Invisible Man, Got the Whole World Watching

A Young Black Man's Education
Author: Mychal Denzel Smith
Publisher: Nation Books
ISBN: 1568585292
Category: Social Science
Page: 240
View: 6773

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New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice How do you learn to be a black man in America? For young black men today, it means coming of age during the presidency of Barack Obama. It means witnessing the deaths of Oscar Grant, Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Akai Gurley, and too many more. It means celebrating powerful moments of black self-determination for LeBron James, Dave Chappelle, and Frank Ocean. In Invisible Man, Got the Whole World Watching, Mychal Denzel Smith chronicles his own personal and political education during these tumultuous years, describing his efforts to come into his own in a world that denied his humanity. Smith unapologetically upends reigning assumptions about black masculinity, rewriting the script for black manhood so that depression and anxiety aren't considered taboo, and feminism and LGBTQ rights become part of the fight. The questions Smith asks in this book are urgent--for him, for the martyrs and the tokens, and for the Trayvons that could have been and are still waiting.

Invisible Man, Got the Whole World Watching

A Young Black Man's Education
Author: Mychal Denzel Smith
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 1568585292
Category: Social Science
Page: 240
View: 2043

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New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice How do you learn to be a black man in America? For young black men today, it means coming of age during the presidency of Barack Obama. It means witnessing the deaths of Oscar Grant, Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Akai Gurley, and too many more. It means celebrating powerful moments of black self-determination for LeBron James, Dave Chappelle, and Frank Ocean. In Invisible Man, Got the Whole World Watching, Mychal Denzel Smith chronicles his own personal and political education during these tumultuous years, describing his efforts to come into his own in a world that denied his humanity. Smith unapologetically upends reigning assumptions about black masculinity, rewriting the script for black manhood so that depression and anxiety aren't considered taboo, and feminism and LGBTQ rights become part of the fight. The questions Smith asks in this book are urgent--for him, for the martyrs and the tokens, and for the Trayvons that could have been and are still waiting.

Black Men in College

Implications for HBCUs and Beyond
Author: Robert T. Palmer,J. Luke Wood
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136582940
Category: Education
Page: 224
View: 5240

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Black Men in College provides vital information about how to effectively support, retain, and graduate Black male undergraduates. This edited collection centers on the notion that Black male collegians are not a homogenous group; rather, they are representative of rarely acknowledged differences that exist among them. This valuable text suggests that understanding these differences is critical to making true in-roads in serving Black men. Chapter contributors describe the diverse challenges Black men in HBCUs face and discuss how to support and retain high-achieving men, gay men, academically unprepared men, low-income men, men in STEM, American immigrants, millennials, collegiate fathers, those affiliated with Greek organizations, and athletes. Recommendations for policy and practice to encourage retention and persistence to degree completion are grounded in extant theory and research. This text is a must-read for all higher education faculty, researchers, and student affairs practitioners interested in addressing the contemporary college experiences of Black men in postsecondary institutions.

Nobody

Casualties of America's War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond
Author: Marc Lamont Hill
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 150112496X
Category: Political Science
Page: 272
View: 4842

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Nobody is a powerful and eye-opening examination of the deeper meaning behind the string of deaths of unarmed citizens like Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Freddie Gray. Unarmed citizens shot by police. Drinking water turned to poison. Mass incarcerations. We've heard the stories. Now public intellectual and acclaimed journalist Marc Lamont Hill offers a powerful, paradigm-shifting analysis of race and class in America, and what it means to be "Nobody." Through on-the-ground reporting and careful research, Hill shows how some American citizens are made vulnerable, exploitable, and disposable through the machinery of unregulated capitalism, public policy, and social practice. This Nobody class, Hill argues, has emerged over time, and forces in America have worked to preserve and exploit it in ways that are both humiliating and harmful. He carefully reconsiders the details of tragic events like the deaths of Michael Brown, Sandra Bland, and Freddie Gray, and the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, and delves deeply into a host of alarming trends including mass incarceration, overly aggressive policing, broken court systems, shrinking job markets, and the privatization of public resources, showing time and again the ways the current system is designed to worsen the plight of the vulnerable.

