Japanese Tales


Author: Royall Tyler
Publisher: Pantheon
ISBN: 0307784061
Category: Fiction
Page: 400
View: 8009

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Two hundred and twenty tales from medieval Japan—tales that welcome us into a fabulous faraway world populated by saints, scoundrels, ghosts, magical healers, and a vast assortment of deities and demons. Stories of miracles, visions of hell, jokes, fables, and legends, these tales reflect the Japanese civilization. They ably balance the lyrical and the dramatic, the ribald and the profound, offering a window into a long-vanished culture. With black-and-white illustrations throughout Part of the Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library

Japanese Fairy Tales


Author: Lafcadio Hearn,Grace James,Basil Hall Chamberlain
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Fairy tales
Page: 160
View: 2714

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Japanese Fairy Tales (Illustrated)


Author: Yei Theodora Ozaki
Publisher: Full Moon Publications
ISBN: N.A
Category: Fiction
Page: N.A
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Japanese Fairy Tales signifies a certain set of well-known classic tales, with a vague distinction of whether they fit the rigorous definition of folktale or not. The admixed imposters are literate written pieces, dating back to the Muromachi period (14th-16th centuries) or even earlier times in the Middle Ages. These would not normally qualify as "folktales" (i.e., pieces collected from oral tradition among the populace). In a more stringent sense, "Japanese folktales" refer to orally transmitted folk narrative. Systematic collection of specimens was pioneered by folklorist Kunio Yanagita. Yanagita disliked the word minwa, a coined term directly translated from "folktale" (Yanagita stated that the term was not familiar to actual old folk he collected folktales from, and was not willing to "go along" with the conventions of other countries). He therefore proposed the use of the term mukashibanashi ("tales of long ago"?) to apply to all creative types of folktales (i.e., those that are not "legendary" types which are more of a reportage).

Seven Japanese Tales


Author: Junichiro Tanizaki
Publisher: Tuttle Publishing
ISBN: 1462903517
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 323
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In these seven Japanese short stories, Tanizaki, the author of The Makioka Sisters explores the territory where love becomes self–annihilation, where the contemplation of beauty gives way to fetishism, and where tradition becomes an instrument of refined cruelty. A young man is erotically imprisoned by the memory of his mother. A tattoo artist transforms the body of an exquisite woman into teeming canvas of her inner nature. A beautiful blink musician exacts the ultimate sacrifice from the man who both her lover and her disciple. These and other gripping scenarios of possession are told with such poise that Seven Japanese Tales is guaranteed to fascinate from beginning to end, leaving a haunting impression on the reader.

Tales from Japan


Author: Helen McAlpine,William McAlpine
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780192751751
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 150
View: 6122

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Includes accounts of the creation of earth and heaven, deeds of legendary Japanese warriors, and the romance of Princess Kaguya from the country of the moon.

Japanese Tales of Mystery and Imagination


Author: Edogawa Rampo
Publisher: Tuttle Publishing
ISBN: 9784805311936
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 224
View: 6358

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This collection of mystery and horror stories is regarded as Japan's answer to Edgar Allan Poe. Japanese Tales of Mystery & Imagination, the first volume of its kind translated into English, is written with the quick tempo of the West but rich with the fantasy of the East. These nine bloodcurdling, chilling tales present a genre of literature largely unknown to readers outside Japan, including the strange story of a quadruple amputee and his perverse wife; the record of a man who creates a mysterious chamber of mirrors and discovers hidden pleasures within; the morbid confession of a maniac who envisions a career of foolproof "psychological" murders; and the bizarre tale of a chair-maker who buries himself inside an armchair and enjoys the sordid "loves" of the women who sit on his handiwork. Lucid and packed with suspense, Edogawa Rampo's stories found in Japanese Tales of Mystery & Imagination have enthralled Japanese readers for over half a century. Mystery stories include: The Human Chair The Caterpillar Two Crippled Men The Traveler with the Pasted Rag Picture

Under the Cherry Blossom Tree

An Old Japanese Tale
Author: Allen Say
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780618556151
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 31
View: 8071

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A cherry tree growing from the top of the wicked landlord's head is the beginning of his misfortunes and a better life for the poor villagers.

Japanese Tales and Legends


Author: Helen McAlpine,William McAlpine
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780192741400
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 212
View: 7228

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Includes accounts of the creation of earth and heaven, deeds of legendary Japanese warriors, and the romance of Princess Kaguya from the country of the moon

Blue Bamboo

Japanese Tales of Fantasy
Author: Osamu Dazai,Ralph F. McCarthy
Publisher: Kodansha International
ISBN: 9784770026101
Category: Fiction
Page: 182
View: 7818

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Seven short stories by one of Japan's pre-eminent postwar writers and prose stylists. These imaginative stories are full of water spirits, ghosts, and a mixture of fantastic allegory and affecting romance.

