Institutions for the Common Good

International Protection Regimes in International Society
Author: Bruce Cronin
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521531870
Category: History
Page: 234
View: 5726

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Cronin asks why states act collectively to protect populations within other states.

Refugees in International Relations


Author: Alexander Betts,Gil Loescher
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199595623
Category: Political Science
Page: 337
View: 2373

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Drawing together the work and ideas of a combination of the world's leading and emerging International Relations scholars, Refugees in International Relations provides a comprehensive and challenging overview of the international politics of forced migration.

The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies


Author: Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh,Gil Loescher,Katy Long,Nando Sigona
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191645885
Category: Political Science
Page: 800
View: 5998

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Refugee and Forced Migration Studies has grown from being a concern of a relatively small number of scholars and policy researchers in the 1980s to a global field of interest with thousands of students worldwide studying displacement either from traditional disciplinary perspectives or as a core component of newer programmes across the Humanities and Social and Political Sciences. Today the field encompasses both rigorous academic research which may or may not ultimately inform policy and practice, as well as action-research focused on advocating in favour of refugees' needs and rights. This authoritative Handbook critically evaluates the birth and development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and analyses the key contemporary and future challenges faced by academics and practitioners working with and for forcibly displaced populations around the world. The 52 state-of-the-art chapters, written by leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers working in universities, research centres, think tanks, NGOs and international organizations, provide a comprehensive and cutting-edge overview of the key intellectual, political, social and institutional challenges arising from mass displacement in the world today. The chapters vividly illustrate the vibrant and engaging debates that characterise this rapidly expanding field of research and practice.

Taming the Sovereigns

Institutional Change in International Politics
Author: Kalevi Jaakko Holsti
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521541923
Category: History
Page: 349
View: 6207

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Many analysts claim that international politics has recently entered a new era, following the end of the Cold War and then the events of September 11th. In this book, Kalevi Holsti asks what we mean by 'change' in international politics. How do we identify it? How do we distinguish between significant and unimportant changes? Do we really live in a new era or do we see more continuity than transformation in the texture of international politics? Combining theoretical and empirical argument, Holsti investigates eight major international institutions including the state, sovereignty, territoriality, international law, diplomacy, trade and war. Having identified the types of change these institutions have undergone during the last three centuries, Holsti analyses the sources of those changes and speculates on their consequences. This is a major book, likely to have lasting influence in the study of international politics.

The Politics of International Law


Author: Christian Reus-Smit
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521546713
Category: Law
Page: 324
View: 7257

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This volume advances a new perspective on the politics of international law, illustrated through case studies.

The Realist Tradition and the Limits of International Relations


Author: Michael C. Williams
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521534758
Category: History
Page: 236
View: 6746

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Realism is commonly portrayed as theory that reduces international relations to pure power politics. Michael Williams provides an important reexamination of the Realist tradition and its relevance for contemporary international relations. Examining three thinkers commonly invoked as Realism's foremost proponents - Hobbes, Rousseau, and Morgenthau - the book shows that, far from advocating a crude realpolitik, Realism's most famous classical proponents actually stressed the need for a restrained exercise of power and a politics with ethics at its core. These ideas are more relevant than ever at a time when the nature of responsible responses to international problems are at the centre of contemporary political debate. This original interpretation of major thinkers will interest scholars of international relations and the history of ideas.

From International to World Society?

English School Theory and the Social Structure of Globalisation
Author: Barry Buzan
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521541213
Category: Political Science
Page: 294
View: 5839

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In this 2004 book, Barry Buzan offers an extensive critique and reappraisal of the English school approach to International Relations. Starting on the neglected concept of world society and bringing together the international society tradition and the Wendtian mode of constructivism, Buzan offers a new theoretical framework that can be used to address globalisation as a complex political interplay among state and non-state actors. This approach forces English school theory to confront neglected questions about both its basic concepts and assumptions, and about the constitution of society in terms of what values are shared, how and why they are shared, and by whom. Buzan highlights the idea of primary institutions as the central contribution of English school theory and shows how this both differentiates English school theory from realism and neoliberal institutionalism, and how it can be used to generate distinctive comparative and historical accounts of international society.

Renegotiating the World Order


Author: Phillip Y. Lipscy
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107149762
Category: Political Science
Page: 348
View: 7893

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Rising powers often seek to reshape the world order, triggering confrontations with those who seek to defend the status quo. In recent years, as international institutions have grown in prevalence and influence, they have increasingly become central arenas for international contestation. Phillip Y. Lipscy examines how international institutions evolve as countries seek to renegotiate the international order. He offers a new theory of institutional change and explains why some institutions change flexibly while others successfully resist or fall to the wayside. The book uses a wealth of empirical evidence - quantitative and qualitative - to evaluate the theory from international organizations such as the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, European Union, League of Nations, United Nations, the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization, and Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers. The book will be of particular interest to scholars interested in the historical and contemporary diplomacy of the United States, Japan, and China.