The Chaneysville Incident

A Novel
Author: David Bradley
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 1480438529
Category: Fiction
Page: 432
View: 5924

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“Rivals Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon as the best novel about the black experience in America since Ellison’s Invisible Man” (The Christian Science Monitor). Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction and Finalist for the National Book Award Brilliant but troubled historian John Washington has left Philadelphia, where he is employed by a major university, to return to his hometown of Chaneysville, just north of the Mason-Dixon Line. He is there to care for Old Jack, one of the men who helped raise him when he was growing up on the Hill, an old black neighborhood in the little Pennsylvania town—but he also wants to learn more about the death of his father. What he discovers is that his father, Moses Washington, who was supposedly illiterate, left behind extensive notes on a mystery he was researching: why thirteen escaped slaves reached freedom in Chaneysville only to die there, for reasons forgotten or never known at all. A story of personal discovery and historical revelation, The Chaneysville Incident explores the power of our pasts. Based in part on actual events, this extraordinary novel was described by the Los Angeles Times as “perhaps the most significant work by a new black male author since James Baldwin dazzled in the early ’60s with his fine fury,” and placed David Bradley in the front ranks of contemporary American authors.

The Politics of Black Empowerment

The Transformation of Black Activism in Urban America
Author: James Jennings
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814323182
Category: Political Science
Page: 240
View: 424

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Publisher Fact Sheet An analysis of Black politics since the late 1960s.

From Jim Crow to Jay-Z

Race, Rap, and the Performance of Masculinity
Author: Miles White
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 025203662X
Category: Music
Page: 163
View: 418

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This multilayered study of the representation of black masculinity in musical and cultural performance takes aim at the reduction of African American male culture to stereotypes of deviance, misogyny, and excess. Broadening the significance of hip-hop culture by linking it to other expressive forms within popular culture, Miles White examines how these representations have both encouraged the demonization of young black males in the United States and abroad and contributed to the construction of their identities. From Jim Crow to Jay-Z traces black male representations to chattel slavery and American minstrelsy as early examples of fetishization and commodification of black male subjectivity.Continuing with diverse discussions including black action films, heavyweight prizefighting, Elvis Presley's performance of blackness, and white rappers such as Vanilla Ice and Eminem, White establishes a sophisticated framework for interpreting and critiquing black masculinity in hip-hop music and culture. Arguing that black music has undeniably shaped American popular culture and that hip-hop tropes have exerted a defining influence on young male aspirations and behavior, White draws a critical link between the body, musical sound, and the construction of identity.

Voice Male

The Untold Story of the Pro-Feminist Men's Movement
Author: Rob Okun
Publisher: Interlink Publishing
ISBN: 1623710472
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 3247

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VOICE MALE: The Untold Story of the Profeminist Men’s Movement takes you inside one of the most important social justice movements you may never have heard of—the social transformation of masculinity. Although it’s been underway since the late 1970s, it still largely remains under the radar of much of society. Thematically arranged essays by leading experts and moving first-person stories illustrate how a growing movement of changing men has discovered in feminism the basis for redefining masculinity and creating healthier lives. The longtime editor of Voice Male magazine, Rob Okun, introduces readers to men examining contemporary manhood from a variety of perspectives—from boys on the journey to manhood to men overcoming violence; from fatherhood and mentoring to navigating life as a man of color; as a gay man, and as a survivor. The voices of a chorus of women can also be heard in these pages. Long recognized for articulating a hopeful vision of the future of men, Okun sensitively presents a vivid portrait sure to be accessible to a wide audience interested in what is happening with men. His many years as a gender justice activist have not just deepened his skill as a chronicler of the profeminist men’s movement but also helped to strengthen his voice as a spokesperson articulating men’s second act. Voice Male offers compelling evidence of a new direction for men and illuminates what’s around the bend on the path to gender justice.

Bed-Stuy Is Burning

A Novel
Author: Brian Platzer
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501146955
Category: Fiction
Page: 336
View: 1761

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"Aaron, a disgraced rabbi turned Wall Street banker, and Amelia, his journalist girlfriend, live with their newborn in Bedford-Stuyvesant, one of the most rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods in New York City. The infusion of upwardly mobile strivers into Bed-Stuy's historic brownstones belies the tension simmering on the streets below. But after a cop shoots a boy in a nearby park, a riot erupts--with Aaron and his family at its center. Over the course of one cataclysmic day, issues of race, policing, faith, and professional ambition will collide"--

Black Man in a White Coat

A Doctor's Reflections on Race and Medicine
Author: Damon Tweedy
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1250044634
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 304
View: 7374

