In Cold Blood


Author: Truman Capote
Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.
ISBN: 0812994388
Category: True Crime
Page: 396
View: 2257

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Powerful account of the brutal slaying of a Kansas family by two young ex-convicts.

The Executioner's Song


Author: Norman Mailer
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
ISBN: 1455510831
Category: Fiction
Page: 1136
View: 3787

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Norman Mailer's Pulitzer Prize-winning and unforgettable classic about convicted killer Gary Gilmore now in a brand-new edition. Arguably the greatest book from America's most heroically ambitious writer, THE EXECUTIONER'S SONG follows the short, blighted life of Gary Gilmore who became famous after he robbed two men in 1976 and killed them in cold blood. After being tried and convicted, he immediately insisted on being executed for his crime. To do so, he fought a system that seemed intent on keeping him alive long after it had sentenced him to death. And that fight for the right to die is what made him famous. Mailer tells not only Gilmore's story, but those of the men and women caught in the web of his life and drawn into his procession toward the firing squad. All with implacable authority, steely compassion, and a restraint that evokes the parched landscape and stern theology of Gilmore's Utah. THE EXECUTIONER'S SONG is a trip down the wrong side of the tracks to the deepest source of American loneliness and violence. It is a towering achievement-impossible to put down, impossible to forget. (280,000 words)

Music For Chameleons


Author: Truman Capote
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0345803086
Category: Fiction
Page: 288
View: 2149

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In these gems of reportage Truman Capote takes true stories and real people and renders them with the stylistic brio we expect from great fiction. Here we encounter an exquisitely preserved Creole aristocrat sipping absinthe in her Martinique salon; an enigmatic killer who sends his victims announcements of their forthcoming demise; and a proper Connecticut householder with a ruinous obsession for a twelve-year-old he has never met. And we meet Capote himself, who, whether he is smoking with his cleaning lady or trading sexual gossip with Marilyn Monroe, remains one of the most elegant, malicious, yet compassionate writers to train his eye on the social fauna of his time.

The Green Bookshop

Recommended Reading for Doctors and Others from the Medical Journal Education for Primary Care
Author: John Salinsky,Iona Heath,Matthew Walters
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1315342960
Category: Medical
Page: 160
View: 7313

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The collection includes: *

Party Monster

A Fabulous But True Tale of Murder in Clubland
Author: James St. James
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9780743259828
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 288
View: 1788

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The author reveals the New York Club scene at its worst as he relates his involvement with Michael Alig, a Midwest nerd who became a leading club promoter and eventually found trouble after killing a drug dealer.

The Journalist and the Murderer


Author: Janet Malcolm
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307797872
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 176
View: 1856

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A seminal work and examination of the psychopathology of journalism. Using a strange and unprecedented lawsuit as her larger-than-life example -- the lawsuit of Jeffrey MacDonald, a convicted murderer, against Joe McGinniss, the author of Fatal Vision, a book about the crime -- she delves into the always uneasy, sometimes tragic relationship that exists between journalist and subject. In Malcolm's view, neither journalist nor subject can avoid the moral impasse that is built into the journalistic situation. When the text first appeared, as a two-part article in The New Yorker, its thesis seemed so radical and its irony so pitiless that journalists across the country reacted as if stung. Her book is a work of journalism as well as an essay on journalism: it at once exemplifies and dissects its subject. In her interviews with the leading and subsidiary characters in the MacDonald-McGinniss case -- the principals, their lawyers, the members of the jury, and the various persons who testified as expert witnesses at the trial -- Malcolm is always aware of herself as a player in a game that, as she points out, she cannot lose. The journalist-subject encounter has always troubled journalists, but never before has it been looked at so unflinchingly and so ruefully. Hovering over the narrative -- and always on the edge of the reader's consciousness -- is the MacDonald murder case itself, which imparts to the book an atmosphere of anxiety and uncanniness. The Journalist and the Murderer derives from and reflects many of the dominant intellectual concerns of our time, and it will have a particular appeal for those who cherish the odd, the off-center, and the unsolved.

The Murder Room

The Heirs of Sherlock Holmes Gather to Solve the World's Most Perplexing Cold Ca ses
Author: Michael Capuzzo
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101458952
Category: True Crime
Page: 464
View: 9578