Rethinking Security in the Age of Migration

Trust and Emancipation in Europe
Author: Ali Bilgic
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136765352
Category: Political Science
Page: 224
View: 8159

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Migration and especially irregular migration are politically sensitive and highly debated issues in the developed world, particularly in Europe. This book analyses irregular protection-seeking migration in Europe, with close attention to sub-Saharan migration into the EU, from the perspective of emancipatory security theory. Some individuals leave their countries because political, social, and economic structures largely fail to provide protection. This book examines how communities respond to migrants who seek protection and security, where migration is perceived as a source of insecurity by many in that community. The central aim of this critical analysis is to explore ideas and practices which can contribute to replacing the political structures of insecurity with emancipatory structures, where individuals (both irregular migrants and members of the receiving communities) enjoy security together, not opposed to each other. Drawing on the security dilemma, critical approaches to security, forced migration and trust, the book demonstrates how common life between two groups of individuals can be politically constructed, in tandem with limitations, risks, and possible handicaps of initiating such a construction in world politics. Rethinking Security in the Age of Migration will be of interest to students and scholars of migration studies, security studies, international relations, European politics and sociology.

Security Cooperation in Africa

A Reappraisal
Author: Benedikt Franke
Publisher: First Forum Press
ISBN: N.A
Category: Political Science
Page: 337
View: 4602

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Benedikt Franke assesses the peace and security architecture that is taking shape under the nominal leadership of the African Union, analysing the emerging structures and trends and also rethinking prevailing notions and theoretical assumptions about interstate security relations.

International Relations and Security in the Digital Age


Author: Johan Eriksson,Giampiero Giacomello
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134143818
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 3964

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This book examines the impact of the information revolution on international and domestic security, attempting to remedy both the lack of theoretically informed analysis of information security and the US-centric tendency in the existing literature. International Relations and Security in the Digital Age covers a range of topics, including: critical infrastructure protection, privacy issues, international cooperation, cyber terrorism, and security policy. It aims to analyze the impact of the information revolution on international and domestic security; examine what existing international relations theories can say about this challenge; and discuss how international relations theory can be developed to better meet this challenge. The analysis suggests that Liberalism’s focus on pluralism, interdependence and globalization, Constructivism’s emphasis on language, symbols and images (including ‘virtuality’), and some elements of Realist strategic studies (on the specific topic of information warfare) contribute to a better understanding of digital age security. This book will be of interest to students of security studies, globalization, international relations, and politics and technology.

The Effectiveness of International Environmental Regimes

Causal Connections and Behavioral Mechanisms
Author: Oran R. Young
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262740234
Category: Political Science
Page: 326
View: 1855

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To be effective, an international regime must play a significant role in solving or at least managing the problem that led to its creation. But because regimes--social institutions composed of roles, rules, and relationships--are not actors in their own right, they can succeed only by influencing the behavior of their members or actors operating under their members' jurisdiction.This book examines how regimes influence the behavior of their members and those associated with them. It identifies six mechanisms through which regimes affect behavior and discusses the role of each through in-depth case studies of three major environmental concerns: intentional vessel-source oil pollution, shared fisheries, and transboundary acid rain. The behavioral mechanisms feature regimes as utility modifiers, as enhancers of cooperation, as bestowers of authority, as learning facilitators, as role definers, and as agents of internal realignments. The case studies show how these mechanisms can cause variations in effectiveness both across regimes and within individual regimes over time.One of the book's primary contributions is to develop methods to demonstrate which causal mechanisms come into play with specific regimes. It emphasizes the need to supplement conventional models assuming unitary and utility-maximizing actors to explain variations in regime effectiveness.Contributors : Lee G. Anderson, Ann Barrett, Marc A. Levy, Moira L. McConnell, Natalia Mirovitskaya, Ronald Mitchell, Don Munton, Elena Nikitina, Gail Osherenko, Alexei Roginko, Marvin Soroos, Olav Schram Stokke, Oran R. Young.

Technology and Security

Governing Threats in the New Millennium
Author: Brian Rappert
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 9780230019706
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 9651

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Technology and Security takes forward the existing state of academic understanding where security and technology intersect. It assesses the challenges posed by emerging scientific and technological developments for security while understanding how perceptions of security threats are themselves formed in relation to conceptions of science and technology.