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"When Damon Tweedy first enters the halls of Duke University Medical School on a full scholarship, he envisions a bright future where his segregated, working class background will become largely irrelevant. Instead, he finds that he has joined a new world where race is front and center. When one of his first professors mistakes him for a maintenance worker, it is a moment that crystallizes the challenges he will face throughout his early career. Making matters worse, in lecture after lecture the common refrain for numerous diseases resounds: "more common in blacks than whites." [This book] examines the complex ways in which both black doctors and patients must navigate the difficult and often contradictory terrain of race and medicine"--

Deconstructing Tyrone

A New Look at Black Masculinity in the Hip-hop Generation
Author: Natalie Hopkinson,Natalie Y. Moore
Publisher: Cleis Press
ISBN: 1573442577
Category: Social Science
Page: 246
View: 2113

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A portrait of today's African-American male evaluates both archetypes and stereotypes, exploring black masculinity as it is represented by a range of personalities, from professionals and hip-hop figures to family men and criminals. Original.

No Ashes in the Fire

Coming of Age Black and Free in America
Author: Darnell L Moore
Publisher: Nation Books
ISBN: 1568589492
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 256
View: 5219

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From a leading journalist and activist comes a brave, beautifully wrought memoir. When Darnell Moore was fourteen, three boys from his neighborhood tried to set him on fire. They cornered him while he was walking home from school, harassed him because they thought he was gay, and poured a jug of gasoline on him. He escaped, but just barely. It wasn't the last time he would face death. Three decades later, Moore is an award-winning writer, a leading Black Lives Matter activist, and an advocate for justice and liberation. In No Ashes in the Fire, he shares the journey taken by that scared, bullied teenager who not only survived, but found his calling. Moore's transcendence over the myriad forces of repression that faced him is a testament to the grace and care of the people who loved him, and to his hometown, Camden, NJ, scarred and ignored but brimming with life. Moore reminds us that liberation is possible if we commit ourselves to fighting for it, and if we dream and create futures where those who survive on society's edges can thrive. No Ashes in the Fire is a story of beauty and hope-and an honest reckoning with family, with place, and with what it means to be free.

Unopened Books

Multiplying the 2%
Author: Jermaine D. Gassaway
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781546985877
Category:
Page: 118
View: 2267

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The unfathomable rate of Black males in education should result in a national call to action. Across the country Black males represent only 2% of the teaching workforce. By the year 2024, minority students will be the majority, yet our current education workforce does not reflect this growing trend in what has been called "The Browning of America." Why is it acceptable that a student can matriculate from Kindergarten through twelfth grade and not have one Black male as his or her teacher? Why has it been a challenge to recruit and in many instances retain Black males in the classroom? Unopened Books explains what is referenced in the book as the Five Black Male Deterrents in Education. Through the personal narrative of Jermaine D. Gassaway, a native Washingtonian, educator, and school leader; coupled with practical solutions, Unopened Books provides insight to multiply the 2%. It is intended to not only be a provocative conversation starter but an actionable approach to increase the number of Black men in the classroom.

Socioculturally Attuned Family Therapy

Guidelines for Equitable Theory and Practice
Author: Teresa McDowell,Carmen Knudson-Martin,J. Maria Bermudez
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317193652
Category: Psychology
Page: 260
View: 5958

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Socioculturally Attuned Family Therapy addresses the need for socially responsible couple, marriage, and family therapy that infuses diversity, equity, and inclusion throughout theory and clinical practice. The text begins with a discussion of societal systems, diversity, and socially just practice. The authors then integrate principles of societal context, power, and equity into the core concepts of ten major family therapy models, paying close attention to the "how to’s" of change processes through a highly diverse range of case examples. The text concludes with descriptions of integrative, equity-based family therapy guidelines that clinicians can apply to their practice.

Between the World and Me


Author: Ta-Nehisi Coates
Publisher: Spiegel & Grau
ISBN: 0679645985
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 176
View: 5389

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Hailed by Toni Morrison as “required reading,” a bold and personal literary exploration of America’s racial history by “the single best writer on the subject of race in the United States” (The New York Observer) #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER | NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER | NAACP IMAGE AWARD WINNER | PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST | NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST | NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • O: The Oprah Magazine • The Washington Post • People • Entertainment Weekly • Vogue • Los Angeles Times • San Francisco Chronicle • Chicago Tribune • New York • Newsday • Library Journal • Publishers Weekly In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation’s history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of “race,” a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden? Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates’s attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son—and readers—the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children’s lives were taken as American plunder. Beautifully woven from personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, Between the World and Me clearly illuminates the past, bracingly confronts our present, and offers a transcendent vision for a way forward. Praise for Between the World and Me “Powerful . . . a searing meditation on what it means to be black in America today.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times “Eloquent . . . in the tradition of James Baldwin with echoes of Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man . . . an autobiography of the black body in America.”—The Boston Globe “Brilliant . . . [Coates] is firing on all cylinders.”—The Washington Post “Urgent, lyrical, and devastating . . . a new classic of our time.”—Vogue “A crucial book during this moment of generational awakening.”—The New Yorker “Titanic and timely . . . essential reading.”—Entertainment Weekly