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Thrilling, true tales from the Vidocq Society, a team of the world's finest forensic investigators whose monthly gourmet lunches lead to justice in ice-cold murders Three of the greatest detectives in the world--a renowned FBI agent turned private eye, a sculptor and lothario who speaks to the dead, and an eccentric profiler known as "the living Sherlock Holmes"-were heartsick over the growing tide of unsolved murders. Good friends and sometime rivals William Fleisher, Frank Bender, and Richard Walter decided one day over lunch that something had to be done, and pledged themselves to a grand quest for justice. The three men invited the greatest collection of forensic investigators ever assembled, drawn from five continents, to the Downtown Club in Philadelphia to begin an audacious quest: to bring the coldest killers in the world to an accounting. Named for the first modern detective, the Parisian eugène François Vidocq-the flamboyant Napoleonic real-life sleuth who inspired Sherlock Holmes-the Vidocq Society meets monthly in its secretive chambers to solve a cold murder over a gourmet lunch. The Murder Room draws the reader into a chilling, darkly humorous, awe-inspiring world as the three partners travel far from their Victorian dining room to hunt the ruthless killers of a millionaire's son, a serial killer who carves off faces, and a child killer enjoying fifty years of freedom and dark fantasy. Acclaimed bestselling author Michael Capuzzo's brilliant storytelling brings true crime to life more realistically and vividly than it has ever been portrayed before. It is a world of dazzlingly bright forensic science; true evil as old as the Bible and dark as the pages of Dostoevsky; and a group of flawed, passionate men and women, inspired by their own wounded hearts to make a stand for truth, goodness, and justice in a world gone mad.

Real Life Writings in American Literary Journalism: a Narratological Study


Author: Gurpreet Kaur
Publisher: Partridge Publishing
ISBN: 1482850850
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 258
View: 9166

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This referential collection of essays is an important guide to the emergence and development of literary journalism through the centuries. The book begins with the defining of genres, literature and journalism, which blur the lines between them. It also gives an insight into the theories of narratology. Some practitioners included in this book are great American writers like, John Hersey, Truman Capote, Norman Mailer and Don DeLillo. These literary journalists bring to life both major as well trivial issues of the society. New journalists coalesce all the fictional techniques with the journalistic methods to present a unique and sophisticated style which requires extensive research and even more careful reporting than done in the typical news articles. The book closes with the concluding thoughts followed by list of works cited.

And the Hippos Were Boiled in Their Tanks


Author: William S. Burroughs,Jack Kerouac
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
ISBN: 9780802198891
Category: Fiction
Page: 224
View: 9577

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In the summer of 1944, a shocking murder rocked the fledgling Beats. William S. Burroughs and Jack Kerouac, both still unknown, we inspired by the crime to collaborate on a novel, a hard-boiled tale of bohemian New York during World War II, full of drugs and art, obsession and brutality, with scenes and characters drawn from their own lives. Finally published after more than sixty years, this is a captivating read, and incomparable literary artifact, and a window into the lives and art of two of the twentieth century’s most influential writers.

Actors and Networks in the Megacity

A Literary Analysis of Urban Narratives
Author: Prachi More
Publisher: transcript Verlag
ISBN: 3839438349
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 220
View: 3419

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This study is a concise introduction to Bruno Latour's Actor-Network Theory and its application in a literary analysis of urban narratives of the 21st century. We encounter well-known psycho-geographers such as Iain Sinclair and Sam Miller, and renowned authors, Patrick Neate and Suketu Mehta. Prachi More analyses these authors' accounts of vastly different cities such as London, Delhi, Mumbai, Johannesburg, New York and Tokyo. Are these urban narratives a contemporary solution to documenting an ever-evasive urban reality? If so, how do they embody "matters of concern" as Latour would have put it, laying bare modern-day "actors" and "networks" rather than reporting mere "matters of fact"? These questions are drawn into an inter-disciplinary discussion that addresses concerns and questions of epistemology, the sociology of knowledge as well as urban and documentary studies.

Party of the Century

The Fabulous Story of Truman Capote and His Black and White Ball
Author: Deborah Davis
Publisher: Wiley
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 7972

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In 1966, everyone who was anyone wanted an invitation to Truman Capote's "Black and White Dance" in New York, and guests included Frank Sinatra, Norman Mailer, C. Z. Guest, Kennedys, Rockefellers, and more. Lavishly illustrated with photographs and drawings of the guests, this portrait of revelry at the height of the swirling, swinging sixties is a must for anyone interested in American popular culture and the lifestyles of the rich, famous, and talented.

The Grass Harp


Author: Truman Capote
Publisher: Dramatists Play Service Inc
ISBN: 9780822204763
Category: Drama
Page: 71
View: 9320

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THE STORY: In the first section of the play Mr. Capote is writing with an original, offbeat humor that seems completely irresponsible. It has been gathered out of his vagrant memories and turned into comedy. But he has something more than a frolic

Blood and Money

The Classic True Story of Murder, Passion, and Power
Author: Thomas Thompson
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 150404326X
Category: True Crime
Page: 450
View: 1574

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Edgar Award Winner: The “gripping” true story of a beautiful Texas socialite, her ambitious husband, and a string of mysterious deaths (Los Angeles Times). Joan Robinson Hill was a world-class equestrian, a glamorous member of Houston high society, and the wife of Dr. John Hill, a handsome and successful plastic surgeon. Her father, Ash Robinson, was a charismatic oil tycoon obsessed with making his daughter’s every dream come true. Rich, attractive, and reckless, Joan was one of the most celebrated women in a town infatuated with money, power, and fame. Then one morning in 1969, she fell mysteriously ill. The sordid events that followed comprise “what may be the most compelling and complex case in crime annals” (Ann Rule, bestselling author of The Stranger Beside Me). From the elegant mansions of River Oaks, one of America’s most exclusive neighborhoods, to a seedy underworld of prostitution and murder-for-hire, New York Times–bestselling author Thomas Thompson tracks down every bizarre motive and enigmatic clue to weave a fascinating tale of lust and vengeance. Full of colorful characters, shocking twists, and deadly secrets, Blood and Money is “an absolute spellbinder” and true crime masterpiece (Newsweek).