Maritime Challenges and Priorities in Asia

Implications for Regional Security
Author: Joshua Ho,Sam Bateman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136298207
Category: Social Science
Page: 336
View: 3266

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Maritime issues are particularly important for Asian countries, where there is a high reliance on shipping routes for international trade, many difficult disputes over maritime boundaries, and the prospect of increasing tensions where maritime power might play a significant role. This book uses contributions by 17 experts to build a comprehensive survey of the maritime issues affecting Asia. It discusses the issues overall, goes on to examine the issues from the perspective of each of 14 key countries, and concludes by assessing the prospects for resolving common problems in order to preserve good order at sea.

Global good Samaritans

human rights as foreign policy
Author: Alison Brysk
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: N.A
Category: Philosophy
Page: 287
View: 4329

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In a troubled world where millions die at the hands of their own governments and societies, some states risk their citizens' lives, considerable portions of their national budgets, and repercussions from opposing states to protect helpless foreigners. Dozens of Canadian peacekeepers have died in Afghanistan defending humanitarian reconstruction in a shattered faraway land with no ties to their own. Each year, Sweden contributes over $3 billion to aid the world's poorest citizens and struggling democracies, asking nothing in return. And, a generation ago, Costa Rica defied U.S. power to broker a peace accord that ended civil wars in three neighboring countries--and has now joined with principled peers like South Africa to support the United Nations' International Criminal Court, despite U.S. pressure and aid cuts. Hundreds of thousands of refugees are alive today because they have been sheltered by one of these nations. Global Good Samaritans looks at the reasons why and how some states promote human rights internationally, arguing that humanitarian internationalism is more than episodic altruism--it is a pattern of persistent principled politics. Human rights as a principled foreign policy defies the realist prediction of untrammeled pursuit of national interest, and suggests the utility of constructivist approaches that investigate the role of ideas, identities, and influences on state action. Brysk shows how a diverse set of democratic middle powers, inspired by visionary leaders and strong civil societies, came to see the linkage between their long-term interest and the common good. She concludes that state promotion of global human rights may be an option for many more members of the international community and that the international human rights regime can be strengthened at the interstate level, alongside social movement campaigns and the struggle for the democratization of global governance.

Security Communities


Author: Emanuel Adler,Michael Barnett
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521639538
Category: Political Science
Page: 462
View: 1336

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This book argues that community can exist at the international level, and that security politics is profoundly shaped by it, with states dwelling within an international community having the capacity to develop a pacific disposition. By investigating the relationship between international community and the possibility for peaceful change, this book revisits the concept first pioneered by Karl Deutsch: 'security communities'. Leading scholars examine security communities in various historical and regional contexts: in places where they exist, where they are emerging, and where they are hardly detectable. Building on constructivist theory, the volume is an important contribution to international relations theory and security studies, attempting to understand the conjunction of transnational forces, state power and international organizations that can produce a security community.

Managing Social Change and Social Policy in Greater China

Welfare Regimes in Transition
Author: Ka-Ho Mok,Maggie K. W. Lau
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134575149
Category: Political Science
Page: 250
View: 3203

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East Asia is at the heart of the global economic transformation, and the countries of the region are witnessing rapidly changing labour markets, alongside the pressure to cut production costs and lower taxes in order to become successful ‘competition states’. These changes have resulted in increased welfare demands which governments, organizations and agencies across the region have had to address. This book examines welfare regimes in the Greater China region, encompassing mainland China, Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan. In so doing, it explores the ways in which the rapid growth and internationalisation of the economy across Greater China is presenting new social policy challenges that governments, social welfare organizations and agencies in the region are having to respond to. Rather than simply describing and categorising welfare systems, the contributors to this volume add to our understanding of how one of the major economic transformations of the contemporary era in East Asia is shaping welfare provision in the region. In turn, in this context of economic change, they examine the new strategies and measures that have been adopted in order to reduce the heavy burden on the state in terms of welfare provision, whilst also attempting to diversify funding and provision sources to meet the pressing welfare needs. Based upon extensive fieldwork by leading scholars of social policy, this book will appeal to students and scholars of Asian social policy, comparative development and social policy, social welfare and Chinese studies.

The Vulnerable in International Society


Author: Ian Clark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199646082
Category: Political Science
Page: 190
View: 9614

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What makes people vulnerable to harm? In this contribution to International Relations theory, the author shows how international systems of protection (such as the Geneva Conventions, or the Refugee Convention) can have a social impact on how vulnerability is distributed, leaving some people more exposed to risk. This view is demonstrated through four cases, tracing the consequences for vulnerability in the areas of political violence, climate change, humanmovement, and global health. Although these are often presented as simply technical or practical problems requiring management, the author makes clear that they are essentially moral in nature. This makes their solution even more complex.