Invisible Man


Author: Ralph Ellison
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307743993
Category: Fiction
Page: 608
View: 7155

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Invisible Man is a milestone in American literature, a book that has continued to engage readers since its appearance in 1952. A first novel by an unknown writer, it remained on the bestseller list for sixteen weeks, won the National Book Award for fiction, and established Ralph Ellison as one of the key writers of the century. The nameless narrator of the novel describes growing up in a black community in the South, attending a Negro college from which he is expelled, moving to New York and becoming the chief spokesman of the Harlem branch of "the Brotherhood", and retreating amid violence and confusion to the basement lair of the Invisible Man he imagines himself to be. The book is a passionate and witty tour de force of style, strongly influenced by T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, Joyce, and Dostoevsky. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Warriors and Outlaws


Author: John R. Gordon
Publisher: Prowler Press
ISBN: N.A
Category: Fiction
Page: 210
View: 9407

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In his third novel, Gordon continues to explore the diversity of gay life in London, and specifically that of black gay men. Jazz, an aspiring politico and leader of the Panther Posse, shoots a cop. He seeks refuge with black drag queen Carly, a neighbour he has up to now ignored. Racism and homophobia complicate their relationship: Jazz's followers must deal with the fact that the man they look up to, idolise, in fact, is suddenly gay, Carly's friend Molly is threatened by the politicisation Jazz inspires in Carly. Gordon is adept at constructing a fast-paced, character-driven story that thrives on incident and debate. The shifting first person narrative makes for a deceptively easy read, and one comes away with a sense of having read about some complex issues almost by accident.

They Can't Kill Us All

Ferguson, Baltimore, and a New Era in America's Racial Justice Movement
Author: Wesley Lowery
Publisher: Little, Brown
ISBN: 0316312509
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 7717

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LA Times winner for The Christopher Isherwood Prize for Autobiographical Prose A New York Times bestseller A New York Times Editors' Choice A Featured Title in The New York Times Book Review's "Paperback Row" A Bustle "17 Books About Race Every White Person Should Read" "Essential reading."--Junot Diaz "Electric...so well reported, so plainly told and so evidently the work of a man who has not grown a callus on his heart."--Dwight Garner, New York Times, "A Top Ten Book of 2016" "I'd recommend everyone to read this book because it's not just statistics, it's not just the information, but it's the connective tissue that shows the human story behind it." -- Trevor Noah, The Daily Show A deeply reported book that brings alive the quest for justice in the deaths of Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Freddie Gray, offering both unparalleled insight into the reality of police violence in America and an intimate, moving portrait of those working to end it Conducting hundreds of interviews during the course of over one year reporting on the ground, Washington Post writer Wesley Lowery traveled from Ferguson, Missouri, to Cleveland, Ohio; Charleston, South Carolina; and Baltimore, Maryland; and then back to Ferguson to uncover life inside the most heavily policed, if otherwise neglected, corners of America today. In an effort to grasp the magnitude of the repose to Michael Brown's death and understand the scale of the problem police violence represents, Lowery speaks to Brown's family and the families of other victims other victims' families as well as local activists. By posing the question, "What does the loss of any one life mean to the rest of the nation?" Lowery examines the cumulative effect of decades of racially biased policing in segregated neighborhoods with failing schools, crumbling infrastructure and too few jobs. Studded with moments of joy, and tragedy, They Can't Kill Us All offers a historically informed look at the standoff between the police and those they are sworn to protect, showing that civil unrest is just one tool of resistance in the broader struggle for justice. As Lowery brings vividly to life, the protests against police killings are also about the black community's long history on the receiving end of perceived and actual acts of injustice and discrimination. They Can't Kill Us All grapples with a persistent if also largely unexamined aspect of the otherwise transformative presidency of Barack Obama: the failure to deliver tangible security and opportunity to those Americans most in need of both.