Portraits and Observations


Author: Truman Capote
Publisher: Modern Library
ISBN: 0812995120
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 672
View: 8218

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Perhaps no twentieth century writer was so observant and elegant a chronicler of his times as Truman Capote. Whether he was profiling the rich and famous or creating indelible word-pictures of events and places near and far, Capote’s eye for detail and dazzling style made his reportage and commentary undeniable triumphs of the form. Portraits and Observations is the first volume devoted solely to all the essays ever published by this most beloved of writers. From his travel sketches of Brooklyn, New Orleans, and Hollywood, written when he was twenty-two, to meditations about fame, fortune, and the writer’s art at the peak of his career, to the brief works penned during the isolated denouement of his life, these essays provide an essential window into mid-twentieth-century America as offered by one of its canniest observers. Included are such celebrated masterpieces of narrative nonfiction as “The Muses Are Heard” and the short nonfiction novel “Handcarved Coffins,” as well as many long-out-of-print essays, including portraits of Isak Dinesen, Mae West, Marcel Duchamp, Humphrey Bogart, and Marilyn Monroe. Among the highlights are “Ghosts in Sunlight: The Filming of In Cold Blood, “Preface to Music for Chameleons, in which Capote candidly recounts the highs and lows of his long career, and a playful self-portrait in the form of an imaginary self-interview. The book concludes with the author’s last written words, composed the day before his death in 1984, the recently discovered “Remembering Willa Cather,” Capote’s touching recollection of his encounter with the author when he was a young man at the dawn of his career. Portraits and Observations puts on display the full spectrum of Truman Capote’s brilliance. Certainly, Capote was, as Somerset Maugham famously called him, “a stylist of the first quality.” But as the pieces gathered here remind us, he was also an artist of remarkable substance.

Under the Skin


Author: Michel Faber
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547546114
Category: Fiction
Page: 320
View: 1477

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Hailed as "original and unsettling, an Animal Farm for the new century" (The Wall Street Journal), this first novel lingers long after the last page has been turned. Described as a "fascinating psychological thriller" (The Baltimore Sun), this entrancing novel introduces Isserley, a female driver who picks up hitchhikers with big muscles. She, herself, is tiny--like a kid peering up over the steering wheel. Scarred and awkward, yet strangely erotic and threatening, she listens to her hitchhikers as they open up to her, revealing clues about who might miss them if they should disappear. At once humane and horrifying, Under the Skin takes us on a heart-thumping ride through dangerous territory--our own moral instincts and the boundaries of compassion. A grotesque and comical allegory, a surreal representation of contemporary society run amok, Under the Skin has been internationally received as the arrival of an exciting talent, rich and assured.

Breakfast at Tiffany's and Other Voices, Other Rooms


Author: Truman Capote
Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.
ISBN: 0812994361
Category: Fiction
Page: 286
View: 6139

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The hillbilly-turned-Manhattanite at the center of Breakfast at Tiffany's shares not only the author's philosophy of freedom but also his fears and anxieties. Other Voices, Other Rooms begins as thirteen-year-old Joel Knox, after losing his mother, is sent from New Orleans to rural Alabama to live with his estranged father--who is nowhere to be found.

The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher

A Shocking Murder and the Undoing of a Great Victorian Detective
Author: Kate Summerscale
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 9780802779298
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 5244

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In June of 1860 three-year-old Saville Kent was found at the bottom of an outdoor privy with his throat slit. The crime horrified all England and led to a national obsession with detection, ironically destroying, in the process, the career of perhaps the greatest detective in the land. At the time, the detective was a relatively new invention; there were only eight detectives in all of England and rarely were they called out of London, but this crime was so shocking, as Kate Summerscale relates in her scintillating new book, that Scotland Yard sent its best man to investigate, Inspector Jonathan Whicher. Whicher quickly believed the unbelievable-that someone within the family was responsible for the murder of young Saville Kent. Without sufficient evidence or a confession, though, his case was circumstantial and he returned to London a broken man. Though he would be vindicated five years later, the real legacy of Jonathan Whicher lives on in fiction: the tough, quirky, knowing, and all-seeing detective that we know and love today...from the cryptic Sgt. Cuff in Wilkie Collins's The Moonstone to Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade. The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher is a provocative work of nonfiction that reads like a Victorian thriller, and in it Kate Summerscale has fashioned a brilliant, multilayered narrative that is as cleverly constructed as it is beautifully written.