Monsters, Animals, and Other Worlds

A Collection of Short Medieval Japanese Tales
Author: Keller Kimbrough,Haruo Shirane
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231545509
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 461
View: 777

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Monsters, Animals, and Other Worlds is a collection of twenty-five medieval Japanese tales of border crossings and the fantastic, featuring demons, samurai, talking animals, amorous plants, and journeys to supernatural realms. The most comprehensive compendium of short medieval Japanese fiction in English, Monsters, Animals, and Other Worlds illuminates a rich world of literary, Buddhist, and visual culture largely unknown today outside of Japan. These stories, called otogizōshi, or Muromachi tales (named after the Muromachi period, 1337 to 1573), date from approximately the fourteenth through seventeenth centuries. Often richly illustrated in a painted-scroll format, these vernacular stories frequently express Buddhist beliefs and provide the practical knowledge and moral education required to navigate medieval Japanese society. The otogizōshi represent a major turning point in the history of Japanese literature. They bring together many earlier types of narrative—court tales, military accounts, anecdotes, and stories about the divine origins of shrines and temples––joining book genres with parlor arts and the culture of itinerant storytellers and performers. The works presented here are organized into three thematically overlapping sections titled, “Monsters, Warriors, and Journeys to Other Worlds,” “Buddhist Tales,” and “Interspecies Affairs.” Each translation is prefaced by a short introduction, and the book features images from the original scroll paintings, illustrated manuscripts, and printed books.

Treasury of Japanese Folktales

Bilingual English and Japanese Edition
Author: Yuri Yasuda
Publisher: Tuttle Publishing
ISBN: 1462914624
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 112
View: 3421

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Learn Japanese and enjoy folktales at the same time with this whimsically illustrated multicultural children's book! This bilingual edition of A Treasury of Japanese Folktales—presented in both English and Japanese—contains 12 of the best Japanese legends and fairy tales, told to generation after generation of Japanese children. Originally written in English by Yuri Yasuda, based on her interpretations of traditional Japanese tales, these charming stories of rich imagination are now accompanied by Japanese text by Yumi Matsunari and Yumi Yamaguchi. The Japanese text includes basic kanji accompanied by furigana to help beginning learners to recognize and learn the characters. Adventures carry us, on turtle-back, to the splendors of the underwater palace of the dragon princess, to the beautiful hills where Kintaro plays with his animal friends, and to a temple where we discover a "tea kettle" that is really a cunning badger in disguise. Executed with great skill and imagination, the 98 color illustrations bring to life the charming characters of these heart-warming tales of old Japan, which include: Shitakiri Suzume, the Tongue-Cut Sparrow Kintaro, the Strong Boy Kaguya Hime, the Luminous Princess Momotaro, the Peach Boy Bunbuku Chagama, the Lucky Cauldron

Japanese Gothic Tales


Author: Ky?ka Izumi
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: 9780824817893
Category: Fiction
Page: 202
View: 2701

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The four stories presented here are among Kyoka's best-known works.

Japanese Children's Favorite Stories Book Two


Author: Florence Sakade
Publisher: Tuttle Publishing
ISBN: 146290811X
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 96
View: 2186

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This colorfully illustrated multicultural children's book presents Japanese fairy tales and other folk stories—providing insight into a rich literary culture. Playful goblins with long noses, magic tea kettles and a delightfully brave hero who just happens to be one inch tall-these are some of the wonderful characters you'll meet in this collection of the 20 best-loved Japanese children's stories. Drawn from folklore and passed down for generations, these classic tales speak of the virtues of hard work, humility, kindness and good humor — "Once upon a time …" has never sounded so inviting. Commemorating the 50th anniversary of one of our all-time best-selling titles. With a new foreword, each story has been lovingly revised and reset, and all the sparkling illustrations appear in color for the very first time. With so many enchanting stories to choose from, young readers will have a delightful time deciding which is their very favorite. The Children's Favorite Stories series was created to share the folktales and legends most beloved by children in the East with young readers of all backgrounds in the West. Other multicultural children's books in this series include: Asian Children's Favorite Stories, Indian Children's Favorite Stories, and Indonesian Children's Favorite Stories.

Japanese Tales from Times Past

Stories of Fantasy and Folklore from the Konjaku Monogatari Shu
Author: N.A
Publisher: Tuttle Publishing
ISBN: 1462917216
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 288
View: 9362

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This collection of translated tales is from the most famous work in all of Japanese classical literature—the Konjaku Monogatari Shu. This collection of traditional Japanese folklore is akin to the Canterbury Tales of Chaucer or Dante's Inferno—powerfully entertaining tales that reveal striking aspects of the cultural psychology, fantasy, and creativity of medieval Japan—tales that still resonate with modern Japanese readers today. The ninety stories in this book are filled with keen psychological insights, wry sarcasm, and scarcely veiled criticisms of the clergy, nobles, and peasants alike—suggesting that there are, among all classes and peoples, similar failings of pride, vanity, superstition and greed—as well as aspirations toward higher moral goals. This is the largest collection in English of the Konjaku Monogatari Shu tales ever published in one volume. It presents the low life and the high life, the humble and the devout, the profane flirting, farting and fornicating of everyday men and women, as well as their yearning for the wisdom, transcendence and compassion that are all part and parcel of our shared humanity. Stories Include: The Grave of Chopsticks Robbers Come to a Temple and Steal Its Bell The Woman Fish Peddler at the Guardhouse Fish are Turned into the Lotus Sutra A Dragon is Caught by a Tengu Goblin The Monk Tojo Predicts the Fall of Shujaku Gate Wasps Attack a Spider in Revenge

