grounded in or emanating from theoretical, discursive as well as experiential frameworks and positions specific to gender, disability and postcoloniality.

Der perfekte Kleiderschrank

Die 100 Style-Klassiker, die jede Frau braucht
Author: Nina Garcia
Publisher: Mosaik Verlag
ISBN: 3641121698
Category: Self-Help
Page: 320
View: 7728

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Die 100 Style-Klassiker, die in jeden Kleiderschrank gehören Besitzen Sie Kleidungsstücke, in denen Sie immer toll aussehen? Oder nur Fehlkäufe? Die Moderedakteurin Nina Garcia erklärt charmant-gewitzt, was ihre Top 100 der klassischen Kleidungsstücke sind, die jede Frau braucht, und wie man aus diesen seinen eigenen Stil entwickelt. Als Einkaufsführer sowie Bezugssystem ist diese Liste ein Leitfaden, ein Barometer von Modeartikeln, die der Zeit sowie den Trends getrotzt haben.

Queering the Biopolitics of Citizenship in the Age of Obama


Author: J. Rohrer
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137488204
Category: Political Science
Page: 85
View: 9773

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The book from the interdisciplinary fields of queer theory, critical race theory, feminist political theory, disability studies, and indigenous studies to demonstrate that analyzing contemporary notions of citizenship requires understanding the machinations of governmentality and biopolitics in the (re)production of the proper citizen.

Wombs in Labor

Transnational Commercial Surrogacy in India
Author: Amrita Pande
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231538189
Category: Social Science
Page: 272
View: 5677

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Surrogacy is India's new form of outsourcing, as couples from all over the world hire Indian women to bear their children for a fraction of the cost of surrogacy elsewhere with little to no government oversight or regulation. In the first detailed ethnography of India's surrogacy industry, Amrita Pande visits clinics and hostels and speaks with surrogates and their families, clients, doctors, brokers, and hostel matrons in order to shed light on this burgeoning business and the experiences of the laborers within it. From recruitment to training to delivery, Pande's research focuses on how reproduction meets production in surrogacy and how this reflects characteristics of India's larger labor system. Pande's interviews prove surrogates are more than victims of disciplinary power, and she examines the strategies they deploy to retain control over their bodies and reproductive futures. While some women are coerced into the business by their families, others negotiate with clients and their clinics to gain access to technologies and networks otherwise closed to them. As surrogates, the women Pande meets get to know and make the most of advanced medical discoveries. They traverse borders and straddle relationships that test the boundaries of race, class, religion, and nationality. Those who focus on the inherent inequalities of India's surrogacy industry believe the practice should be either banned or strictly regulated. Pande instead advocates for a better understanding of this complex labor market, envisioning an international model of fair-trade surrogacy founded on openness and transparency in all business, medical, and emotional exchanges.

The Palgrave Handbook of Gender and Healthcare


Author: E. Kuhlmann,E. Annandale
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137295406
Category: Social Science
Page: 535
View: 4184

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An authoritative, state-of-the-art collection that brings together key experts to provide an overview of the field. This new paperback edition includes 3 new chapters on human resources and health, end-of-life care and complementary and alternative medicine as well as thorough updates to the introduction and conclusion.

Inner Lives

Voices of African American Women In Prison
Author: Paula Johnson
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814743854
Category: Law
Page: 356
View: 7699

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The rate of women entering prison has increased nearly 400 percent since 1980, with African American women constituting the largest percentage of this population. However, despite their extremely disproportional representation in correctional institutions, little attention has been paid to their experiences within the criminal justice system. Inner Lives provides readers the rare opportunity to intimately connect with African American women prisoners. By presenting the women's stories in their own voices, Paula C. Johnson captures the reality of those who are in the system, and those who are working to help them. Johnson offers a nuanced and compelling portrait of this fastest-growing prison population by blending legal history, ethnography, sociology, and criminology. These striking and vivid narratives are accompanied by equally compelling arguments by Johnson on how to reform our nation's laws and social policies, in order to eradicate existing inequalities. Her thorough and insightful analysis of the historical and legal background of contemporary criminal law doctrine, sentencing theories, and correctional policies sets the stage for understanding the current system.

The Politics of Disgust

The Public Identity of the Welfare Queen
Author: Ange-Marie Hancock
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814736580
Category: Political Science
Page: 210
View: 6553

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Winner of the 2006 Race, Ethnicity, and Politics Organized Section Best First Book Award from the American Political Science Association Winner of the 2006 W.E.B. DuBois Book Award from the National Conference of Black Political Scientists Ange-Marie Hancock argues that longstanding beliefs about poor African American mothers were the foundation for the contentious 1996 welfare reform debate that effectively "ended welfare as we know it." By examining the public identity of the so-called welfare queen and its role in hindering democratic deliberation, The Politics of Disgust shows how stereotypes and politically motivated misperceptions about race, class and gender were effectively used to instigate a politics of disgust. The ongoing role of the politics of disgust in welfare policy is revealed here by using content analyses of the news media, the 1996 congressional floor debates, historical evidence and interviews with welfare recipients themselves. Hancock's incisive analysis is both compelling and disturbing, suggesting the great limits of today's democracy in guaranteeing not just fair and equitable policy outcomes, but even a fair chance for marginalized citizens to participate in the process.

Battleground: M-Z


Author: Amy Lind,Stephanie Brzuzy
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313340390
Category: Electronic books
Page: 662
View: 6200

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Contains ninety-seven alphabetically arranged entries that provide information about women's studies topics, such as abortion, bisexuality, childcare, glass ceiling, nationalism, religion, sex work, and welfare reform.