Japanese Singers of Tales: Ten Centuries of Performed Narrative


Author: Dr Alison McQueen Tokita
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 075465379X
Category: Music
Page: 288
View: 6364

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Alison Tokita presents a series of case studies that demonstrate the persistence of Japanese sung narratives in a multiplicity of genres over ten centuries together with factors contributing to change in narrative performance. Narratives that were continually re-told and recycled in different versions and formats over a long period of time served to build people's sense of a common identity over space (the geographical extent of 'Japan') and time (the enduring power of many specific narratives). The elements of variation and change relate to the move away from oral narrative to text-based performance, and from a simple narrative situation with one performer to complex theatrical narratives with dancers, singers and other musicians. Tokita includes substantial musical analysis and exploration of theoretical issues, as well as documentation of important performance traditions, all of which are extant.

Tales of Old Japan


Author: Algernon Bertram Freeman-Mitford Baron Redesdale
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Japan
Page: N.A
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The Oxford Book of Japanese Short Stories


Author: Theodore William Goossen
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0192803727
Category: Fiction
Page: 452
View: 1576

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This collection of short stories, including many new translations, is the first to span the whole of Japan's modern era from the end of the nineteenth century to the present day. Beginning with the first writings to assimilate and rework Western literary traditions, through the flourishing of the short story genre in the cosmopolitan atmosphere of the Taisho era, to the new breed of writers produced under the constraints of literary censorship, and the current writings reflecting the pitfalls and paradoxes of modern life, this anthology offers a stimulating survey of the development of the Japanese short story. Various indigenous traditions, in addition to those drawn from the West, recur throughout the stories: stories of the self, of the Water Trade (Tokyo's nightlife of geishas and prostitutes), of social comment, love and obsession, legends and fairytales. This collection includes the work of two Nobel prize-winners: Kawabata and Oe, the talented women writers Hirabayashi, Euchi, Okamoto, and Hayashi, together with the acclaimed Tanizaki, Mishima, and Murakami. The introduction by Theodore Goossen gives insight into these exotic and enigmatic, sometimes disturbing stories, derived from the lyrical roots of Japanese literature with its distinctive stress on atmosphere and beauty.

Wondrous Brutal Fictions

Eight Buddhist Tales from the Early Japanese Puppet Theater
Author: N.A
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231146582
Category: Drama
Page: 304
View: 8218

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"Wondrous Brutal Fictions" presents eight seminal works from the seventeenth-century Japanese "sekkyo" and "ko-joruri" puppet theaters. They range from stories of cruelty and brutality to tales of love, charity, and outstanding filial devotion, representing the best of early Edo-period literary and performance traditions and acting as important precursors to the bunraku and kabuki styles of theater. These texts relate the histories and miracles of particular buddhas, bodhisattvas, and local deities. Many of their protagonists are cultural icons, recognizable through their representation in later works of Japanese drama, fiction, and film. More than fifty reproductions of mostly seventeenth-century woodblock illustrations offer rich, visual foundations for the book's critical introduction and translated tales. The book provides an unprecedented encounter with popular Buddhist drama and its far-reaching impact on literature and culture.

The Demon at Agi Bridge and Other Japanese Tales


Author: Burton Watson,Haruo Shirane
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231152450
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 156
View: 8671

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Burton Watson and Haruo Shirane, renowned translators and scholars, introduce English-speaking readers to the vivid tradition of early and medieval Japanese anecdotal ( setsuwa) literature. These orally narrated and written tales drew on both local folk tradition and continental sources. Taken from seven major anthologies of anecdotal literature compiled between the ninth and thirteenth centuries, these dramatic and often amusing stories open a major window onto the foundations of Japanese culture. Out of thousands of setsuwa, Shirane has selected thirty-eight of the most powerful and influential, each of which is briefly introduced. Recounting the exploits of warriors, farmers, priests, and aristocrats, and concerning topics as varied as poetry, violence, power, and sex, these tales reveal the creative origins of a range of literary and dramatic genres, from court tales and travel accounts to no drama and Kabuki. Watson's impeccable translations relay the wit, mystery, and Buddhist sensibility of these protean works, while Shirane's sophisticated analysis illuminates the meaning and context of their compact stories. Capped by an extensive bibliography, this collection fully immerses the reader in the thrilling world of secular and religious tales.