Knock Me Up, Knock Me Down

Images of Pregnancy in Hollywood Films
Author: Kelly Oliver
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231530706
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 248
View: 4235

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No longer is pregnancy a repulsive or shameful condition in Hollywood films, but an attractive attribute, often enhancing the romantic or comedic storyline of a female character. Kelly Oliver investigates this curious shift and its reflection of changing attitudes toward women's roles in reproduction and the family. Not all representations signify progress. Oliver finds that in many pregnancy films, our anxieties over modern reproductive practices and technologies are made manifest, and in some cases perpetuate conventions curtailing women's freedom. Reading such films as Where the Heart Is (2000), Riding in Cars with Boys (2001), Palindromes (2004), Saved! (2004), Quinceañera (2006), Children of Men (2006), Knocked Up (2007), Juno (2007), Baby Mama (2008), Away We Go (2009), Precious (2009), The Back-up Plan (2010), Due Date (2010), and Twilight: Breaking Dawn (2011), Oliver investigates pregnancy as a vehicle for romance, a political issue of "choice," a representation of the hosting of "others," a prism for fears of miscegenation, and a screen for modern technological anxieties.

Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women

Global Women's Issues and Knowledge
Author: Cheris Kramarae,Dale Spender
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135963150
Category: Reference
Page: 2050
View: 4859

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For a full list of entries and contributors, sample entries, and more, visit the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women website. Featuring comprehensive global coverage of women's issues and concerns, from violence and sexuality to feminist theory, the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women brings the field into the new millennium. In over 900 signed A-Z entries from US and Europe, Asia, the Americas, Oceania, and the Middle East, the women who pioneered the field from its inception collaborate with the new scholars who are shaping the future of women's studies to create the new standard work for anyone who needs information on women-related subjects.

Violence in the Lives of Black Women

Battered, Black, and Blue
Author: Carolyn West
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317787609
Category: Family & Relationships
Page: 228
View: 1545

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Break the silence surrounding Black women's experiences of violence! Written from a Black feminist perspective by therapists, researchers, activists, and survivors, Violence in the Lives of Black Women: Battered, Black, and Blue sheds new light on an understudied field. For too long, Black women have been suffering the effects of violence in painful silence. This book—winner of the Carolyn Payton Early Career Award for its contribution to the understanding of the role of gender in the lives of Black women—provides a forum where personal testimony and academic research meet to show you how living at the intersection of many kinds of oppression shapes the lives of Black women. With moving case studies, in-depth discussions of activism and resistance, and helpful suggestions for treatment and intervention, this book will help you understand the impact of violence on the lives of Black women. Topics you'll find in Violence in the Lives of Black Women include: using the arts to deal with sexual aggression in the Black community racial aspects of sexual harassment the consequences of head and brain injuries stemming from abuse domestic violence in African-American lesbian relationships strategies Black women use to escape violent living situations lifelong effects of childhood sexual abuse on Black women's mental health references and resources to help you learn more!

Unnatural Selections

Eugenics in American Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance
Author: Daylanne K. English
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807863521
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 8806

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Challenging conventional constructions of the Harlem Renaissance and American modernism, Daylanne English links writers from both movements to debates about eugenics in the Progressive Era. She argues that, in the 1920s, the form and content of writings by figures as disparate as W. E. B. Du Bois, T. S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, and Nella Larsen were shaped by anxieties regarding immigration, migration, and intraracial breeding. English's interdisciplinary approach brings together the work of those canonical writers with relatively neglected literary, social scientific, and visual texts. She examines antilynching plays by Angelina Weld Grimke as well as the provocative writings of white female eugenics field workers. English also analyzes the Crisis magazine as a family album filtering uplift through eugenics by means of photographic documentation of an ever-improving black race. English suggests that current scholarship often misreads early-twentieth-century visual, literary, and political culture by applying contemporary social and moral standards to the past. Du Bois, she argues, was actually more of a eugenicist than Eliot. Through such reconfiguration of the modern period, English creates an allegory for the American present: because eugenics was, in its time, widely accepted as a reasonable, progressive ideology, we need to consider the long-term implications of contemporary genetic engineering, fertility enhancement and control, and legislation promoting or discouraging family growth.

The Wire and Philosophy

This America, Man
Author: David Bzdak,Joanna Crosby,Seth Vannatta
Publisher: Open Court
ISBN: 0812698282
Category: Philosophy
Page: 384
View: 7107

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By many accounts, HBO’s The Wire was and remains the greatest and most important television drama of all time. Conceived by writers David Simon and ex-Baltimore homicide detective Ed Burns, this five-season, sixty-episode tour de force has raised the bar for compelling, intelligent television production. With each season addressing a different arena of life in the city of Baltimore, and each season’s narratives tapping into those from previous seasons, The Wire was able to reveal the overlapping, criss-crossing, and colliding realities that shape—if not control—the people, institutions, and culture of the modern American city. The Wire and Philosophy celebrates this show’s realism as well as its intellectual and philosophical clarity. Selected philosophers who are fans of The Wire tap into these conflicts and interconnections to expose the underlying philosophical issues and assumptions and pursue questions, such as, Can cops really tell whether they are smarter than their perps? Or do they fall victim to intellectual vanity? Do individuals really have free will to resist the temptations—of gangs, of drugs, or corruption—that surround them? Is David Simon a modern-day Marx who sees capitalism leading ultimately to its own collapse, or is Baltimore’s story uniquely its own?